• December Photo Competition!
    We are excited to announce the return of our regular photo competitions, starting things off with the holiday season! Gather the best photos of your bearded dragons... the theme for this month is "Fun and Festive!" For details check out the December Photo Compeitition thread.

Accidental Fall, Head Color Changing

BeardieRex2021

New member
My beardie accidentally fell off the bed two nights ago. He had issues moving for a few minutes but then was moving fine. We took all his climbing things out to give him rest. But now his head is getting lighter. He is still active and eating/pooping. Help please!
 

BeardieRex2021

New member
Original Poster
Can you post some photos of him? Perhaps his head is getting lighter due to oncoming shed and it was coincidental timing.
Thanks for the help! He just finished shedding a couple weeks ago.
B7257DE0-F7D3-472D-BD2E-5DEEC545D1C2.jpeg
image.jpg
 

CooperDragon

BD.org Sicko
Staff member
Moderator
That looks like another round of oncoming shed to me. Be on the lookout for skin starting to peel and some general cranky behavior and eye bulging in the coming weeks. The shed cycles can be frequent for a while when they hit growth spurts. He should be OK =).
 

BeardieRex2021

New member
Original Poster
That looks like another round of oncoming shed to me. Be on the lookout for skin starting to peel and some general cranky behavior and eye bulging in the coming weeks. The shed cycles can be frequent for a while when they hit growth spurts. He should be OK =).
We are new to reptiles and have a few other questions. How often should I bathe/sprits him? How much should he be eating daily? Is it okay to turn his heat off at night or does he need a heat ball/pad/lightless heat lamp?
 

CooperDragon

BD.org Sicko
Staff member
Moderator
Baths aren't necessary unless they get soiled and need to be cleaned off. Some of them are stressed out by baths and it's not worth the stress. Others enjoy a bath and swimming around a bit. In those cases, you can offer them baths whenever you want. It's kind of a unique choice for each dragon. He will get most of his hydration from fresh veges and live bugs, but you can offer extra water by dripping it on his nose to lick up. If he is thirsty, he will tilt his head forward and lick at the water drops. Some of them will drink from a bowl. Sometimes it takes training by flicking at the water to create movement and grab their interest. Others don't drink from a bowl, and that's OK as long as they are eating well. The best indicator of hydration is to look at their poop. If there is excess water coming through and the poop and urate looks hydrated, that's a good sign. If the urate looks dry/chalky then it may indicate that some extra water is needed.

The amount he eats will vary. They eat more when they hit a growth spurt. And will often eat less during a shed or in between growth spurts. Offer a salad every day and a couple of bug meals per day up until about a year old. Then slowly taper down to 1 bug meal per day and then 2-3 bug meals per week by 18-24 months old. Adults should be eating mostly veges, but that is often a gradual transition. This is just a general guide though and each dragon will vary a bit. The key is to offer as much variety as you can in order for them to get plenty of nutrients. Having staples on hand that they like is good, but swap in some new stuff once in a while that's all.

The visible lights (basking light and UVB light) should follow the pattern of the sun and be off at night. If the temps inside the enclosure stay above about 65 or so overnight, then no additional heat is needed. If the enclosure gets colder than that, you can use a heat projector or ceramic heat emitter which will provide heat without visible light (which would disturb their sleep). A bit of a cooldown overnight is natural for them. You don't need to bump the heat much overnight. Just into the high 60s or low 70s is good.
 

BeardieRex2021

New member
Original Poster
Bc
Baths aren't necessary unless they get soiled and need to be cleaned off. Some of them are stressed out by baths and it's not worth the stress. Others enjoy a bath and swimming around a bit. In those cases, you can offer them baths whenever you want. It's kind of a unique choice for each dragon. He will get most of his hydration from fresh veges and live bugs, but you can offer extra water by dripping it on his nose to lick up. If he is thirsty, he will tilt his head forward and lick at the water drops. Some of them will drink from a bowl. Sometimes it takes training by flicking at the water to create movement and grab their interest. Others don't drink from a bowl, and that's OK as long as they are eating well. The best indicator of hydration is to look at their poop. If there is excess water coming through and the poop and urate looks hydrated, that's a good sign. If the urate looks dry/chalky then it may indicate that some extra water is needed.

The amount he eats will vary. They eat more when they hit a growth spurt. And will often eat less during a shed or in between growth spurts. Offer a salad every day and a couple of bug meals per day up until about a year old. Then slowly taper down to 1 bug meal per day and then 2-3 bug meals per week by 18-24 months old. Adults should be eating mostly veges, but that is often a gradual transition. This is just a general guide though and each dragon will vary a bit. The key is to offer as much variety as you can in order for them to get plenty of nutrients. Having staples on hand that they like is good, but swap in some new stuff once in a while that's all.

The visible lights (basking light and UVB light) should follow the pattern of the sun and be off at night. If the temps inside the enclosure stay above about 65 or so overnight, then no additional heat is needed. If the enclosure gets colder than that, you can use a heat projector or ceramic heat emitter which will provide heat without visible light (which would disturb their sleep). A bit of a cooldown overnight is natural for them. You don't need to bump the heat much overnight. Just into the high 60s or low 70s is good.
thank you so much!
 
Top Bottom