Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orders".

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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Mon Oct 05, 2020 6:25 am

5 OCT NSW

NSW records Tenth day of no local virus cases for NSWwithout community transmission
Today, Sydneysiders are also celebrating the 85th anniversary of Luna Park and enjoyed summerlike daytime conditions on the Labor Day Holiday.

NSW has extended its streak of no COVID-19 community transmission, but health authorities are concerned by a drastic drop in testing rates.
For the tenth day in a row, NSW has recorded no new locally transmitted cases - only one case in a returned overseas traveller in hotel quarantine was diagnosed in the 24 hours to 8pm on Sunday.

But health authorities are concerned that only 4789 people were tested on Sunday, compared with 8,305 in the previous 24 hours.

Ideally, at least 8,000 people should be tested in NSW each day, health authorities say.

NSW Health's Dr Stephen Corbett said it was vital that anyone with even the mildest symptoms come forward for testing.

"If people don't come forward and get tested, we can't keep the pandemic at bay," he said on Monday.

"This is particularly important with school holidays and increased movement of people around the state."

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian is urging public servants to return to work in the city as the government looks to revive the COVID-19 disrupted economy.

"The health and safety of the people of NSW has always been our number one priority, however we are also focused on firing up the economy," she said.

"We are now encouraging public servants to physically return to work in their offices in a COVID-safe way, which will help stimulate city-based businesses and create more jobs across the state."

Managers will be encouraged to use flexible rostering and workers are asked to avoid using public transport during peak periods whenever possible.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/t ... d=msedgdhp

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW residents warned against complacency
The NSW Health Minister says low coronavirus numbers shouldn't lead to complacency within the community as the warm weather sees crowds surge in public places.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW Covid hotspots: list of Sydney and regional case locations
List of case locations in NSW
If you live in or have visited these local government areas in the past two weeks, get tested if you have any Covid-19 symptoms, even if mild, and self-isolate until you get your test result.

Campbelltown
Liverpool LGA
Parramatta LGA
There are currently no warnings for individual locations in NSW.

There is an alert for passengers and crew on a Jetstar Flight JQ510 flight from Melbourne at 11am on 27 September to Sydney. However, NSW Health say there is no ongoing risk of infection to the general public, and the majority of passengers on the flight are already undertaking mandatory hotel quarantine.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


OVER CROWDED BEACHES RAISE SERIOUS CONCERNS
Sydney beaches nearing capacity raising social distancing concerns
The first of Sydney's beaches has closed as temperatures rise above 30C and crowds cause concerns about social distancing.

North Cronulla has put up signs and is stopping people from coming on to the sand. People who are already on the beach are not yet being asked to leave.

It is a public holiday in NSW and many people have flocked to the coast to enjoy the day off and sunshine./
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Bondi Beach is nearing capacity and could be closed soon.
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Thousands of people at Coogee Beach in Sydney today.

Cronulla Beach main and all other Shire beaches are nearly full.

The beaches are at level two, which means they have not quiet reached capacity. Every 45 minutes there is an announcement telling people to social distance.

Further south in the Royal National Park near Wollongong the popular Wattamolla Beach has reached capacity, so the road in has been closed.

https://twitter.com/RandwickCouncil/sta ... 7353999360
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At Clovelly people appear to be spaced out on the concrete at the water's edge.

Nearby Garie Beach has also reached capacity, so Garie Road is closed.

Pictures also show Bondi and Coogee in Sydney's eastern suburbs crowded with people, while at Clovelly people appear to be more spaced out on the concrete.

Waverley Council warned about 1pm that Bondi Beach was set to close as it is almost full.
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People can be seen here on the sand and grass at Coogee.

"If people continue to come to Bondi Beach and crowds grow further, restricted access to the sand is likely to be implemented within the next hour 2-3pm," the council said in a statement.

"If you haven't left for the beach yet, please rethink your trip and check on capacity later in the day."

<< SIMILAR CALLS WERE MADE IN MARCH AND APRIL AND IGNORED AT THE TIME , RESULTING IN ALL BEACHES IN SYDNEY BEING CLOSED TO ALL.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Bondi Beach set to CLOSE as thousands flock to water despite COVID-19
Image

Some of Sydney's most famous beaches could be closed FROM Monday afternoon after tens of thousands of people flocked to the water, ignoring COVID-19 restrictions.

There was hardly any room to sunbake at Bondi Beach, with large crowds making the most of hot weather and the Labour Day public holiday.

Lifesavers at nearby Coogee Beach were warning beachgoers that unless a distance of 1.5 metres was maintained, they would consider closing the beach.

Similar scenes were a regular fixture along Sydney's eastern suburbs beaches at the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

And it seems that despite ten straight days of no community COVID-19 transmission in NSW, the threats of beach closures remain.
Image
BONDI
'If people continue to come to Bondi Beach and crowds grow further, restricted access to the sand is likely to be implemented within the next hour 2-3pm,' Waverley Council said in a statement.

'If you haven't left for the beach yet, please rethink your trip and check on capacity later in the day.'

Randwick City Council, which controls Coogee and Maroubra Beaches, advised keen swimmers to make other plans.
'If you're already in the area, enjoy the warm weather at our beachside parks and reserves, or support local businesses by visiting stores in our town centres.'

The massive influx of people to Bondi and Coogee beaches is being affected by the partial closure of Bronte Beach, which is located in between.

A sewage overflow issue saw the south end of the beach closed, while the Murray Rose Pools were also shut.


https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... hp#image=4

ASSISTING BUILDING INDUSTRY IN NSW
NSW to receive $2.7 billion road boost as part of federal budget
Image
An upgrade of the Prospect Highway in Western Sydney will be prioritised.

The NSW Hunter Region and Western Sydney will see their roads upgraded sooner as part of the Federal Government's commitment to fast-track $2.7 billion on state infrastructure.

The Federal Government has brought forward its investment into NSW roads as part of tomorrow's federal budget which is expected to see immense spending in all sectors of the economy.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said he was focused on injecting some health back into the COVID-19 ravaged NSW economy.

"This latest investment will provide another boost to the local economy and is part of our plan to support an estimated 8,000 direct and indirect jobs across the state," he said.

The following roads will be among those being fast-tracked:

$560 million for the Singleton Bypass on the New England Highway
$360 million for the Newcastle Inner City Bypass between Rankin Park and Jesmond
$120 million for an upgrade of the Prospect Highway in Western Sydney
$491 million for the Coffs Harbour Bypass
Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack said the spending would be fast-tracked as part of a previously announced 10-year plan of $100 billion in road infrastructure.

He said he had been in contact with the Berejiklian Government to discuss the projects and wanted the state to pledge money too.

"We want state and territory governments to invest as well, that's why I contacted all the state governments last night to tell them about this approach," he said.

"They absolutely know we've brought forward money even from last year's mid-year economic fiscal outlook."

The Prospect Highway has been at capacity for over a year and average travel speed during peak periods is about 30 kilometres per hour.

The single lane road will become a four-lane divided highway with the additional funding as it prepares for major traffic volume growth over the next 25 years.

Singleton Mayor Sue Moore said the bypass on the New England Highway would be of huge benefit to the town, removing traffic and trucks from the main street.

"It's great news, absolutely great news to hear that we've got substantial funding for the bypass," she said.

"The detailed design plan will obviously take two years, but funding on the board now and we'll get on and build the bypass as soon as possible."

Newcastle Deputy Lord Mayor Declan Clausen said it had been a long wait for funding for the final stage of the Newcastle Inner City Bypass.

He said money had been promised in the NSW budget every year since 2014.

"This is certainly welcome funding for the region, this has been a road project that has long been promised, going back very many decades, and will deliver substantial improvements for commuters coming from the south into Newcastle and further north."

Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole said the upgrades would be fantastic for commuters, especially for those in regional areas, but most importantly they would provide much needed jobs.

"The Federal Government and the State Government have been working very closely together, talking about the projects that are going to make the biggest difference on the ground to those local communities."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/markets ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Mon Oct 05, 2020 6:46 am

5 OCT QLD
No new cases in Queensland
Queensland recorded another day of zero coronavirus cases, leaving six active cases across the state.

Speaking in Wacol, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said it was more good news for the state.

"Everyone should be very happy today on this wonderful public holiday where we have zero new cases in Queensland," she said.

"So well done and I'm quite sure families right throughout Queensland are going to be very happy with that result."

It comes as authorities brace for congestion at the state's border checkpoints as the long weekend draws to a close.

Speaking on ABC Radio Brisbane, Chief Superintendent Mark Wheeler said traffic had been "flowing very well" at the Queensland-New South Wales checkpoint but delays were expected on Monday afternoon.

"The Gold Coast Highway and the M1 aren't experiencing delays at all ... it's a good result for this morning but I anticipate that will change this afternoon though," he said.

Chief Superintendent Wheeler said many people took advantage of the border zone extension into parts of northern New South Wales last Thursday.

"There were larger than normal numbers and we did experience peak delays of up to about 40 minutes," he said.

"One issue we did experience was many, many Queenslanders turning up to our borders from the New South Wales side [who] simply did not have a pass," he said.

"There is an assumption there that if you're a Queenslander that you don't actually need a border pass — that is incorrect," he said.

Since October 1, a total of 220 people were turned around at road checkpoints.

A total of 1,993 tests were conducted in the last 24 hours.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/brisbane ... d=msedgdhp

Rockhampton nurse who tested positive to COVID-19 cleared of wrongdoing
Turkey and Russia's deepening roles in Libya complicate peace efforts
If you can’t wait one more sleep, here is tomorrow’s news today
9News.com.au logoRockhampton nurse who tested positive to COVID-19 cleared of wrongdoing

A Rockhampton nurse who sparked a partial evacuation of an aged care facility when she tested positive for coronavirus did not breach the COVID-19 directive for aged care, Queensland Health says.

Queensland Health Director-General Dr John Wakefield ordered an extensive investigation into the conduct of the nurse who worked at the North Rockhampton Nursing Centre while infected with COVID-19 in May this year.

"The investigation found the nurse did not breach Aged Care Direction Number Three," Dr Wakefield said in a statement today.

"The investigation also found the public health response to the case was appropriate, with health officials working extremely well and conscientiously to prevent an outbreak at the centre."

The report, released this afternoon, found the nurse was "not experiencing a temperature or symptoms of acute respiratory infection" when she attended work from the 5th to the 8th of May.

The report noted the woman described having "an itchy throat with no fever".

She had mild symptoms when she worked those four days but the investigator found "nothing (in the aged care direction number 3) specifically required the nurse not to attend work" while awaiting test results.

Investigators found the woman "had not received relevant education and memoranda" and genuinely held the view she would not need to self-isolate, having already self-isolated for 14 days from an overseas trip.

"While the above matters may be difficult to believe ... the investigators find the subject officer's views were genuinely held," the report reads.

The investigators also found it was likely the woman contracted COVID-19 overseas.

The report also found there was "insufficient information to substantiate" allegations the nurse acted in a manner that exposed the aged care facility residents and employees to COVID-19.

It also noted there was some doubt about whether the nurse was in an infectious stage of COVID-19 when she attended work from the 5th to the 8th of May and on May 14.

"Accordingly, the Investigators are not able to determine whether the subject officer exposed residents and employees of NRNC to COVID-19," the report read.

Dr Wakefield said the nurse had been notified of the findings.

The nurse was suspended from her position, pending the outcome of a Crime and Corruption Commission investigation.

"Queensland Health has left no stone unturned in taking steps to keep Queenslanders safe since the very beginning of this pandemic," Dr Wakefield said.

"We have taken every opportunity to apply what we have learned, including from this event, for the benefit of Queenslanders.

"This includes changes to staffing and pandemic leave, pre-shift screening, training, infection control procedures, and, of course, swift and effective action in the event of a case.

"It is these actions, along with our culture of continuous learning and improvement, that has kept COVID out of our residential aged care facilities."
Queensland Health releases findings into Rockhampton aged care nurse who worked while infectious with coronavirus
Queensland Health investigation has found a Rockhampton nurse did not breach any aged care directives when she worked in an aged care home while infectious with COVID-19.

The nurse was showing symptoms while working at the North Rockhampton Nursing Centre (NRNC) in central Queensland and had recently returned from a trip to Brisbane when she tested positive.

The investigation also found the nurse did not expose residents or other employees at NRNC to the virus.

Queensland Health director-general Dr John Wakefield said the public health response was "appropriate, with health officials working extremely well and conscientiously to prevent an outbreak at the centre".

"The investigation found the nurse did not breach Aged Care Direction No.3," he said.

The report on the investigation found the nurse's treatment at work "before and during May and while the subject officer's employment has been suspended could have been more respectful and caring".

At the time of her positive result, the Queensland Nurses and Midwives' Union (QNMU) called for calm and respect while the investigations into the Central Queensland cases are carried out and labelled it "a disgusting political witch-hunt".

The nurse told investigators at the time she underwent a COVID-19 test her GP "did not consider the … test necessary".

"Neither the GP or pathology lab worker who took the swab advised the SO to self-isolate while awaiting the test results," the report stated.

It said the nurse "did not contemplate" the possibility of having COVID-19 because she had already self-isolated for 14 days after returning from an overseas trip.

"The subject officer telephoned the CQHHS [Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service] roster centre before attending for work and asked if the subject officer should attend work given the subject officer was waiting for a test result for COVID-19," the report noted.

"The subject officer did not receive a response to the subject officer's question from the roster centre."

Dr Wakefield said there had been changes to staffing, pandemic leave, pre-shift screening and infection control procedures following the incident in May.

"We have taken every opportunity to apply what we have learned, including from this event, for the benefit of Queenslanders," he said.

No new cases in Queensland
Queensland recorded another day of zero coronavirus cases, leaving six active cases across the state.

Speaking in Wacol, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said it was more good news for the state.

"Everyone should be very happy today on this wonderful public holiday where we have zero new cases in Queensland," she said.

"So well done and I'm quite sure families right throughout Queensland are going to be very happy with that result."

It comes as authorities brace for congestion at the state's border checkpoints as the long weekend draws to a close.

Speaking on ABC Radio Brisbane, Chief Superintendent Mark Wheeler said traffic had been "flowing very well" at the Queensland-New South Wales checkpoint but delays were expected on Monday afternoon.

"The Gold Coast Highway and the M1 aren't experiencing delays at all ... it's a good result for this morning but I anticipate that will change this afternoon though," he said.

Chief Superintendent Wheeler said many people took advantage of the border zone extension into parts of northern New South Wales last Thursday.

"There were larger than normal numbers and we did experience peak delays of up to about 40 minutes," he said.

"One issue we did experience was many, many Queenslanders turning up to our borders from the New South Wales side [who] simply did not have a pass," he said.

"There is an assumption there that if you're a Queenslander that you don't actually need a border pass — that is incorrect," he said.

Since October 1, a total of 220 people were turned around at road checkpoints.

A total of 1,993 tests were conducted in the last 24 hours.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Month-long mystery of woman abandoned at Queensland hospital is SOLVED
Image
The identity of a frail, elderly woman (pictured) found by the side of the road on Queensland's Sunshine Coast has been confirmed after she regained the ability to talk and nurses and doctors gained her trust.
The month-long hunt to find the identity of a frail, elderly woman found by the side of the road on Queensland's Sunshine Coast has come to an end.

The woman, believed to be in her 80s, was picked up by a driver Mooloolah Valley on September 6 and dropped outside Nambour Hospital.

Her identity remained a mystery for weeks, with police initially unable to ask the woman who she was because she was suffering a 'challenging health situation'.

But on Sunday Queensland Police revealed that the woman recently began talking and revealed her identity to them.

They declined to disclose her identity for personal reasons.

'The woman recently began speaking with police and has clearly indicated she is aware of her identity and does not wish to disclose this information for personal reasons,' the police statement read.

'As no criminality has been detected, police have ceased involvement in this matter and the woman will be left in the care of Queensland Health.'

Investigators issued a number of alerts in a bid to reunite the woman with her family after she was found, saying the situation was unique and almost like a reverse missing person's case.

She started talking with people after she was transferred to Sunshine Coast University Hospital and her health improved.

Police Inspector Matt Robertson says the woman was in a vulnerable situation and 'very frail', requiring medical treatment.

The man who found the woman took her to hospital and told staff he didn't know her and had no reason to think he was doing anything except helping her.

'He came in, he stated exactly what occurred and at this stage the evidence suggests what he said occurred,' Inspector Robertson said, according to the ABC.

'He does believe he might have seen her in the area before.'

They do think there may be a story to tell however and the missing piece was a 'puzzle'.

Police released an image of her ring in the hopes it would help someone identity the woman.

'Our primary investigation is just to locate who this lady is to reunite her with her family,' Inspector Robertson said.

Police have been unable to ask the woman who she is because she has been suffering a 'challenging health situation', although she is improving after being transferred to Sunshine Coast University Hospital.

Inspector Robertson said she was now able to communicate verbally and have conversations with people.

'It's not something where we've been able to go charging in very quickly with and we're taking it one step at a time and exploring those avenues as she's capable,' he said.

Officers had put out a call for public assistance after trying many lines of inquiry.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


Qld Labor launches official campaign with ad defending border closures
Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk is standing by her decision to implement Queensland’s hard border closures during the pandemic as Labor launches an official campaign promotional clip addressing the topic.

Ex-PM Sharif, daughter face sedition charges for criticising Pakistani military
If you can’t wait one more sleep, here is tomorrow’s news today
Sky News Australia logoQld Labor launches official campaign with ad defending border closures

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk is standing by her decision to implement Queensland’s hard border closures during the pandemic as Labor launches an official campaign promotional clip addressing the topic.

Qld Labor launches official campaign with ad defending border closures
Ms Palaszczuk and Opposition Leader Deb Frecklington will go head-to-head when the state election campaign officially launches on Tuesday and Australians will for the first time see the two female politicians facing off in a debate.

Queensland Labor launched their official campaign ad on Sunday night, which featured Ms Palaszczuk defending her border decisions.

“I had to make tough decisions recently, closing borders was a big step. But my first job has to be protecting Queensland lives,” she said.

“I make no apologies for that”.

Jobs, restarting the state’s troubled economy and the coronavirus will be prominent topics in the election campaign.

Queenslanders will head to the polls on October 31.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/ql ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Mon Oct 05, 2020 7:16 am

5 OCT WA

HELPING INTRA & SOON INTERSTATE TOURISM IN THE REGIONS
WA Government to subsidise more flights to Broome, Exmouth & Kununurra
Thousands of subsidised flights are now available to WA's north to help its tourism industry survive the low season as the state remains closed off to the rest of the world.

The WA Government has struck a deal with Virgin Australia and Qantas to provide 50,000 seats over a 12-month period to and from Perth to Broome, Exmouth and Kununurra.

Premier Mark McGowan said it was the largest regional flight deal in the state's history and provided a "vital economic boost" to the region "hardest hit by COVID-19".

"This will ensure those communities will have affordable airfares over the traditional down time ... and this will ensure that more Western Australians are able to travel to our regions to enjoy the amazing and unique tourism experiences," Mr McGowan said.

From November, 18,000 one-way flights to Exmouth are available from $149 in the low season and $169 in the high season.

A further 20,000 one-way Virgin Australia flights to Broome from November are $199.

From March to September next year, flights to Kununurra are available for $249.

"It will also mean locals in those parts of Western Australia can access these fares and also come down to the city," Mr McGowan said.

Tourism Council of WA chief executive Evan Hall said it would come as welcome relief for operators in the north who are yet to reopen.

"This deal will drive bookings for tourism businesses for next year's peak season, and give them the confidence to open up again," Mr Hall said.

Flights to boost CBD hotel occupancy
Tourism Minister Paul Papalia said it would also encourage locals in the regions to head to Perth where the inner-city hotel industry was struggling.

"The big city hotels are probably the one sector ... suffering the most," he said.

"Having said that ... I know the big hotels that aren't COVID isolation sites, are doing over 80 per cent (occupancy) on the weekends.

"During the week it's more like 15 to 18 per cent so it averages out about 60 per cent plus, that's not bad in a COVID world."

It was not revealed how much the flight deal had cost WA taxpayers but follows a similar deal struck in July where 8,000 flights were subsidised to Broome and Kununurra.

Those flights sold within one week of being released.

Australia's North West tourism chief executive Natasha Mahar said the entire Kimberley region would benefit from the additional flights.

"It will be interesting to see how quickly these sell out," Ms Mahar said.

"It goes to show as soon as there are some reasonable, affordable airfares to the Kimberley, people want to come here.

"It's their bucket list dream … here's hoping that can continue for us because it really does make a difference for all of the businesses throughout the region when there are affordable flights."

Premier defends Budget spend
The sweetener comes ahead of Thursday's state budget and after the Government had already revealed it would include a $600 power bill credit for every WA household.

But with WA expected to remain in the black despite the impacts of the pandemic, the Premier was pressed on whether the state was spending enough on supporting struggling households and businesses.

"Our economic management over this period has been very, very strong compared to anywhere else in Australia," Mr McGowan said.

"On top of that, we launched ... the recovery plan, that was a $5.5 billion investment, in payroll tax cuts, in freezing fees and charges, in important infrastructure all over the state.

"We're doing everything we can to stimulate the economy, to get jobs back."

The McGowan Government is spending $5.5 billion on its COVID-19 WA Recovery Plan to help drive economic and social recovery.

Federal Finance Minister Mathias Cormann was asked on Monday morning whether it was irresponsible for the State Government to deliver a surplus.

"At a moment of crisis like this, and this is a one-in-100-year crisis when a lot of businesses and a lot of people are suffering," Senator Cormann said.

"It is responsibility of government to step up, support the economy and support jobs and I certainly think across the country at all levels of government we all need to do what we can to ensure everyone has the best possible opportunity to get safely to the other side."

Meanwhile, WA has reported one new case of COVID-19 overnight, bringing the number of active cases to 16.

The man in his 30s travelled to Perth from Dubai and is currently in hotel quarantine.

'Definitely a good start': Tourism operators
East Kimberley boat cruise operator Dylan Lodge said the cheaper flights were "fantastic" and hoped they would have a big impact on business recovery.

"We know personally that the demand is there, we expect to see a big uptake," Mr Lodge said.

"Definitely, it's a good start. I mean, opening up the borders is going to be key for us up here though."

Mr Lodge said Triple J Tours had been "decimated" as a result of COVID-19.

"We're down … just over 90 per cent in terms of foot traffic through our personal business," Mr Lodge said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

WA Premier admits state more vulnerable to an outbreak
<< simply because very few West Australians have been exposed to the virus , a cost of being successful at eliminating community transmission .>>
Mark McGowan is under pressure to re-open Western Australia's borders to low-risk states as Victoria's numbers continue to fall and infections remain low elsewhere.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

WESTERN AUSTRALIANS TO GET FREE ELECTRIC FOR THE END OF YEAR

Western Australians to get free electricity in McGowan bid to boost economy
The Western Australian Government has promised to ease cost of living pressures on every household across the state by offering up to $600 of free electricity.

Premier Mark McGowan today said the incentive will allow Western Australians to have the confidence to spend money over the Christmas period while also supporting local businesses and helping kickstart the state's economy.

The credited money will be added to a household's next power bill to cover, on average, four months' worth of electricity.

The plan will be funded by the liquidation payout received from Alan Bond's Bell Group, which recovered $650 million of taxpayer money that was tied up in legal battles.

"That was 30 years of struggle, funded by the West Australian taxpayers," Mr McGowan said.

There are no hidden conditions attached to the subsidy, meaning that even WA's richest residents — such as Gina Rinehart and Andrew 'Twiggy' Forrest — will automatically receive the payout.

That aspect of the initiative has seen some question its effectiveness.

"In this current economic climate, we spend every dollar wisely. We must target it at those households who need it most and are most likely to spend it," Aaron Morey from the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Western Australia told 9News.

The state opposition has also slammed the plan, saying it isn't enough.

"This is basically returning taxpayers' money back to them," Shadow Cost of Living Minister Tony Krsticveic said.

"This $600 is nowhere near enough to get Western Australian families on their feet."

You can get up-to-date information from the Federal Government's Coronavirus Australia app, available on the App Store, Google Play and the Government's WhatsApp channel.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


5 OCT SA

South Australia records new coronavirus case in hotel quarantine
Key points:
The man who tested positive no-longer has an active infection
South Australia now has one known active case of COVID-19
Patrons can now drink alcohol while standing up outdoors at licensed venues

South Australia has recorded one new case of the coronavirus in a man recently returned from overseas, but SA Health has said it is an "old" infection.

The 20-year-old man returned a positive test while in hotel quarantine, where he has been since he arrived in Adelaide.

SA Health said his case represented an old, inactive infection that posed no risk to the state.

But the case was not picked up while the man was overseas and it has therefore been counted towards South Australia's total.

The department said in a short statement today that there was now only one active case in South Australia.

SA's only known active case is also in quarantine
On Friday, authorities announced new cases of the virus had been diagnosed in man and a woman who were staying in hotel quarantine in Adelaide.

SA Health said subsequent testing confirmed only one of those two people had an active case.

The other person, like the man whose case was announced today, had an old, inactive infection.

Nonetheless, the diagnosis brings South Australia's cumulative total since the pandemic began to 466.

Restrictions ease to allow 'vertical consumption'
The latest easing of coronavirus restrictions for South Australia, affecting bars, pubs, clubs and private events including weddings, came into force yesterday.

People in SA can now drink alcohol while standing up in outdoor areas in licensed venues.

A cap of 150 guests remains on private functions such as weddings, but guests can now dance, as well as drink while standing up — an activity Premier Steven Marshall referred to as "vertical consumption".

"For licensed premises, we will now allow vertical consumption outdoors … previously we've only allowed for seated consumption," Premier Steven Marshall said as he announced the change on Friday.

Dancing remains off limits outside of private functions.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-04/ ... e/12730848

5 OCT NT

NT flags reopening to regional Victoria in four weeks

The Northern Territory will reopen its borders to regional Victoria in four weeks on the proviso daily coronavirus case numbers continue to drop.

Chief Minister Michael Gunner announced the change today, saying it was something “that’s likely to happen but not something we are confirming today”.

He revealed four regions outside Metropolitan Melbourne would remain classified as coronavirus hotspots until further investigations could be held into the level of community transmission.

The areas included Greater Geelong, the Macedon Ranges, Mitchell Shire and East Gippsland Shire.

Mr Gunner said the NT was confident in reopening to most of regional Victoria as there were a total of three active cases and a daily case average of 0.3.

“All the numbers basically amount to this, regional Victoria has crushed the coronavirus,” he said.

“The critical factor for making this decision is regional Victoria’s success in easing their restrictions without spreading the virus.

“They are stepping out of lockdown while still staying safe.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/nt ... d=msedgdhp

NT Government sets out plan to open borders to regional Victoria from November
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ABC Health logoNT Government sets out plan to open borders to regional Victoria from November

People living in almost all of regional Victoria will be able to travel freely to the Northern Territory from November 2 if coronavirus cases remain low, the NT Government has announced.

Greater Geelong, the Macedon Ranges and the Mitchell and East Gippsland shires are not currently included in the plan, but are likely to be added if there is no community transmission from recent cases.

NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner said regional Victoria's rolling daily average caseload — 0.3 in the past fortnight — led health authorities to recommend its hotspot status be revoked.

"The critical factor for making this decision is regional Victoria's success in easing their restrictions without spreading the virus," he said.

"They are stepping out of lockdown while still staying safe."

The four-week timeframe will allow health authorities to track the regional caseload over two full virus replication cycles.

"I know some Territorians will be concerned about letting any Victorians in without quarantining," Mr Gunner said.

"I should remind anyone who may be concerned, this is the exact same plan we implemented in New South Wales and it has worked.

"It's not today, it's not tomorrow, it's in four weeks, and only if they keep progressing well."

A hotspot declaration for Greater Sydney is due to be lifted on Friday.

No date for Melbourne arrivals
All of Victoria is currently a government-declared coronavirus hotspot, meaning anyone arriving in the NT from that state is required to undergo two weeks of supervised quarantine at a cost of $2,500.

The revocation will mean regional Victorians can travel freely to the territory for the first time since hard borders were implemented for domestic travel more than six months ago.

The government declared all of Victoria a coronavirus hotspot in early July — days before its border opened to most states and the ACT.

Health authorities have not provided a timeline for when the NT border will re-open to metropolitan Melbourne.

But Mr Gunner said he was pleased with the city's declining caseload.

"Melbourne is continuing to look promising for us — it remains a watching brief," he said.

"We will need to see that progress continue as they step out of restrictions," he said.

Territorians urged to limit travel
Deputy Chief Health Officer Charles Pain said health authorities will study the epidemiology of recent cases in regional Victoria before deciding whether to allow travel from the four remaining regional areas.

"What we're looking for is no unexplained cases, and we also want to know that the measures in place are reasonable to control those," Dr Pain said.

"We're very confident in all of those cases that they're explainable and they're under control."

Despite the gradual re-opening of the NT border to the rest of Australia, Mr Gunner again urged locals to reconsider any interstate travel.

"As we gradually remove hotspots and allow more people to travel to the territory, I understand Territorians will also want to do the same thing," he said.

"My advice remains the same: think twice about it; think hard about it."

He said new hotspot declarations could be drawn up at any time, and anyone visiting them would be required to quarantine upon their return to the NT.

Dr Pain appealed for locals to stay vigilant with virus containment measures as the border slowly re-opens.

"There is a relaxation when you've got alcohol around, and it's hard to deal with that," he said.

He said additional compliance measures — including installing specialist personnel at licensed venues — were likely to be introduced in coming weeks.

The government anticipates its latest revocation will provide a welcome boost to the ailing local tourism sector, which has struggled to survive ongoing border closures.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

THE NORTHERN WET SEASON WILL BE A BIG ONE AND HAS STARTED EARLY

Northern Territory on flood watch as it prepares for biggest rainfall in years
Significant rain is expected over the coming days across southern parts of the Northern Territory as a slow-moving low pressure trough, fed with tropical moisture, lingers over the region.

Tuesday is expected to be the wettest day this week, and predicted rain would represent the best falls in months, and potentially, in years.

The system will also bring the mercury to winter-like maximum temperatures. These heavy falls may result in significant stream rises and flash-flooding.

Onshore winds are triggering showers along the Queensland coast and southwest WA.

Clearer skies elsewhere under a high with warm winds in NSW.

Here's the weather across Australia on Monday October 5, 2020.

THE NATIONAL FORECAST
Queensland
Mostly sunny, mild-to-warm in the southeast. Clearing shower, warm in the northeast. Sunny, very warm in the northwest. Mostly sunny, warm in the southwest.

Brisbane will be mostly sunny, with a low of 16C and a top of 27C.

There's a strong wind warning for Peninsula Coast and Cooktown Coast.

NSW & THE ACT
Mostly sunny, warm in the northeast. Late shower, warm in the southeast. Mostly sunny, cool-to-mild in the northeast. Late shower, cool-to-mild in the southeast.

Sydney and Canberra both have cloud increasing today, with temperatures up to 31C in Sydney, and 25C in Canberra.

There's a severe weather warning for damaging winds in the Snowy Mountains and alpine areas above 1900 metres, with winds expected to ease later today — see more information here.

https://twitter.com/weatherzone/status/ ... 7493714944
Victoria
Showers easing, cold in the southwest. Showers, cold in the southeast. Clearing shower, cool-to-cold in the northwest. Showers, cool-to-cold in the northeast.

Parts of Victoria had their hottest day yesterday since February, reaching 37C at Swan Hill and Mildura.

Melbourne has rain on the way today, with temperatures between 9C and 15C.

There's a warning for damaging winds in East Gippsland, North East and West and South Gippsland, which are expected to ease later today — see more information here.

Tasmania
Showers easing, cold in the southwest. Clearing shower, cool in the southeast. Clearing shower, cool-to-cold in the northwest. Rain, cold in the northeast.

Showers are easing in Hobart, with a low of 7C and top of 15C.

A slow moving rain band is crossing Tasmania, bringing rainfall statewide.

In the past 24 hours only small amounts of rainfall have been recorded over the North Esk Catchment, and there is a minor flood warning for the North Esk River. Strong and dangerous flows may be hazard over coming days — see more information here.

South Australia
Clearing shower, cold in the southeast. Mostly sunny, cool-to-cold in central. Late shower, cool-to-cold in the west. Windy, cool-to-cold in the north.

Adelaide has a possible shower coming, with a low of 9C and top of 17C.

There's a warning to sheep graziers in Mount Lofty Ranges, Lower Eyre Peninsula, Eastern Eyre Peninsula, Yorke Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, Flinders, Mid North, Murraylands, Upper South East and Lower South East forecast districts. Cold temperatures, rain and showers and fresh southerly winds are expected to continue into this morning. There is a risk of losses of lambs and sheep exposed to these conditions.

Western Australia
Sunny, cool-to-mild in the southwest. Mostly cloudy, cool-to-cold in the south. Windy, warm in the northwest. Mostly sunny, very warm in the northeast.

Perth will be sunny today, with a low of 6C and top of 21C.

There's a strong wind warning for West Kimberley Coast, Pilbara Coast East, Pilbara Coast West, Ningaloo Coast, Gascoyne Coast and Geraldton Coast.

Northern Territory
Showers easing, very warm in the northwest Top End. Clearing shower, mild-to-warm in Arnhem. Late shower, warm over the interior. Rain, cool-to-cold in the south.

Darwin has a possible thunderstorm, with temperatures between 25C and 33C.

There's a flood watch warning for Macdonnell Ranges And Simpson Desert from tomorrow — see more information here.

Many roads in the flood watch area can be expected to be affected from Tuesday and become impassable. Some communities and homesteads may become isolated.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


5 OCT TAS
Image
LAST YEAR
Key points:
The Tasmanian Government now concedes the Taste of Tasmania festival cannot proceed
Coronavirus limitations on public gatherings are "too great", the council said
Fireworks are still planned, subject to health advice

Hopes for a scaled-down Taste of Tasmania festival for Hobart have been dashed, with the city's council saying it's been unable to source a viable replacement.

The Taste, a week-long food and wine showcase at the end of December, and a key event on Hobart's social calendar for more than 30 years — was cancelled in its usual form in May due to uncertainty around the COVID-19 pandemic.

At the time, there were hopes the festival would go ahead as a different, smaller event.

Coronavirus has led to the cancellation of several festivals in Tasmania, including the Dark Mofo winter festival.

In July, the Tasmanian Government called for expressions of interest in staging a modified Taste of Tasmania — but acting Premier Jeremy Rockliff said in a statement that was now deemed impossible.

Planning for the proposed smaller event was on the basis that restrictions might have been eased considerably by the end of the year.

"After working with the Hobart City Council, it's become clear that following an end of year event submission process announced in July, that a modified 'Taste' style event cannot proceed this summer in the current environment as we continue to respond to the risk posed by COVID-19 and large gatherings," he said.

Hobart City Council general manager Nick Heath said the expression of interest process attracted about a dozen submissions.

"The uncertainty around COVID-19, on large gatherings around the waterfront just made it impossible for us to commit to an event this year," Mr Heath said.

"I think the Tasmanian community genuinely appreciates that all the decisions being made at the moment have been putting their safety and the safety of anyone coming into the state first.

"Fireworks, the Taste of Tasmania, large gatherings of the waterfront are no different, I think people do appreciate that decisions are being made in their best interests."

n July, the Tasmanian Government called for expressions of interest in staging a modified Taste of Tasmania — but acting Premier Jeremy Rockliff said in a statement that was now deemed impossible.

Planning for the proposed smaller event was on the basis that restrictions might have been eased considerably by the end of the year.

"After working with the Hobart City Council, it's become clear that following an end of year event submission process announced in July, that a modified 'Taste' style event cannot proceed this summer in the current environment as we continue to respond to the risk posed by COVID-19 and large gatherings," he said.

Hobart City Council general manager Nick Heath said the expression of interest process attracted about a dozen submissions.

"The uncertainty around COVID-19, on large gatherings around the waterfront just made it impossible for us to commit to an event this year," Mr Heath said.

"I think the Tasmanian community genuinely appreciates that all the decisions being made at the moment have been putting their safety and the safety of anyone coming into the state first.

"Fireworks, the Taste of Tasmania, large gatherings of the waterfront are no different, I think people do appreciate that decisions are being made in their best interests."

Image
The Taste usually attracts about 30,000 attendees each day

The council was still planning a New Year's Eve fireworks display, subject to public health advice.

"We will make further announcements on the fireworks when we have more definitive information," he said.

Alderman Zelinda Sherlock said options would be considered, such as discouraging people from gathering in the city, and instead viewing them from different vantage points around the city.

About 30,000 people attend the Taste each day with many greeting the fleet of the Sydney-Hobart Yacht Race as competitors sail into Constitution Dock.

Race organisers have not yet made an announcement about this year's event.

'We saw it coming'
Stallholder Mark Robertson from Lost Pippin ciders said while disappointing, "it's probably something we saw coming".

He said the company's revenue from Taste and other major festivals accounted for nearly 50 per cent of annual turnover.

"It's really difficult to replace an event like the taste … up until now it was Australia's largest and longest ongoing food and wine festival, so it's a real shame that this year we won't be having it," he said.

"The event has been crucial on our business and a lot of other small food businesses, wine businesses, cider businesses in establishing themselves.

Image
The Taste is a showcase for Tasmanian food and wine producers
Mr Robertson said he hoped authorities can ensure the event survives in the long-term.

"Those kind of festivals, close contact is just part of what they are, so as a festival [stallholder] we expect that festivals of that nature will probably be the last things to really come back," he said.

The State Government will spend $250,000 on a campaign to encourage Tasmanians to eat out and support local businesses over summer, as well as encouraging venues to expand their "outdoor footprint" where possible.

Mr Robertson said his company had already looked at that option.

"With the COVID situation in Tasmania and with visitors coming into the state soon, we'll be running our own series of events at the farm. We've taken it on ourselves to invite people out to the farm for the first time ever," he said.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-05/ ... d/12732380
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Mon Oct 05, 2020 7:49 am

5 OCT FEDERAL


GO FORTH AND PROCREATE
Image
Australia needs more of these.

Treasurer promotes more 'Australian births' as nation faces zero net migration
Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has encouraged Australians to boost “births across the country” as the nation faces the prospect of zero net migration over the next few years.

The closure of international borders will mean Australia's population growth will reach its lowest level in over 100 years.

Mr Frydenberg said “this is a function of immigration slowing but it’s also a function of a declining fertility rate which reflects the circumstances the country finds itself in with COVID-19”.

“People will obviously make decisions about the size of their family depending to some extent about how they feel about their economic prospects and the economic circumstances,” he admitted.

However, the treasurer stopped short of committing to a baby bonus in the October budget.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/tr ... d=msedgdhp




UNDERMINING CONSUMER PROTECTIONS IN THE FINANCE INDUSTRY
Under the cover of Covid, Morrison wants to scrap my government's protections against predatory lending
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The Guardian logoUnder the cover of Covid, Morrison wants to scrap my government's protections against predatory lending

Pardon me for being just a little suspicious, but when I see an avalanche of enthusiasm from such reputable institutions as the Morrison government, the Murdoch media and the Australian Banking Association (anyone remember the Hayne royal commission?) about the proposed “reform” of the National Consumer Credit Protection Act, I smell a very large rodent. “Reform” here is effectively code language for repeal. And it means the repeal of major legislation introduced by my government to bring about uniform national laws to protect Australian consumers from unregulated and often predatory lending practices.

The banks of course have been ecstatic at Morrison’s announcement, chiming in with the government’s political chimeric that allowing the nation’s lenders once again to just let it rip was now essential for national economic recovery. Westpac, whose reputation was shredded during the royal commission, was out of the blocks first in welcoming the changes: CEO Peter King said they would “reduce red tape”, “speed up the process for customers to obtain approval”, and help small businesses access credit to invest and grow.

And right on cue, Westpac shares were catapulted 7.2% to $17.54 just before midday on the day of announcement. National Australia Bank was up more than 6% at $18.26, ANZ up more than 5% at $17.76, and Commonwealth Bank was trading almost 3.5% higher at $66.49. The popping of champagne corks could be heard right around the country as the banks, once again, saw the balance of market power swing in their direction and away from consumers. And that means more profit and less consumer protection.

A little bit of history first. Back in the middle of the global financial crisis, when the banks came on bended knee to our government seeking sovereign guarantees to preserve their financial lifelines to international lines of credit, we acted decisively to protect them, and their depositors, and to underpin the stability of the Australian financial system. And despite a hail of abuse from both the Liberal party and the Murdoch media at the time, we succeeded. Not only did we keep Australia out of the global recession then wreaking havoc across all developed economies, we also prevented any single financial institution from falling over and protected every single Australian’s savings deposits. Not bad, given the circumstances.

But we were also crystal-clear with the banks and other lenders at the time that we would be acting to protect working families from future predatory lending practices. And we did so. The national consumer credit protection bill 2009 (credit bill) and the national consumer credit protection (fees) bill 2009 (fees bill) collectively made up the consumer credit protection reform package. It included:
Image

This reform was not dreamed up overnight. It gave effect to the Council of Australian Governments’ agreements of 26 March and 3 July 2008 to transfer responsibility for regulation of consumer credit, and a related cluster of additional financial services, to the commonwealth. It also implemented the first phase of a two-phase implementation plan to transfer credit regulation to the commonwealth endorsed by Coag on 2 October 2008. It was the product of much detailed work over more than 12 months.

Scott Morrison’s formal argument to turn all this on its head is that “as Australia continues to recover from the Covid-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever that there are no unnecessary barriers to the flow of credit to households and small businesses”.

But hang on. Where is Morrison’s evidence that there is any problem with the flow of credit at the moment? And if there were a problem, where is Morrison’s evidence that the proposed emasculation of our consumer credit protection law is the only means to improve credit flow? Neither he nor the treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, have provided us with so much as a skerrick. Indeed, the Commonwealth Bank said recently that the flow of new lending is now a little above pre-Covid levels and that, in annual terms, lending is growing at a strong pace.

More importantly, we should turn to volume VI of royal commissioner Kenneth Hayne’s final report into the Australian banking industry. Hayne, citing the commonwealth Treasury as his authority, explicitly concluded that the National Consumer Credit Protection Act has not in fact hindered the flow of credit but instead had provided system stability. As Hayne states: “I think it important to refer to a number of aspects of Treasury’s submissions in response to the commission’s interim report. Treasury indicated that ‘there is little evidence to suggest that the recent tightening in credit standards, including through Apra’s prudential measures or the actions taken by Asic in respect of [responsible lending obligations], has materially affected the overall availability of credit’.”

So once again, we find the emperor has no clothes. The truth is this attack on yet another of my government’s reforms has nothing to do with the macro-economy. It has everything to do with a Morrison government bereft of intellectual talent and policy ideas in dealing with the real challenge of national economic recovery. Just as it has everything to do with Frydenberg’s spineless yielding to the narrow interests of the banking lobby, using the Covid-19 crisis as political cover, in order to lift the profit levels of the banks while throwing borrowers’ interests to the wind.

This latest flailing in the wind by Morrison et al is part of a broader pattern of failed policy responses by the government to the economic impact of the crisis. Morrison had to be dragged kicking and screaming into accepting the reality of stimulus, having rejected RBA advice last year to do precisely the same – and that was before Covid hit. And despite a decade of baseless statements about my government’s “unsustainable” levels of public debt and budget deficit, Morrison is now on track to deliver five times the level of debt and six times the level of our budget deficit. But it doesn’t stop there. Having destroyed a giant swathe of the Australian manufacturing industry by destroying our motor vehicle industry out of pure ideology, Morrison now has the temerity to make yet another announcement about the urgent need now for a new national industry policy for Australia. Hypocrisy thy name is Liberal.

Notwithstanding these stellar examples of policy negligence, incompetence and hypocrisy, there is a further pattern to Morrison’s response to the Covid crisis: to use it as political cover to justify the introduction of a number of regressive measures that will hurt working families. They’ve used Covid cover to begin dismantling successive Labor government reforms for our national superannuation scheme, the net effect of which will be to destroy the retirement income of millions of wage and salary earners. They are also on the cusp of introducing tax changes, the bulk of which will be delivered to those who do not need them, while further eroding the national revenue base at a time when all fiscal discipline appears to have been thrown out the window altogether. And that leaves to one side what they are also threatening to do – again under the cover of Covid – to undermine wages and conditions for working families under proposed changes to our industrial relations laws.

The bottom line is that Morrison’s “reform” of the National Consumer Credit Law forms part of a wider pattern of behaviour: this is a government that is slow to act, flailing around in desperate search for a substantive economic agenda to lead the nation out of recession, while using Covid to further load the dice against the interests of working families for the future.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/un ... d=msedgdhp


COVID CREATED MORE PUBLIC SERVICE JOBS IN FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS.
Australian Public Service grew rapidly during COVID-19 lockdown, though most new jobs were temporary
The federal bureaucracy added almost 6,000 staff to its workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic as it scrambled to support Australia's ailing economy.

The Federal Government's main service agencies — the Tax Office and Services Australia, which oversees Centrelink and Medicare — employed most of the new recruits hired in the first half of this year.

These two agencies were left critically short-staffed when the coronavirus crisis unfolded, having collectively shed about 2,500 jobs in the latter half of 2019.

But the rapid expansion of the APS during the pandemic was the biggest jobs boom in the bureaucracy in 14 years, and followed steep cuts to the workforce since Julia Gillard was prime minister.

As well as the 5,770 extra public servants employed between January and June, the Government has likely hired thousands more via labour-hire firms and businesses contracts, though it does not report on that employment.

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/d1PMX/3/? ... mobile=375

However, most of the new APS employees were hired on temporary contracts.

About one in eight public servants are now "non-ongoing" employees — the highest rate ever reported.

Community and Public Sector Union national secretary Melissa Donnelly said she was pleased the APS workforce was expanding to cope with its extra workload.

"The issue is it's concentrated in non-ongoing employment, so it doesn't deal with the staffing capacity and long-term problems created by both budget and staffing cuts," she said.

"And it doesn't go far enough at all … to address the cuts we have seen since 2013.

"The public service still has … 12,000 fewer employees than it did then."

[chart APS temps]
Not only did the Tax Office and Services Australia launch a massive hiring campaign this year, they also benefited from an unprecedented "surge" within the APS to help unroll the Government's JobKeeper and JobSeeker payments.

More than 5,000 public servants were seconded from other departments to help the service agencies as they struggled to cope with the pandemic's effects.

Big-spending budget may protect APS jobs for now
Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has said he would spend big in this year's federal budget.

He indicated the Government would continue to try to prop up the economy until the jobless rate was "comfortably under 6 per cent" — a sign the APS is likely to be kept busy and spared from cuts for now.

Ms Donnelly said public servants were waiting "with bated breath" for Tuesday's budget announcements, and hoped the Government would realise that past cuts to the APS workforce had been counter-productive.

"We all remember those disastrous and distressing scenes of hundreds, thousands, of people lining up outside Centrelink offices," she said.

"The immediate and dire need of the community was really apparent.

"This is a long-term recession, this is a long-term social and economic problem that we're now dealing with.

"A focus on non-ongoing employment is not the way forward."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

HELPING SUPPORT THE STATES & REGROWING A NATION. << NOT EXACTLY A NEW "DEAL" FOR THE 2020s POST COVID GROBAL DEPRESSION.

Morrison to tip $1.1 billion of budget cash into WA economy
The Morrison government will tip $1.1 billion into West Australian roads and transport projects, to be announced in Tuesday's federal budget.

The additional funding will bring the amount spent on infrastructure in WA by the federal government in response to the coronavirus pandemic to $1.3 billion.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Tuesday's budget would support the government's JobMaker plan and help WA's economic recovery.

"We have been working closely with state and territory governments to invest in the infrastructure that is ready to go and can help rebuild our economy and create more jobs," Mr Morrison said.

"These projects will keep commuters safe on the road, get people home to their loved ones sooner and provide better transport links for urban and regional communities.

"This latest investment will provide another boost to the local economy and is part of our plan to support an estimated 6800 direct and indirect jobs across the state."

The funding will accelerate work on the Roe Highway/Great Eastern Highway Bypass and Abernethy Road/Great Eastern Highway Bypass Interchanges, and the Wheatbelt Secondary Freight Network.

WA Transport Minister Rita Saffioti welcomed the funding, which she said would help create thousands of local jobs and improve safety across the state.

She said the state government had worked well with the Commonwealth.

"We already have a pipeline of $6.5 billion of major road and rail works underway across Western Australia over the next two years - this will extend the pipeline of work and will continue to help the state economy through and past COVID-19," Ms Saffioti said.

But opposition transport minister Libby Mettam said the state government had to lift its game on project delivery.

"Almost all Metronet projects have so far missed every major milestone, with the overall blowouts for Stage 1 totalling more than $2 billion," she said.

"This is backed by recent Main Roads annual report figures which illustrate that contracts did not meet targets in terms of timing or cost in a number of key areas."

Ms Mettam said the state government still hadn't committed any money in the state budget for the Morley Ellenbrook Rail project.

Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said the funding, on top of the $1.5 billion Perth City Deal, would re-energise Perth.

"The newly announced City Deal is all about forging partnerships across levels of government to bring investment into the CBD, creating almost 10,000 jobs while encouraging more people back into the city to create flow on economic benefits for small businesses," he said.

"The government is driving the delivery of major infrastructure projects to map the economic road back from the pandemic, building the economy and providing certainty for business over the long term."

Since being elected in 2013, the Liberal and Nationals government has committed more than $15.4 billion for infrastructure in WA.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Government to inject $7.5 billion into infrastructure
The Federal Opposition is questioning whether the government will actually deliver on its promised infrastructure spending quickly enough for it to benefit the economy

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Coalition pressures states to deliver infrastructure projects or miss out on funds
The Morrison government is attempting to ratchet up political pressure on the states to quicken the pace of infrastructure projects to help kickstart the economic recovery, signalling it will focus federal resources on jurisdictions willing to cooperate and shun laggards.

Tuesday’s budget will contain tax cuts, concessions and investment incentives for business, and labour market assistance designed to help people into employment as income support delivered through jobkeeper and jobseeker tapers.

The government says the overriding objective of the 2020 budget is job creation, but the economic statement will also include new spending on aged care services – likely a boost to homecare packages.

The Coalition has also been telegraphing a sizeable spend on infrastructure to boost employment and economic activity, and there is speculation the budget will impose requirements on the states to get moving or lose commonwealth support.

The finance minister, Mathias Cormann, declared on Sunday the states needed to pick up the pace. “The general principle is where we make funding available to build important productivity-enhancing, economy-growing infrastructure, we want the states to get on with it,” he told Sky News.

“If the states are not able or willing to get on with it, then we will seek to work with states that are. If some states aren’t prepared to get cracking, then we will be working with those states that are”.

The Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, shrugged off the jawboning from Canberra on Sunday, telling reporters he was pursuing a $1.75bn infrastructure package with Scott Morrison. “No Victorian will be lectured from the commonwealth government about infrastructure, about building things,” Andrews said.

The government has been flagging for weeks it will use the budget to bring forward income tax cuts as part of efforts to stimulate demand in the economy, even though a range of economists think that strategy is a poor stimulus given Australian households are currently saving at record levels.

The government has legislated tax changes to take effect in 2022 and 2024 that it could pull forward. The stage three proposal previously scheduled to take effect in 2024-25 reduces the tax rate for those earning between $45,000 and $200,000 to 30 cents in the dollar.

With parliament set to resume for budget week, the shadow treasurer, Jim Chalmers, said on Sunday that Labor remains opposed to the stage three change.
Latest on the worldwide spread of coronavirus
Woman discovers new species of spider in her backyard
The Guardian logoCoalition pressures states to deliver infrastructure projects or miss out on funds


Video: NSW public sector wage boost slashed (Sky News Australia)

NSW public sector wage boost slashed

The Morrison government is attempting to ratchet up political pressure on the states to quicken the pace of infrastructure projects to help kickstart the economic recovery, signalling it will focus federal resources on jurisdictions willing to cooperate and shun laggards.

Scott Morrison et al. standing in front of a building: Photograph: Kelly Barnes/Getty Images© Provided by The Guardian Photograph: Kelly Barnes/Getty Images
Tuesday’s budget will contain tax cuts, concessions and investment incentives for business, and labour market assistance designed to help people into employment as income support delivered through jobkeeper and jobseeker tapers.


Related: Don't be fooled by the spin – Tuesday's budget will be political and ideologically driven | Greg Jericho

The government says the overriding objective of the 2020 budget is job creation, but the economic statement will also include new spending on aged care services – likely a boost to homecare packages.

The Coalition has also been telegraphing a sizeable spend on infrastructure to boost employment and economic activity, and there is speculation the budget will impose requirements on the states to get moving or lose commonwealth support.

The finance minister, Mathias Cormann, declared on Sunday the states needed to pick up the pace. “The general principle is where we make funding available to build important productivity-enhancing, economy-growing infrastructure, we want the states to get on with it,” he told Sky News.

Scott Morrison et al. standing in front of a building: There is speculation the Morrison government’s budget will impose requirements on the states to get moving or lose commonwealth support.© Photograph: Kelly Barnes/Getty Images There is speculation the Morrison government’s budget will impose requirements on the states to get moving or lose commonwealth support.
“If the states are not able or willing to get on with it, then we will seek to work with states that are. If some states aren’t prepared to get cracking, then we will be working with those states that are”.

The Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, shrugged off the jawboning from Canberra on Sunday, telling reporters he was pursuing a $1.75bn infrastructure package with Scott Morrison. “No Victorian will be lectured from the commonwealth government about infrastructure, about building things,” Andrews said.

The government has been flagging for weeks it will use the budget to bring forward income tax cuts as part of efforts to stimulate demand in the economy, even though a range of economists think that strategy is a poor stimulus given Australian households are currently saving at record levels.

The government has legislated tax changes to take effect in 2022 and 2024 that it could pull forward. The stage three proposal previously scheduled to take effect in 2024-25 reduces the tax rate for those earning between $45,000 and $200,000 to 30 cents in the dollar.

With parliament set to resume for budget week, the shadow treasurer, Jim Chalmers, said on Sunday that Labor remains opposed to the stage three change.

Related: Labor opposes tax cuts for wealthy but won't rule out passing them in budget package

Labor opposed stage three when the government presented it in 2019 but did not vote against it because it was brought to parliament in an omnibus bill.

The government is expected to pursue that strategy again, but there is an appetite in Labor to oppose the tax cuts for very high-income earners if there is an opportunity to do that without denying relief to low- and medium-income earners.

Chalmers told the ABC the stage three flattening of the tax scales was bad policy. Of the options the government had produced, stage three was “the least affordable, it’s the least responsible, it’s the least fair and it is the least likely to get a good return in the economy because higher income earners are less likely to spend in the economy”.

But Chalmers did not ruling out voting for the measure as Labor did in 2019. He said it was impossible at this point to be definitive. “We don’t know what the timing is, we don’t know if there are any additional measures that they intend to put up on Tuesday night”, he said.

In the leadup to budget week, the government has pre-announced a number of initiatives, including an extra $1.5bn for manufacturing, a $3.5bn upgrade to the national broadband network, funding to promote a “gas-led” recovery, removing the 47% fringe benefits tax (FBT) impost on the retraining businesses give redundant or redeployed workers, and the extension of some tax concessions for businesses with a turnover of between $10m and $50m.

On Sunday, the government confirmed that businesses prepared to take on new apprentices from Monday would be eligible for a 50% wage subsidy. The scheme – expected to cost $1.2bn – is capped at 100,000 subsidies and will be available to businesses of all sizes.

Labor welcomed the program but said it would not reverse the loss of apprentices and trainees evidenced during the Coalition’s period in government, and it would not fix the problem of income support through jobkeeper being withdrawn prematurely.

The budget is expected to contain the largest deficit in decades – more than $200bn. The treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, has argued the borrowing “can be paid back by growing the economy” and there is “no economic recovery without a jobs recovery”.

Frydenberg has confirmed that unemployment, now 6.8%, will be forecast to rise, although not to 10%, as was the prognosis some months back. He has also confirmed economic growth will be hit by a collapse in overseas migration.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


BIRD FLU SPREADING
Devastating bird flu outbreak in Victoria sees NSW prepare for the worst
Officials interstate are not taking any chances as the death toll from Australia's worst-ever avian influenza outbreak in Victoria continues to rise.

More than 460,000 birds have so far been destroyed as officials work to contain the outbreak.

NSW Department of Primary Industries Chief Veterinary Officer Sarah Britton said the threat could not be underestimated.

"This is probably the biggest avian influenza outbreak we have had in Australia," she said.

"In Victoria there have been seven premises, six of them being poultry premises."

A strain of the virus was first detected at a free-range egg farm in Lethbridge, north-west of Geelong, in late July.

Agriculture Victoria says three different strains of the virus have been detected, meaning that the outbreaks are not all connected.

Outbreaks in NSW rare
Outbreaks in New South Wales had been rare, but Dr Britton said tens of thousands of birds had been destroyed in the past decade after flocks became infected.

"There were outbreaks in 2012 in Maitland and 2013 in Young, but we have only had a couple of premises at any one time," she said.

"So this is way bigger than anything we have had previously."

In Maitland, about 50,000 layer hens were destroyed with quarantine zones put in place.

Biosecurity vets said they were monitoring wild bird populations across NSW, and other experts had also joined forces to keep it out.

"We've been very busy being prepared and this an ongoing threat for us," Dr Britton said.

"So in NSW we have put together an incident management team and that sets up for emergency responses."

That has reassured boutique Hunter Valley chicken farmer Jess "Farmer Jess" Pitkin, who has about 90 breeders and an additional 300 other birds on her farm.

"It is imperative to have that quick response," she said.

"Otherwise it can spread very quickly.

"These diseases can get around and be devastating and small operators like me don't have livestock insurance, so the cost is really big."

Biosecurity awareness
Ms Pitkin said the coronavirus pandemic had helped to shine a light on the importance of biosecurity measures.

She said biosecurity controls for humans could be replicated when it came to birds.

"I really think COVID has benefitted as we understand a bit more what biosecurity," she said.

"It is not a big scary word anymore and we know to isolate and we can relate that to our chickens."

In the meantime, she said she was limiting farm visits, taking extra caution with people with backyard chooks and asking customers to park their cars some distance from her farm gate.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

5 OCT NZ
Dozens of homes razed in New Zealand bushfires
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The blaze began in a remote mountain area in the South Island early on Sunday
Bushfires have destroyed dozens of homes in New Zealand, authorities said on Monday, saying it was a miracle no one was hurt when “a wall of orange” descended on a remote South Island village.

The blaze began in a mountain forest early on Sunday morning and, fanned by strong winds, swept through the village of Lake Ohau, forcing residents to flee for their lives.

According to the New Zealand fire emergency agency on Monday, at least 4,600 hectares (11,366 acres) of land were affected by the blaze, which also displaced more than 100 people.

“The high winds meant the fire could not yet be contained and the situation may change rapidly with any shift in the wind,” Fire and Emergency New Zealand said.

“At this stage we are confident that crews would have achieved 50 percent control of the fire perimeter by tomorrow night,” it added on Monday.

The agency said up to 50 structures were destroyed and conditions remained “challenging” on Monday, with 11 helicopters and nine fire crews attempting to contain the flames.

Assessment of the damage to homes was still underway.

Waitaki District mayor Gary Kircher said the tiny Lake Ohau community had been devastated.

“Of the 60 or 70 houses, we believe that the majority have gone,” he told Radio New Zealand.

“The reality is that it’s a minor miracle no one has been harmed. If it had been another 15-20 minutes, it would have been a very different story.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/do ... d=msedgdhp


NZ removes all COVID restrictions again
New Zealand is again relaxing COVID-19 restrictions, confident enough that its elimination strategy has worked a second time.

Four months after first eliminating the virus, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced on Monday Auckland would shift back to "level one" this week, joining the rest of the country.

Auckland was the centre of a fresh outbreak in August, which brought 179 new cases and three new deaths.

Case numbers have significantly dropped in recent weeks and on Monday health officials announced a 10th straight day without community transmission.

"All signs point to it now being under control," Ms Ardern said after chairing a virtual meeting of cabinet from Christchurch.

"Aucklanders and New Zealanders have stuck to the plan twice now and beat the virus again ... we put our heads down and got on with it.

"There is now a 95 per cent chance of the cluster being eliminated ... we are confident it has been contained."

Auckland's shift will take place at midnight on Wednesday.

It shows a growing appetite for risk-taking by Ms Ardern's government, which is likely to be re-elected on October 17.

In June, Ms Ardern moved New Zealand to level one after 40 days without community transmission; a month longer than has been recorded after the fresh outbreak.

New Zealand continues to record new cases within its border regime, with 22 international arrivals to test positive for the virus in the last week while in mandatory isolation.

New Zealand's COVID-19 death toll is 25.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/nz ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Posts: 12567
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Mon Oct 05, 2020 8:06 am

5 OCTOBER DATA

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CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Oct 06, 2020 7:34 am

6 OCT VIC

Victoria records 15 new coronavirus cases as Kilmore cafe worker tests positive to COVID-19
Two coronavirus cases in the regional Victorian town of Kilmore have been linked to a Melbourne resident who travelled to the north-east of the state while infectious.

Victoria recorded one more death and 15 new coronavirus cases overnight, including some linked to the Chadstone outbreak, which has become the state's largest active outbreak outside of the aged care sector.

Victoria's COVID-19 crisis by the numbers
One death, taking the state toll to 807 and the national figure to 895

* 15 new cases, including eight linked to known outbreaks and complex cases

* 14-day rolling case average 10.6 for Melbourne and 0.3 for regional Victoria

* Mystery cases from September 20 - October 3: 13 for Melbourne, none for regional Victoria

* 216 active cases for the state, including three for regional Victoria

* 21 people in hospital, with one in ICU and none on a ventilator

* 27 active cases involving healthcare workers

* 66 active cases linked to aged care

* More than 2.76 million test results returned, an increase of 9086 since Monday

* One active case in residential disability, a staff member

* 28 cases linked to The Butcher Club at Chadstone Shopping Centre, including eight staff, 11 members of the same family or household, four customers. One close contact visited a cafe at country Kilmore.

RESTRICTIONS

* Two-hour exercise limit within five kilometres of work or home

* A household, or maximum of five people from no more than two households, can gather outside

* Religious activities of up to five people, plus one faith leader for outdoor gatherings and ceremonies, are permitted

* From October 12, Melbourne primary school, special school and VCAL students will return to classroom learning

* Gap of just under two weeks before the next easing of Melbourne restrictions (October 19 at the earliest).

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp

There are now 28 cases linked to the Butcher Club at Chadstone, up from 24 yesterday, Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton said.

The cluster includes eight Butcher Club staff members, 11 family and household contacts of the cases and four customers who visited the shop.

Two people in Kilmore, in the Mitchell Shire about 60 kilometres north of Melbourne, have also tested positive after a case connected to the Chadstone outbreak travelled to regional Victoria last week.

One of those people was a staff member at the Oddfellows Cafe, which was listed as a "high risk" exposure site after the Melbourne resident with COVID-19 dined there while infectious last Wednesday.

Professor Sutton said the second Kilmore person to test positive was also a close contact of the Melbourne resident.

He said the Melbourne resident was permitted to travel into regional Victoria for work, but was required to abide by the restrictions in place in Melbourne, meaning they should have bought takeaway food instead of dining at the cafe.

Professor Sutton said he did not believe the Melbourne resident was aware they were a close contact of a case linked to the Chadstone outbreak when they travelled into regional Victoria.

Cafe 'devastated' by positive case in worker
Professor Sutton said the Oddfellows Cafe had done all the right things to reduce the risk of infections, including keeping an excellent register of customer names.

"All of those close contacts are being contacted, but there are 150 of them," he said.

"So again, the infectiousness of this virus and the opportunity to have dozens and dozens of people potentially exposed speaks to the challenge."

On the cafe's Facebook page, owner Kim Short said she was "devastated" after the cafe received the "dreaded call" on Monday informing them a staff member had tested positive.

Cafe owner 'devastated' after employee catches virus from diner
A cafe worker in a regional Victorian town has tested positive for coronavirus after an infected customer visited for breakfast.

Oddfellows Cafe, in Kilmore, 60km north of Melbourne, confirmed the diagnosis on Facebook, with the owner saying they were "devastated" and "angry" in a series of social media posts.

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Oddfellows Cafe in Kilmore, Victoria, has a staff member with coronavirus after an infected diner visited

Earlier this week, the cafe said it had been told staff and customers were at low risk, after being informed by the Victorian government a person who had visited for breakfast last week was later diagnosed with COVID-19.

Then, in last night's post the owners confirmed an employee had now caught the virus.

The Victorian Government this week listed the cafe as a "high risk" location, saying the infected person visited on September 30 between 7am and 10am.

Owner Kim Short posted on Facebook: "I am devastated to announce that late this afternoon we had the dreaded call from DHHS to say that one of our staff members who was in contact with the customer on Wednesday has tested positive to COVID-19.

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Oddfellows Cafe in Kilmore, Victoria, has been forced to close for two weeks after the case.

"All our contact tracing has been given to the DHHS & anyone who is considered a close contact will be contacted & those who have already been contacted will most likely be recontacted.

"If you dined in with us from Wednesday to Saturday last week & for some reason you are not contacted by tomorrow morning please let me know.

"Please stay safe everyone, we are a small community that this could spread very quickly in. If unsure stay home, get tested, l can't stress it enough."

The cafe will be closed for two weeks, with other staff self isolating, she said.

https://twitter.com/VicGovDHHS/status/1 ... wsrc%5Etfw
Another Facebook post said the cafe would be asking "customers they didn't recognise for ID" after the person, who they said they believed was visiting family in the town from Melbourne went in.

Unless they had permission, such as for caring for somebody, that would be breaking Melbourne's 5km travel ban.

"I'm angry but trying not to be as l'm sure they are feeling bad enough. I just know it has shaken us up & hopefully others," the post said.

It is thought the case is linked to the growing Chadstone shopping centre cluster.

Yesterday there was one coronavirus case in regional Victoria, as more students in Melbourne were told they can soon return to school.

But while the person in Shepperton tested positive, health officials said said it could be a false diagnosis and more tests were being done.

Today Victoria recorded a slight increase in cases, with 15 new infections recorded.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp

Kilmore cafe owner blasts COVID-infected Melburnian who dined at venue
It's understood the infected diner had an exemption to leave Melbourne to care for a family member in Kilmore but breached COVID-19 restrictions by dining in at the cafe.

News of an infected visitor sparked a frustrated response from cafe owner Kim Short.

We've worked so hard to keep our business open & following all the guidelines through the whole pandemic, to say l'm upset this has happened when it shouldn't of is an understatement,' Ms Short posted on the cafe's Facebook page.

'It is what it is now and we will deal with it as safe & professionally as possible.'

The infected diner later tested positive after coming into contact with a positive case linked to the growing Chadstone cluster in Melbourne.

Ms Short announced that cafe diners who look unfamiliar will be asked to show ID going forward.

'I'm angry but trying not to be as l'm sure they are feeling bad enough. I just know it has shaken us up & hopefully others. Let's stay safe & not become complacent. We're fighting a monster here!' Ms Short later posted.

The cafe has since been dealt another devastating blow after an employee tested positive on Monday, a day after Ms Short assured staff and customers were classed as 'very low risk.'

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https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp

"All our contact tracing has been given to the DHHS and anyone who is considered a close contact will be contacted and those who have already been contacted will most likely be recontacted," she wrote late last night.

"If you dined in with us from Wednesday to Saturday last week and for some reason you are not contacted by [Tuesday] morning please let me know."

Ms Short told the ABC the infected worker had been isolating at home since Saturday and had a sore throat and headaches.

"She's concerned for everyone, as we all are," Ms Short said.

Ms Short has closed the cafe for a fortnight and Melanie Smith, who runs a myotherapy business upstairs, said she had done the same.

"It's pretty disappointing," she said, adding that she expected the Melbourne resident would "make some different decisions" if they had their time again.

Testing ramped up in Kilmore and Benalla
Premier Daniel Andrews said asymptomatic testing was being offered in Kilmore, and more pop-up testing was planned after a drive-through testing clinic was booked out on Tuesday.

He urged anyone in the town who may have had contact with cases to get tested.

"Better safe than sorry," Mr Andrews said.

"It's asymptomatic testing for a reason and you can go and get tested — and the results will be literally like gold for us."

After dining in Kilmore on the morning of September 30, the Melbourne traveller then visited White Line Tyres in Benalla, in the state's north-east, between 12:00pm and 3:00pm.

Mr Andrews said people were being tested in Benalla but he was not aware of any positive tests being returned there yet.

Latest outbreak highlights 'gargantuan task' of contact tracing
Professor Sutton said the Chadstone outbreak illustrated "just how significantly [coronavirus] can spread far and wide".

"I don't think anyone really understands what a gargantuan task the contact tracing has been through this wave," he said.

"The average family size in Australia is about 2.5 people. We've made estimates that the average family size for the 20,000 cases in this second wave has been between six and 10 people."

Contact tracing during the second wave was also challenging, Professor Sutton said, because many cases had "difficult" social and economic circumstances.

"It's not twice as hard as the first wave, it is 10 times as hard as the first wave in terms of the challenges of following up these cases," he said.

But Professor Sutton said the recent outbreaks "may well be the very last outbreaks that Victoria sees" and the state had so far been able to get on top of them.

The case trigger points for Melbourne to move to the next step in its restrictions roadmap are a statewide 14-day average below five, and fewer than five mystery cases recorded over a two-week period.

Professor Sutton said it was still possible the state could hit that target by October 19.

"Even though this has gotten to a point where it spread very widely, the recent Frankston outbreak now has control in terms of new cases not emerging," he said.

"And the Hallam outbreak the same. Complex, large, across multiple sites, but ultimately, completely controllable.

"So as these numbers drive down further and further, and they're going down in aged care in terms of the staff who work there as well, then you're not getting that new seeding, you're not having to deal with another outbreak.

"We'll absolutely get to five [as a 14-day rolling new case average], and it may still well be mid-October."
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There are still 13 cases with an unknown source included in the latest two-week period.

Eight of Tuesday's 15 new cases are linked to known outbreaks and seven are still under investigation.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... id=msedgdh

Victoria works to contain butcher's shop and regional coronavirus outbreaks
Health officials are working to contain a coronavirus outbreak linked to a butcher’s shop in the Melbourne suburb of Chadstone while battling a new outbreak in regional Victoria.

The Butcher Club in Chadstone is now the source of 28 cases of Covid-19 in Victoria, including eight staff, 11 household and family members, and four customers.

On Tuesday Victoria reported 15 new cases and one death. The state’s chief health officer, Prof Brett Sutton, said although the numbers were higher than he would like, the cases were predominantly related to known outbreaks.

Packed funeral for ultra-Orthdox rabbi inflames Covid tensions in Israel
Australia's most populous state is set to SHRINK
The Guardian logoVictoria works to contain butcher's shop and regional coronavirus outbreaks

Health officials are working to contain a coronavirus outbreak linked to a butcher’s shop in the Melbourne suburb of Chadstone while battling a new outbreak in regional Victoria.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: James Ross/AAP© Provided by The Guardian Photograph: James Ross/AAP
The Butcher Club in Chadstone is now the source of 28 cases of Covid-19 in Victoria, including eight staff, 11 household and family members, and four customers.

On Tuesday Victoria reported 15 new cases and one death. The state’s chief health officer, Prof Brett Sutton, said although the numbers were higher than he would like, the cases were predominantly related to known outbreaks.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Victoria’s chief health officer, Prof Brett Sutton, on Tuesday as he told the media the Chadstone outbreak illustrated how the virus ‘can spread far and wide’.© Photograph: James Ross/AAP Victoria’s chief health officer, Prof Brett Sutton, on Tuesday as he told the media the Chadstone outbreak illustrated how the virus ‘can spread far and wide’.
“We have to get on top of the outbreaks to really drive these numbers down,” he said. “The Chadstone outbreak is an illustration, again, of just how significantly this can spread far and wide.”

Sutton said one case was a close contact of a staff member from the butcher’s shop who had travelled to the regional town of Kilmore and dined in the Oddfellows cafe.

Two more people have since tested positive in Kilmore, including an Oddfellows cafe worker, but the cluster is being treated as separate from the Chadstone outbreak.

Additional testing is being done in Kilmore and Sutton said the cafe was “an illustration of a cafe that did all of the right things” in terms of keeping records of customers.

“[It] has a fantastic register of names,” he said. “All of those close contacts are being contacted, but there are 150 of them.”

People who visited the cafe between 30 September and 3 October are being advised to be tested even if they do not have symptoms.

The 14-day rolling average cases for metropolitan Melbourne is 10.6 and the number of mystery cases between 20 September and 3 October is 13.

The slight rise in case numbers has led to concern Melbourne may not reach the 19 October target of a 14-day rolling average of five cases a day statewide. That is the threshold to move to the next stage of easing restrictions.

“Every outbreak had its complexities and we do get on top of them,” Sutton said. “These may well be the very last outbreaks that Victoria sees. I hope that that is the case and we can get on top of them.”

The Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, said the case showed the second wave wasn’t over yet.

“We’re very, very close,” he said. “We’re very close. But I can’t, in any sense of certainty, I can’t tell people where we’re going to be on the 17th, 18th, 19th of October, let alone the 23rd. That’s why we’ve all got to make the right choices.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp

Victorian Government unsure when Melbourne's 5km coronavirus travel rule will be lifted
Victoria's Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton says authorities are yet to decide what travel will be allowed once Melbourne moves to the third step in its roadmap out of coronavirus restrictions.

"I don't know, I honestly don't know," Professor Sutton said, when asked if the 5-kilometre rule could still be in place after October 19, when restrictions were forecast to next ease.

He said the State Government would consider the level of transmission and how the travel restriction was working before making a decision.

When asked if the 5km travel restriction could simply be physically extended out to allow residents to travel a little further, Professor Sutton said that was also possible.

"I wouldn't rule out anything," he said.

"I don't think we are going at all in a direction that would make it tougher, but going out to 10km is a consideration amongst all options."

It's a significant departure from the State Government's roadmap out of restrictions for the city.

The roadmap which was published on September 13, lists travel across the state as an allowed activity under the third step.

If travel restrictions were to remain during step three of the roadmap, it would be the first time the State Government had delayed easing a restriction from its original plan.

Sutton says 5km rule has helped curb transmission
Professor Sutton said the 5km rule had limited socialising and potential transmission of the virus.

"The issue is that we have now got just a dozen local government areas really where cases are active," he said.

He said movement across the city could reintroduce the virus into areas where there had not been transmission for some time.

"We are incrementally shrinking it down where we are not seeing that postcode-to-postcode movement of the virus," he said.


Professor Sutton said it was difficult to say exactly how big an impact the 5km travel restriction had on cutting down coronavirus case numbers.

"It is really hard to tease apart the individual interventions that are part of a really substantial package that has transformed the transmission through this wave," he said.

"To go from 725 cases to single figures has been a success but to take out each and every element and understand what its contribution has been, is a tricky process."

Professor Sutton said the 5km rule was "in the mix" with what other countries had done to limit transmission of the virus.

Concern Melburnians won't follow the rules if travel restriction eased
He said the Victorian Government had to also consider what lifting the 5km rule would mean for compliance.

"Whether it would be open slather, in that people go to households across metro Melbourne, in that space where masks are not worn, where people have close interaction where they are talking and laughing and those are transmission settings."

But he said authorities were considering the needs of those in Melbourne, who owned regional properties and needed to make bushfire preparations.

"There will have to be bushfire prep in advance of the season, that is being worked on at the moment and the communications and allowances for that are being worked through," he said.

Victoria's Opposition Leader Michael O'Brien is highly critical of the 5km travel rule, saying it should be overturned.

"It seems to be one of those rules that has been put in place by the Premier that has not been supported by a lot of public health experts," he said.

Health expert says government is not making decisions 'based on data'
Deakin University's Chair in Epidemiology Catherine Bennett said she "doesn't get" why the State Government would consider extending the 5km travel rule.

"I am struggling to see the health argument now," she said of the restriction.

She said "it was something else" and not epidemiology that appeared to be determining the State Government's decision-making on travel restrictions for Melburnians.

"The Premier often says movement equals virus, and if that is the position you keep coming back to, then anything that restricts movement is seen to be valuable and valid," she said.

"That is not actually how epidemiology works.

"The more we know about how the virus moves through a community, the more you understand what the response can be, particularly when the numbers are this low."

She said recent workplace transmission showed why the 5km restriction was now of limited value.

Professor Bennett said Melbourne was in a really positive position and she couldn't understand why health authorities were now discussing extending restrictions.

"Melbourne, apart from those three cases known to be linked to those complex cases and outbreaks, five cases today," she said.

"That is one in a million people, we have to get this in proportion."

Professor Bennett said the original plan to allow intrastate travel at the next step of the roadmap was a safe plan.

"I think the original roadmap was overly safe, it was very conservative," she said.

She said extending the 5km travel restriction risked losing some public support for COVID health measures.

"I think it would be losing a mountain of goodwill," she said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... id=msedgdh

Melburnians must prepare for 'whatever comes'
Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton says he cannot confirm whether Melbourne will take the next step out of lockdown scheduled for October 19.

Asked whether Melburnians should be prepared to stay in lockdown beyond mid-October, Mr Sutton said he “never knows what tomorrow will bring”.

“We all have to be prepared for whatever may come," he said.

“I watch these numbers as closely as anyone in the state. And we all want to get to a point where we're satisfied that we know we'll go to the next step, but absolutely no-one wants us to fail in this space.
“So we just have to bear that in mind, and we have to take that next step at an appropriate time when it is safe and when it's steady."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Oct 06, 2020 8:32 am

6 OCT NSW

NSW records 11th day of zero locally acquired coronavirus cases
NSW has recorded zero locally acquired COVID-19 cases for the 11th day in a row.

Health authorities said in the last 24 hours there were 11 cases ALL among returned travellers in hotel quarantine.

There were 5,385 people tested in the reporting period which is a slight increase from yesterday's 4,789.

NSW is treating 50 patients with COVID-19 and three are in intensive care.

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OUTDOOR DINING NOW ALLOWED IN NSW
Venues given green light to expand outside for outdoor dining
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Pubs, cafes and restaurants across Sydney have been given the go-ahead to expand their outdoor seating areas in a bid to give the hospitality industry a boost following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Amended liquor licensing rules in New South Wales will allow venues to operate in a COVID-safe environment while sustaining their revenue by moving patrons outside.

NSW government fast-tracks liquor law changes
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The New South Wales government has fast-tracked liquor law changes in a bid to revive the hospitality industry as the economy recovers from the pandemic.

The changes will allow venues to expand license boundaries in three days instead of taking up to 51 days.

Businesses will also be allowed to apply for al fresco licenses without needing to obtain planning approval.

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The new regulations are part of what has been dubbed the 'al fresco revolution' and mean the state government can turn around applications to change licence boundaries in less than a week rather than the standard process - which can take three months.

The strategy has already been adopted by 16 venues in The Rocks - a historic entertainment district overlooking the Sydney Opera House - as part of a 12-month-trial to rejuvenate the city.

Well-known businesses in The Rocks to have signed up to the plan include The Glenmore, The Fortune of War, The Australian and the Orient.

Licensed venues in that area can take advantage of the new policy from October 16, before authorities extend it to the rest of Sydney on November 1.

Minister for Planning and Public Spaces Rob Stokes said cafés, bars, restaurants and hotels will be able to apply for an outdoor dining licence without needing to get planning approval, making the process easier for business owners.

The move follows Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello announcing last month a taskforce to help the NSW government maximise outdoor hospitality spaces.

'We have cut through red tape to make this happen in a very short time-frame,' Mr Dominello said.

'We're working with City of Sydney and Place Management NSW, the landowner for The Rocks, to condense what was previously a three-month process involving multiple agencies, into a single application that takes a week.'

Mr Stokes said the plan would help lift Sydney out of the pandemic.

'The pandemic has had a devastating effect on the hospitality industry so this solution will not only keep our communities safer, but draw people back into the city so we can support local business and boost the economy,' he said.

Minister for Local Government Shelley Hancock said councils across New South Wales are being urged to look at how they too can fast-track outdoor dining area approvals.

Earlier this month, the NSW government announced a $20million plan to revitalise its coronavirus-battered economy.
As well as outdoor dining areas, pop-up entertainment stages and better opening hours for cultural attractions are among the initiatives hoped to revitalise the Sydney CBD.

'The pandemic forced the CBD into a COVID hibernation and it's vital we revive our use of the city for work and pleasure, to keep people in jobs and businesses in business,' NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet said in a statement.

'This summer will be a testing time for many businesses but this funding will help breath life back into the city and get our economy moving again.'

The state government has committed $15 million, and the City of Sydney another $5 million, to help businesses in the city get back on their feet.

Sydney's outdoor dining revolution set to entice customers back
Already 16 pubs, restaurants and cafes have taken advantage of the so-called al fresco revolution, aimed at making it easier for venues to operate after months of losses brought on by the global pandemic.

The 12-month trial will see venues move tables and chairs outside, just in time for patrons to enjoy the warmer weather in a COVID-safe environment.

It's set to be a welcome relief for businesses in the lead up to the busy Christmas and New Year period.

Some of the venues in The Rocks to sign up for the streetscape transformation include The Glenmore, The Fortune of War, The Australian, the Orient, and the Mercantile.

The Bakers Oven Cafe, The Rocks Cafe, and Appetito are also taking part.

Under the changes, venues can expand their licence boundaries in three days, down from 51 days.

Planning and Public Spaces Minister Rob Stokes said businesses would also be able to apply for al fresco licences without the specific need to get planning approval.

The Rocks has been hit particularly hard by coronavirus shutdowns, due to a fall in overseas visitors.

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BEACH OVERCROWDING CRACKDOWN
Sydney beaches to issue Covid capacity warnings (by SMS, radio , emails) , as warm weather delivers large crowds
Beachgoers in Sydney were told to avoid a handful of popular beaches that neared their coronavirus capacity on Monday as beaches south of the city in the Royal National Park were shut due to large crowds.

A combination of warm weather exceeding 30C, and the final day of the labor day long weekend, saw councils in Sydney’s eastern and northern suburbs issue warnings in the middle of the day urging people preparing for an afternoon swim to rethink their plans.

Capacity warnings were issued for Bondi beach and North Cronulla beach while Randwick council – which takes in Clovelly, Coogee and Maroubra beaches – also told beachgoers to make alternate plans. None of the beaches were actually forced to close to new visitors, however.

Wattamolla and Garie beaches within the Royal National Park were shut when they reached capacity before midday with roads reopening shortly after 5pm.

Earlier on Monday, New South Wales recorded its tenth consecutive day of zero community transmission of Covid-19.

In what was the first major test for its summer crowd management plan, Waverley council released a statement about 1.30pm noting Bondi beach was “nearing capacity” of about 6,000 visitors.

“If people continue to come to Bondi beach and crowds grow further, restricted access to the sand is likely to be implemented within the next hour 2-3pm,” a spokeswoman said.

“If you haven’t left for the beach yet, please rethink your trip and check on capacity later in the day.”

A spokeswoman told Guardian Australia the warning kept enough beachgoers away and the council was not forced to cut off access to new visitors. The warning was the first issued since the council’s Covid-19 summer plan was announced early last week.

When Bondi beach’s capacity of about 6,000 is reached, no one on the sand will be asked to leave, but people seeking to enter will be told to visit local shops and cafes until enough people leave and “beach ambassadors” consider it safe to reopen.

The mayor, Paula Masselos, said on Monday that the “long weekend has really been a tester for this summer”.

“We did nearly reach capacity at Bondi beach today, but thankfully people got our message of coming back another time,” she said. “At no point did we need to restrict access to the sand.”

Further south, lifeguards worked with police to manage crowd numbers at North Cronulla beach to ensure social distancing was respected.

“Those intending to visit beaches within the Sutherland Shire are encouraged to explore other areas of the Bate Bay coastline that are currently less crowded, or delay their visit until crowd numbers subside,” the council said in the early afternoon.

Related: Bondi beach closed after crowds defy ban on gatherings of 500-plus

A spokesman for Sutherland Shire Council later told Guardian Australia that despite the police presence, the warning meant enough people avoided the beach so capacity was not reached, and access was not shut off to new visitors.

Large crowds were also reported on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, with a council spokesman telling Guardian Australia that all beaches, despite nearing capacity, remained open to new visitors.

NSW government rules stipulate people on the sand are required to keep a 1.5 metre distance between themselves and anyone from a different household. Restrictions limiting outdoor gathering to 20 apply on beaches.

Warmer weather in autumn was a pressure test of the public’s ability to adhere to Covid-19 restrictions early in the pandemic.

The risk of coronavirus spreading in mucus in water, new life-saving protocols that ban mouth to mouth resuscitation and crowd control measures are all set to alter the beachgoing experience this summer.

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NSW beach crowds pose biggest COVID-19 test for local and state governments this summer
It's not unusual to see Sydney's beaches packed with sun-tanned bodies cooling off as temperatures heat up.

But the crowds that flocked to the coast over the weekend will likely leave authorities hot under the collar.

In a year that's been like no other, COVID-19 has changed almost everything — including how we take part in the most Australian of summer rituals.

Who would have thought last season that Sydney's most famous stretch of sand, Bondi, would be patrolled by "beach ambassadors" to ensure social distancing?

In a sign of the times, the NSW Government last month launched its COVID-safe summer plan, encouraging beachgoers to keep a towel-length between themselves and anyone not from the same household.

But if photographs and aerial vision are anything to go by, it seems that message didn't get through to the thousands who flocked to beaches across Greater Sydney this weekend.

In the eastern suburbs, Bondi beach came close to capacity, but Waverley Mayor Paula Masselos insisted "most people" managed to follow Public Health Orders.

She said the long weekend had been a "tester" for this summer as beachgoers adjusted to "our new normal".

Coogee was also packed, causing Randwick Council to warn people to stay away.

Cronulla in the Sutherland Shire was also close to full, with police called in to help lifeguards and council officers to enforce social distancing.

Wattamolla and Garie Beach in the Royal National Park were closed after their car parks hit capacity, and drivers were turned away.

It follows the closure of Sydney beaches — including Bondi that made global headlines — earlier this year over concerns of overcrowding and social distancing.

Authorities have already said they will work hard to manage numbers if overcrowding becomes an issue again this summer.

And there's no doubt it will.

While councils managed well to keep people away once beaches neared capacity, they'll have their work cut out as summer approaches.

The next steps will be to limit access to beaches, or close them completely, and for police to issue infringement notices to those not following the rules.

But the biggest challenge to come for the NSW Government is convincing the public to remain vigilant against the virus when we're doing so well.

For the past 10 days the state has recorded no community transmission.

Despite this, Premier Gladys Berejiklian and her chief health officer Kerry Chant have been at pains to remind the public COVID-19 is likely still "lurking" within the community.

But it will be an increasingly tough sell when the sun's shining and Christmas holidays near.

Just look at what happened in Wuhan, coronavirus ground zero, where thousands of people gathered at a beach water park for an electronic music festival in August.

Or in the US state of Minnesota, where social distancing warnings were ignored as .

It's the same the world over. After months of Government-imposed restrictions, people understandably want to let their hair down and have some fun.

But before we get too excited, perhaps the NSW public can look to the devastating effects of the European summer, where beachgoers ignored warnings and some countries found themselves in the midst of a second wave.

While infections there were also driven by an opening of borders, authorities here will be hoping NSW doesn't wipe-out in such a spectacular fashion.

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SNOBS WANT TO MONOPOLISE BEACHES IN THEIR SUBURBS ( DESPITE THESE BEING PUBLIC BEACHES RUN BY LOCAL COUNCILS & THE SURF LIFE SAVING CLUB).
Locals in affluent suburbs want to keep people OUT of their beaches
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Locals in Sydney's most affluent beachside suburbs have suggested building walls to keep people out to help stem overcrowding during the summer months.

Thousands of beachgoers flocked to Sydney's eastern and northern beaches across the long weekend, prompting calls from health officials to remember COVID-19 protocols.

New South Wales on Tuesday recorded its 11th day without any community transmission of the deadly respiratory virus, but there are concerns large crowds gathered at beaches could be the ideal breeding ground.

In one community Facebook group discussing the crowds at Balmoral Beach, one resident suggested they 'build a wall' to keep the amount of beachgoers down.

'We need to build a wall! No one past Neutral Bay,' one user posted in the Mosman Living group on Tuesday.

Others suggested installing video cameras on days that are expected to be busy to ensure people are doing the right thing. 'Video cameras on busy days. High fines. Ranger control. People must be informed,' they said.

Mosman councillor Simon Menzies has vowed to try to implement a beach management plan for the summer, particularly after beachgoers on the long weekend left rubbish behind.

'Managing waste on collection days like today is never easy. Even more bins may reduce the problem but the real challenge is getting more visitors to actually use them, rather than littering,' he said.

'At a council meeting to be held tomorrow night (Tuesday) we are discussing a summer beach management plan during the pandemic.

'I will raise the issue of waste management in the hope that some fine tuning of the system can take place to minimise the negative impacts caused by high visitor numbers.'

North Cronulla beach was shut off to new visitors on Monday afternoon because the capacity under current COVID-19 restrictions had been reached.

Similar threats were made at Bondi and Coogee beaches in Sydney's east, were tens of thousands of people lined the sand as the mercury soared to 31C.

Lifesavers at Coogee warned beachgoers of the need to keep 1.5 metres between them and others, both in the water and on the sand.

The massive crowds led to NSW Police patrolling the beaches in the early afternoon.

'If people continue to come to Bondi Beach and crowds grow further, restricted access to the sand is likely to be implemented within the next hour 2-3pm,' Waverley Council said in a statement.

'If you haven't left for the beach yet, please rethink your trip and check on capacity later in the day.'

andwick City Council, which controls Coogee and Maroubra Beaches, advised keen swimmers to make other plans.

'Many of our beaches are approaching capacity, so please make alternate plans if you're heading to our coastline,' the council tweeted on Monday.

'If you're already in the area, enjoy the warm weather at our beachside parks and reserves, or support local businesses by visiting stores in our town centres.'

Despite concerns, NSW reported its 11th day with no new community transmission of COVID-19, bolstering hopes of holidays to Queensland this summer.

The welcome figures come despite fears that thousands flocking to the beach over the long weekend could be a source of coronavirus transmission.

The state recorded 11 new cases of the deadly respiratory infection on Tuesday, but all new cases were found in returned travellers completing their mandatory hotel quarantine.

NSW Health conducted 5,385 tests in the 24-hour reporting period to Tuesday.

There are just 50 active cases in NSW, including three in intensive care, and none of the patients require ventilation.

Authorities are calling on people from the Hawkesbury region and south west Sydney to seek testing after fragments of the virus were detected in the region's sewage system.

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SHARK WARNINGS ISSUED AGAIN
Urgent shark warning for a string of popular beaches in NSW
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An urgent warning was issued to beach goers after a whale carcass that washed up on shore led to increased shark activity over the public holiday weekend.

The whale carcass washed up on Casuarina Beach in northern New South Wales on Monday afternoon, prompting a warning to stay out of the water.

The sharks came closer to shore to feed on the dead whale's body, forcing beaches to close.
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The closed beaches include Salt, Casuarina, Cabarita, Hastings, North Pottsville and South Pottsville.

Chris Smyth from Surf Lifesaving NSW said lifeguards are on roving patrols on jet skis but are no longer able to find the whale carcass.

Lifeguards believe it has washed back out to sea.

'They are putting up signs on the beach and doing a lot of work to inform the public of what has happened,' Mr Smyth said.

'People are welcome to come to the beaches - but they must not go into the water.'

A spokesman from Tweed Shire Council told Daily Mail Australia the carcass had floated back out to sea.

'Council is continuing to monitor the situation, and working alongside the Department of Primary Industries,' the spokesman said.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Department of Primary Industries for comment.

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SOON THE TAILOR, BLUE NOSE SALMON, TREVALLY AND SHARKS WILL BE GATHERING ALONG BEACHES ATTRACTED BY HERRING , WHITEBAIT, AND SQUID SCHOOLS , MORE SHARKS .

NOT PROPERLY SUPERVISED IN HOSPITAL
Dementia patient found with horrific injuries ( suffered in fall ( from bed ? over bedside roll off restrains ? ) )
An 83-year-old dementia patient has suffered major bruising to her face, neck and arms following her stay at Hornsby Hospital.

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JOB AND SERVICE DESERT IN WESTERN SYDNEY
Penrith residents desperate for new local jobs
20 years ago Western Sydney was promised thousands of new jobs with a plan to convert unused land into an employment hub / industrial estate . Never happened.

COUNCILS CORRUPTLY ALLOWED REZONING TO RESIDENTIAL UNDER PRESSURE FROM MONEY HUNGRY SPECULATOR-DEVELOPERS
Western Sydney residents slam plan to rezone employment area for homes they don't want
Local residents in Penrith are making a last-ditch bid to prevent a site earmarked to create hundreds of jobs in Western Sydney from being rezoned for a major housing development.

The 38-hectare parcel of land on the former Australian Defence Industries (ADI) site at Jordan Springs, near Penrith, was intended to be an employment hub for locals.

But Lendlease wants to scrap that plan, calling on the NSW Government to rezone it for 500 homes instead.

A decision on the project proposal is being "fast-tracked" as part of a NSW Government initiative to boost the economy and construction projects during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The rezoning proposal has been sitting with the Planning Department for two years but now a decision will be made on Friday.

Local residents have slammed the proposal and say it's trading potentially thousands of ongoing jobs for 252 construction jobs.

Local resident and former convenor of the ADI Residents Action Group, Geoff Brown said rezoning would scrap vital long-term employment opportunities.

"How is that a net benefit for NSW? A long-held promise to 38.4 hectares of employment land and thousands of ongoing local jobs, scrapped for 500 homes and just 252 temporary construction jobs. It doesn't add up."

Mr Brown said the original plan promised "sustainable world-class development," but rezoning would mean more people would have to travel outside the area for work.

"The local people want the jobs, not the houses," he said.

Lendlease said it continued to support jobs for the area.

"Lendlease's continued development of the ADI site will significantly contribute to further employment opportunities for the community into the future," the company said.

Lacking infrastructure
Penrith Council has strongly voiced its opposition and made submissions urging against the approval.

Mayor Karen McKeown said jobs were a greater priority than housing and the infrastructure did not exist to support a growth in population.

"You can't have everyone travelling out of the area to jobs day-in, day-out," she said.

"We haven't got the transport infrastructure to support it and we certainly don't have things like the necessary schools and health facilities that come with higher densities.

"We are against more housing here — we are advocating for jobs."

Ms McKeown said her message to NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes was simple.

"Please do not rezone this for housing, this needs to be employment lands. It was promised to the residents — please stick to the plan."

Developer 'broke their promise'
Another local resident Ken Rollison lives in the nearby suburb of Werrington Downs and travels an hour each way for his job as an electrician.

He said working locally would improve his quality of life, reduce his cardon footprint and would give him more time to spend with his family.

But he said he was "totally disappointed" with the rezoning and hoped the State Government would not approve the plan.

"To me, a development plan is like a promise. Lendlease has put this development plan forward which we approved, and now they want to change it, so Lendlease have broken their promise," he said.

Lendlease senior development manager Kevin Montier said the company remained committed to supporting jobs and upskilling for the Penrith and Blacktown communities.

"This parcel of land lends itself as a natural extension of the adjacent existing residential area, in a location that has little demand for employment land, owing to its distance from main roads and freeways," he said.

"A sufficient supply of employment land across the Penrith LGA further strengthens the case for rezoning."

Lendlease said it set up the St Marys Skilling and Employment Centre in 2005, which had created 6,000 jobs to date.

A spokesperson for the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment said it was finalising its response to Lendlease's request.

"The Department will address all community and council feedback as part of the assessment process."

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6 OCT QLD

Queensland again records no new coronavirus cases but Health Minister warns testing numbers down
Queensland recorded another day without new cases of coronavirus, but the state's tally of active cases has jumped from six to seven.

A returning traveller tested positive to the virus while in Indonesia and came back to Australia with the disease.

Health Minister Steven Miles said that because the traveller contracted the disease in Indonesia and was diagnosed there, the person had been added to Indonesia's tally.

The traveller was taken to the Redcliffe Hospital upon arrival in Queensland and has been placed in isolation.

"They were slated to return as part of the returning traveller program, the Chief Health Officer was aware that they were positive and they were transferred to Redcliffe Hospital and they are being cared for there," Mr Miles said.

It has been more than 25 days since Queensland recorded a COVID-19 case that posed a risk of community transmission.

But Mr Miles expressed concern about Queensland's low rate of testing over the past 24 hours.

"We tested 2,506 people, about half the number that we would like to test," he said.

"It is incredibly important that people continue to get tested."

Mr Miles said the testing of wastewater in sewage treatment plants around Queensland would continue to be used as an indicator of where the virus could still be active.

"That's where we'll focus our effort — on increasing testing rates and opening fever clinics additional hours.

"We're doing localised messaging around that in Cannonvale, North Rockhampton and Cairns and Ipswich."

Speaking as the Queensland election campaign got underway, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk described another day with no new cases as "wonderful news".

"I love those days and I know Queenslanders love those days as well," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"That's exactly what we want — to continue on that path to recovery."

"We're in a unique time in our lives, never before have we been in the midst of a global pandemic and my job is to look after Queenslanders and their families."

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LATERAL THINKERS
Queensland wedding planner became a COVID-safe officer to rescue her business during the coronavirus pandemic
When the Queensland Government implemented restrictions for weddings earlier this year, wedding planner Kimberley Hourigan knew she had to adapt her business to stay afloat.

She added "COVID-safe officer" to her list of services after noticing couples wanted to have weddings in private venues that lacked COVID-safe plans.

In Queensland, private gatherings are currently limited to 30 people, but up to 100 people can attend if the couple engages a business or an operator who has been accredited by Queensland Health.

For $250, couples can hire Ms Hourigan's team to attend their wedding and make sure everyone, from the guests to catering companies, is complying with the rules.

Before the event, her team measures the distance between every table and chair to ensure they comply with the 1.5 metre social-distancing rule.

Hand-sanitising stations are set up and signs are supplied to advise guests of the rules.

"Our main role is ensuring that all the requirements are followed," Ms Hourigan said.

"We sign guests in when they arrive, take their temperature, and make sure no-one has any cold or flu symptoms."

Guests are monitored during the event to make sure they're staying safe.

"We just kind of hang out in the corner and observe and make sure everyone follows the rules," she said.

Ms Hourigan said there was a lot of pressure on operators to ensure every aspect of a wedding complied with health directives, because they could be fined for any breaches.

"Because we are running the COVID-safe plan, we are the ones that cop it," she said.

Some wedding planners had declined to offer the service because of the financial risk, Ms Hourigan said.

Others are charging couples more than $1,000 to be COVID-safe.

"Brides can't afford that," she said.

The entrepreneurial move has flooded Ms Hourigan's business with customers.

"When the restrictions first came out and we announced we were going to do a COVID-safe plan wedding package, we had hundreds and hundreds of messages from brides and grooms," she said.

Ms Hourigan said the pandemic had changed her customers' views about having a big wedding and many saw her package as an alternative to postponing.

While the pandemic decimated other businesses in the wedding industry, Ms Hourigan said it helped hers to grow.

"COVID has actually helped my business," she said.

"It's been very busy; we've actually had to turn people away."

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SEA CHANGE MOVEMENT SPURRED BY INTERSTATE COVID-REFUGEES
Sunshine Coast schools see increased interstate enrolments
Some families are fleeing states with much stricter restrictions due to the pandemic

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6 OCT WA

WA Chief Health Officer Andy Robertson flags return to stronger restrictions if hard border removed
Western Australia's Chief Health Officer says any move to relax the state's hard border would likely see a return to stronger restrictions on movement within the state.

Under the current health advice the border restrictions will remain in place until there have been 28 consecutive days without community transmission of coronavirus anywhere in Australia.

The State Government has attracted internal and external criticism for its stance, with one epidemiologist describing the 28 day rule as "beyond caution".

Chief Health Officer Andy Robertson told ABC Radio Perth the thinking behind that stance centres on a number of issues, including not wanting to rely on other states' ability to control the spread of COVID-19.

"If we open up to other states we then rely on their borders," he said.

"We need to factor that into our thinking."

He also said the speed at which WA had transitioned to a more open model made relaxing the border a risky proposition.

"Because people can socialise, can go to work, can enjoy themselves … we are actually quite susceptible to a case," he said.

"If we get even one or two cases coming in, we're likely to get a serious outbreak, which may require further restrictions."

No political pressure to change advice: CHO
Dr Robertson said having to re-introduce restrictions would cause serious damage to the state.

"I think we're at a stage now where that would have a serious impact on people's work," he said.

"It would have a serious impact on tourism it would have a serious impact on peoples' ability to get out and about.

"I think the benefits for people in WA would be outweighed by those restrictions."

Dr Robertson also said he did not feel any political pressure to change his health advice.

"I'm asked to provide advice regularly as to where we are at, what's happening, and where I anticipate we should be going, and what is safe to do to enable the WA community to remain safe," he said.

Technology more humane option: AMA
The WA Branch of the Australian Medical Association wants the Government to rely more on technology to help monitor the risk of a coronavirus outbreak in the state.

AMA WA president Andrew Miller said border protocols should transition "from being hard to also being smart".

"If it's smarter, and we're using tech better so people don't need to quarantine more than they absolutely have to, people might have the option of quarantining away from hotels in a safe place we can monitor through tech.

"That is the sort of thing Western Australians and the rest of Australians can cope with.

"We could set out some milestones and say we are going to transition to a more humane quarantining, particularly for families with young children, where in other states they're able to access apartment accommodation or be at home with the Good to Go app," he said.

"I think that could also apply to international travellers."

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6 OCT SA

South Australian medical contingent returns from Melbourne
A regional South Australia nurse who volunteered to work at the epicentre of Australia's coronavirus health crisis conceded she was initially "nervous" about potentially contracting the deadly disease.

Registered nurse Tanya Clarke is now quarantining at Mount Gambier's medi-hotel after returning yesterday from an eight-week stint working with COVID-19 positive patients at a Melbourne hospital.

Ms Clarke joined a small South Australian medical contingent who helped nurse the overflow of COVID-19 patients from Victorian aged care facilities.

"Initially when I went over I was nervous, there was no doubt," Ms Clarke said.

"I had friends that I'd worked with for years saying, 'oh, please don't go over. We do not want you to get sick — we are worried'."

But Ms Clarke said they learned to be "very careful" and follow stringent personal protective gear protocols.

Work brought 'highs and lows'
While there were some "heartbreaking" moments, Ms Clarke said the South Australian group was "warmly" welcomed by their Victorian colleagues, patients, and their families.

"The ward was completely closed, so that meant relatives couldn't get in to see their loved ones," Ms Clarke said.

"We were really at the core of not only providing health support, but a lot of emotional support to the families.

"They would come to the windows and wave. There were sad stories, people died and didn't get to go home."

A registered nurse for 25 years, Ms Clarke weighed up the risk carefully before signing up to work as pandemic nurse.

"Even with all the risks involved, it was an exciting time to extend my practice," she said.

Ms Clarke said she jumped into her car, crossed the Victorian border and drove to the private hospital.

"We basically set up a hospital, from scratch, to deal with a lot of the overflow of COVID-19 patients from the nursing homes, which were in a bit of a bother," she said.

This helped free up beds at major Melbourne hospitals.

"We took a lot of their positive patients initially," Ms Clarke said.

"There have been some really big highs and lows during that time.

"I felt that we had made such a big contribution to what was going on over here."

'Deep insight into a human experience'
Ms Clarke said there were five medical professionals who joined the small contingency.

"One nurse from Western Australia, myself from Mount Gambier, two from Adelaide and one lovely young girl from Port Pirie," she said.

"The experience extended my nursing practice greatly — this is what we trained for. This is our core business.

"Despite all the risks, it is what we do for a living. It is a really deep insight into a human experience.

"You have your terrible days, and you have days where you go, 'Oh, my gosh, I feel grateful to do this job and to be involved with this'."

Ms Clarke, who last night checked into the Mount Gambier medi-hotel for a two week quarantine period, said she had four negative COVID-19 tests before departing Melbourne.

"It is about being really cautious to keep the testing process going now in quarantine," she said.

"The testing process will continue and I'll have swabs when I go in and as well as going out," she said.

Ms Clarke, who was embroiled in a quarantine payment saga with her employer last week, said she was relieved this situation had been resolved.

This followed the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation SA branch stepping in and calling for her employer, Healthe Care, to pay for the two-week quarantine costs.

"We just want other members and other nurses to know that if they look at these contracts, please read the black and white," Ms Clarke said.

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6 OCT NT

The NT Government handed out tourism spending money. Some businesses boomed, but others went bust
Tour operator Mark Coulton had been out of reception for days, deep in a national park north of Katherine, when he drifted back into range and his phone blew up.

It was the middle of March — just a few months after his tourism business Sandrifter Safaris, offering bespoke guidance through the Top End's natural wonders, accepted lucrative contracts with major travel operators.

2020 had begun with the busiest period in his company's near decade-long lifetime and the good times prompted a flurry of spending.

"Being an owner-operator, that came out of my pocket, with the idea of it being paid off by November 2020 — everything being paid off, the vehicles, bus, trailer upgrades, all the new equipment and so on," he said.

"Every day I'd wake up, have a coffee and there'd be 10, 15 bookings for one month, two months, five months, 12 months in advance.

"You'd just click 'Accept' — done."

Then he got the news that coronavirus had arrived and it was about to prompt a mighty reversal of fortunes.

It was a line of tumbling dominoes: international and state borders going up, destinations closing, hundreds of thousands of dollars in bookings falling through.

"By the 20th of March, I was left standing in my kitchen going 'Holy hell, how am I going to pay for this?'," Mr Coulton said.

Cash handouts to explore your backyard
In June, the Northern Territory Government introduced a stimulus program intended to throw tourism operators like Mr Coulton a lifeline.

$5.2 million was tipped into a voucher scheme that offered Northern Territorians $200 of government funding, matched dollar-for-dollar, to explore their backyard.

People booked helicopter trips to remote pubs and hotel staycations.

By late September, the scheme had generated nearly $9 million in total gross sales related to the program, according to a Tourism NT spokesperson.

Tourism bodies in other jurisdictions were watching closely, and the scheme inspired localised spin-offs in Western Australia, Tasmania and South Australia as well as two additional rounds in the NT.

"We've spent numerous marketing campaigns trying to attract the local dollar, and it's a tough gig," said Rachel Beaumont-Smith, a longtime operator who runs nightly cruises around the Darwin Harbour.

When the scheme came online, the local dollar flowed in, Ms Beaumont-Smith's staff were kept on the books and locals were given a low-effort show as radiant sunsets were refracted across the Arafura Sea.

Tourism Top End said the trickle of bookings saved numerous local businesses from shuttering for good.

"Things that were quick and easy to book did very well out of the voucher scheme," Ms Beaumont-Smith said.

Voucher spending 'really sporadic'
But numerous operators have raised concerns the millions in sales have been spread unevenly throughout the sector.

"I think it's absolutely obvious now that it's been really sporadic — we haven't had the same take-up for our tour operators, our four-wheel drive and our bus operators," Ms Beaumont-Smith said.

Mr Coulton — who shared her concerns — claimed the scheme ultimately cost him money.

He said it yielded just one booking, which was outstripped by ongoing expenses like insurance, as well as money tipped into preparation and promotional work.

"People were basically spending a lot of their voucher money on just accommodation and not touring," he said.

Data from the Tourism NT spokesperson shows the majority of spending took place across the Top End, with about 10 per cent of the total sales made in Central Australia and less still in Katherine.

Accommodation, fishing charters and harbour cruises topped the spending list.

Chief Minister Michael Gunner acknowledged the touring sector's traditional markets had dried up and said "some big and hard decisions" would need to be made.

For Mr Coulton, that came earlier this year: he will soon cut ties with his long-time home, sell his business and relocate to the Pilbara in WA.

"I just decided to hang on as long as I could and just shelve the lot," he said.

"Physically, emotionally, mentally it had taken a lot out of me."

Stormy weather ahead
As the industry turns the corner on its low period over the northern summer, the concern facing operators now is how to make up ground lost during a desolate peak season.

"It's also important to note this has gone a small way — a $5 million dollar voucher campaign against a $2.6 billion-per-year industry," Glen Hingley from Tourism Top End said.

"It's been a small, little stopgap and we're grateful the Government is continuing this on in round two or three, for what we think of as our critical infrastructure."

Some hopes are hanging on a plan to rebrand the hot and humid end-of-year period in order to drive up domestic visitation and attract spending from locals who can no longer travel to places like Bali, Singapore and Thailand.

The push is premised on an aspirational future where coronavirus doesn't return and drive everyone back into lockdown — and even if it does not, there is widespread concern that there is stormy weather ahead.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/markets ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Posts: 12567
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Oct 06, 2020 9:16 am

6 OCTOBER FEDERAL

DOMINATED BY FEDERAL BUDGET ANNOUNCEMENTS AND ANALYSIS , AND TRUMP'S "SELF DISCHARGE" FROM THE HOSPITAL.

INFRASTRUCTURE
Budget 2020: $7.5 billion for “key” transport infrastructure projects
The funding, which will be outlaid in Tuesday’s federal budget, will serve as the cornerstone of the Commonwealth’s infrastructure spending to help lift the economy out of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said projects across the country will benefit from the spending, including major road projects in Queensland and New South Wales.

“We have been working closely with state and territory governments to invest in the infrastructure that is ready to go and can help rebuild our economy and create more jobs,” Morrison said in a statement.

The announcement is the latest in a bevy of pre-budget announcements in recent days, as the government prepares to unveil the budget, which will chart its plan lifting Australia out of its first recession in almost 30 years.

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https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/news/bu ... d=msedgdhp

HELPING FEMALES REMAIN OR RETURN TO WORKFORCE - SUPPOSEDLY ( BUY FEMALE INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISTS WERE NOT IMPRESSED TO NIGHT , NOT MUCH SUBSTANCE )
Australia's coronavirus Budget to target women unemployed by pandemic
The Federal Budget will target women who have been left unemployed by the coronavirus pandemic - with 60 per cent of returning jobs heading in their direction.

The government's second women's economic security statement will be released on Tuesday night in Canberra.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said women and young people are among Australians who have been 'heaviest hit by this crisis'.

'Importantly, more than half of those who have lost their jobs have now got back to work. And we saw 54 per cent of the jobs being lost, being jobs lost by women,' he said on Tuesday morning.

'60 per cent of the jobs that have come back are jobs that are going to women.'

Mr Frydenberg said the statement would focus on boosting female workforce participation.

'We want to get it back to that record high that was before this crisis began,' he said.

The treasurer said previous recessions had shown unemployment 'goes up the elevator and comes down the stairs'.

'In the 1980s, it took six years to get unemployment back below six per cent from where it started,' he said.

'In the 1990s, it took 10 years.
'We want to move faster than that and importantly, we want to help women and young people get back to work.'

Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese said it was clear women had been disproportionately affected by the recession.

'We can't have a pink recession and a blue recovery,' he said.

'What we need to do is make sure, in terms of fairness, that those issues are addressed.'

It remains unclear what the budget will do for women, who have represented more than 50 per cent of job losses during the coronavirus pandemic.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

UNI HECS FUNDING TO ENCOURAGE UNDERGRADS AND SCHOOL LEAVERS TO MAJOR IN SCIENCE, ENGINEERING, AGROCULTURAL SCIENCE, NURSING, MEDICINE AND TEACHING
Humanities students will pay up to 113% more for uni courses after Centre Alliance backs changes
Future university students in disciplines such as law and humanities will pay up to 113% more than current students after Centre Alliance threw its support behind the Coalition’s university funding changes, ensuring it will pass the Senate.
On Tuesday the party’s education spokeswoman, Rebekha Sharkie, confirmed its senator Stirling Griff would help the government pass the bill in return for more places for South Australian universities and protections for failing students.

The government will now be able to pass the bill in budget week in time for the 2021 academic year, with the support of One Nation and Centre Alliance, overcoming opposition from Labor, the Greens, and independent senators Jacqui Lambie and Rex Patrick.

South Australian universities welcomed the deal, but Labor and the Greens branded it a sell-out that would harm students.

The bill increases fees for some courses, including humanities and law, to fund fee cuts for other courses, such as sciences, and an overall cut in the government contribution from 58% to 52%.

But Sharkie told Sky News that – unlike its proposed reforms in 2017 – the Coalition had not proposed “blunt cuts” but had gone away and “done its homework” to design a package to improve opportunities for regional universities and students.

Sharkie explained that course fee changes were designed to address a “glut of law students leaving university” while Australia is “importing engineering graduates”.

“The government’s trying to shift the balance there – to focus people on areas we know we have a huge demand for skills,” she said.

“We think the package is very good for regional Australia, for Australia moreover.”

Although Centre Alliance “had a few concerns” with the package, it had “ironed out” differences and will support the bill.

Centre Alliance has won funding for a 3.5% growth in places at South Australia’s three universities, in line with regional universities. By contrast, the package grants 1% growth in bachelor places for low-growth metro universities and 2.5% for high-growth metro universities.

“South Australia needed to be treated differently because we are a very small state,” Sharkie said. “We were seeking to have the support that will be given to regions such as Tasmania … the Northern Territory, regional Queensland and New South Wales.”

Sharkie said Centre Alliance had also secured “extra protections for students”. In response to concerns the bill would cut students off from government funding if they failed more than half their courses in first year, it has negotiated legislative protection of special circumstances that could excuse a high fail rate. These include illness, death, mental illness, divorce or natural disasters such as bushfire.

It has also negotiated funding for four study hubs across regional South Australia to provide extra support to regional students.

“We also advocated for the reinstatement of a 10% discount for upfront Fee-Help student contributions, the confirmation of a professional pathway for psychology and social work, and a formal independent review of these legislative reforms after 18 months,” Sharkie said.

In July Sharkie said she had “serious concerns” about fee rises of up to 113% for humanities students, warning the hikes were “grossly unfair” on students in year 12.

But in September she softened the party’s opposition by noting “parts of the bill … have merit but what’s proposed for South Australia is concerning”.

One Nation has traded its support for greater protection of freedom of speech on university campuses, a 10% discount for students who pay fees upfront and reinstating a seven-year limit on full-time students deferring fees with government loans.

The shadow education minister, Tanya Plibersek, said it was “cruel and inexplicable” that Centre Alliance would join One Nation to support a bill that makes it harder to attend university and cuts $1bn from federal funding for university teaching.

“An ordinary four-year degree will now cost around $58,000 for many disciplines,” she told reporters in Canberra.

Plibersek said year 12 students had faced “the year from hell” during Covid-19 and will now graduate “with an American-sized university debt at a time when the unemployment market is the worst it’s been in decades”.

Related: In this recession, low-paid women and those without a degree are being hit hardest in Australia | Greg Jericho

Lambie opposes the bill because of the impact on poorer students who might be deterred from university by higher fees.

Patrick said changes negotiated by his former party were a “bandaid” and although he doesn’t oppose improvements for a senator’s home state, such deals should not have been pursued because the bill is “harmful across the country”.

One of the peak bodies representing universities, Universities Australia, has called on the crossbench to back the job-ready graduate package to achieve funding certainty.

But there is still strong backlash among research-intensive universities who fear cuts to their teaching and learning budgets.

The university sector are awaiting Tuesday’s budget in the hope it contains new funding for research but are prepared to accept bringing forward funding from 2024 as an emergency stop gap.

After criticisms the package failed to create new places, the education minister, Dan Tehan, bolstered it by promising an extra $326m for up to 12,000 new places in 2021.


https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

TRAVEL
Australian demand for off-road vehicles skyrockets amid pandemic
Demand for off-road vehicles has significantly increased since the outset of the coronavirus pandemic as Australians take advantage of lower fuel prices and explore more of the country.

Moody's Analytics Senior Economist Michael Brisson told Sky News the drop in fuel prices sparked a higher demand for SUVs, utes and pickups.

Carsales.com reported four out of the top five vehicles searched for on the website were for off-roading.

Bookings for camp sites and caravan parks also rebounded strongly following the easing of some coronavirus-induced restrictions.

Caravan Association of Australia CEO Stuart Lamont said “about 90 per cent of all of our trips and 70 per cent of all of our visitors spend is out in regional and rural Australia”.

“So it’s really important that we become mobile again and help those townships out,” he said.

ARB – Australia’s largest manufacturer and supplier of four wheel drive accessories – saw record sales in June and July.

Worldwide COVID shutdowns also reduced the supply of new vehicles to Australia, forcing buyers to turn to the second hand car market.

Sky News revealed the average price of a four wheel drive vehicle increased by 30 per cent in four months.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

THIS IS POPULAR TOO , SOME TOW A FISHING BOAT , OTHERS TOW A CAR TRAILER WITH THE 4X4 ON IT.
This Aussie couple bought a bus for $20,000 and converted it into a home on wheels - take a look inside
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* A couple from Perth converted a 12-metre bus into a house on wheels.
* The bus includes a bedroom, two wardrobes and a full-sized shower.
* The couple told Business Insider Australia how they converted the vehicle.

Perth couple Harry Shaw and Hannah Repton converted a 12-metre (40ft) bus into a house on wheels.

"It was something that both of us had always wanted to do," Repton told Business Insider Australia. "The idea behind it was we both wanted to travel and have the freedom to move around, but also to complete a really worthwhile project."

The duo had been living in rental properties before they gave them up, put some things in storage and moved into the bus.

"We sold off pretty much everything to come on this trip with the intention that it's going to be a long-term lifestyle," Shaw said.

They embarked on the project in 2018, buying a $20,000 bus in July before picking it up a month later.

"We waited about a month until we could pick it up because it was still being used as a school bus," Shaw said.
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Starting from scratch, they pulled the seats out and stripped the bus down - taking out parts like the floor boards and ceiling until what was left was the metal framework and the windows.

From there, the couple did around four months of research on how to build it up, while also using that time to escape the heat.

"It was summer at the time, so it was really, really hot to try and work in it," Shaw said. "On a 40-degree day it was impossible to do any work."

With the research done, the couple began the construction work, putting the floorboards, roof panels and walls up.

"We had it all mapped out on the floor with masking tape as to where everything would go, which changed slightly when we realised you couldn't run plumbing in certain directions because there were beams in the way or the engine was in the way," Shaw said.

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The couple did almost all of the work themselves except for using professionals for electricity and gas.

"It was really a step by step process because we had no experience in this sort of project coming into it," Shaw said. "You would get to a job like doing the shower, for example, and then we'd have to learn how to do the plumbing - what plumbing fittings to use, how to do the drainage, what water tanks to use."

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Inside the bus turned home
The bus includes a bedroom at the back, two wardrobes, a full-sized shower and a (composting) toilet. There's a kitchen area, a washing machine and two day beds that double as guest beds.

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"We can have two people sleepover and stay in the bus," Repton said.

They have capacity for 600 litres of water, an instant hot water system and enough battery power to run air conditioning and other appliances like the kettle and toaster.

"We can live off the grid for sort of three weeks at a time," Shaw said.

In the front is seating for one driver and three passengers when the bus is on the road. On the back, they tow a trailer behind which has a dinghy and a four-wheel drive attached.

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The pros and cons of living on a bus
The couple had a lot of positives to share about living in the bus, with one of the biggest advantages being that they have everything right there with them without having to unpack and set up - like a tent.

"We've got everything we own on the bus - it's home," Repton said. "We just roll up and we're set up."

Other benefits? Having a lot more space to store their items and the low cost of living compared to staying in, say, a caravan park. On top of paying for the bus, the building process cost roughly $40,000.

WOULD NOT HAVE GOT MUCH OF A MOBILE HOME FOR $60K EVEN SECONDHAND, AND WOULD HAVE HAD MUCH LESS SPACE . WHAT A BARGAIN AND A GREAT CONVERSION TOO. I KNOW A CALLER WHO HAD A CONVERTED MINIBUS , THAT HE TRAVELLED IN TO CONVENTIONS AND SPECIAL WEEKEND FESTIVAL AND HE DOUBLED HIS MONEY WHEN HE RETIRED AND SOLD HIS.
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"Some of the spots we get to park in are just incredible," Shaw said. "They're million dollar views and you're paying maybe $10, $15 a night to stay there if it's not free. So it's a fairly cheap way of living."

One challenge with a bus is learning how to park it and having to maintain it.

"We've always got this never-ending list," Shaw said. "As soon as we shrink it, it grows again. But that's alright because that keeps us busy."

Between going on adventures on the boat or heading to a national park, the couple also gets some down time where they can work on maintenance.

Travelling across parts of Australia
For people thinking of converting a bus into a home, Repton and Shaw advise looking at other setups online and speaking to people who have done it.

And be prepared to be involved in the process for the long haul.

"Don't underestimate how difficult and long it's going to be," Shaw said. "Because we see a lot of people starting them and a lot of people selling them three-quarters complete because they've run out of money or they've had some sort of personal life issue."

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The couple had planned to kick off their bus trip earlier this year but postponed it because of the pandemic. They ended up leaving this July.

"We just went up the WA coast and then crossed into the Northern Territory last week," Shaw said.

While they were concerned about making the trip to the NT because of the border closures in WA, they "bit the bullet" with the hope of returning to their home in the next year or so.

"From here we're going to go down to Adelaide and then once we get to Adelaide we'll see what happens," Shaw said. "Then we'll probably head east and then maybe do an anti-clockwise lap and then get back to WA in a year or two's time."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/travel/news/t ... ue#image=8

AN AUSTRALIAN CDC ?
Australia would have its own centre for disease control under a Labor government
Labor will use the opening of budget week to commit to establishing an Australian Centre for Disease Control, saying a dedicated body could have avoided some of the under preparation that was evident at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Australian Medical Association earlier this year urged the Morrison government to set up an Australian national centre for disease control to provide independent advice to governments about the management of pandemics, and ensure a national stockpile of essential equipment was in place for the next crisis.

The AMA’s then president, Tony Bartone, made the pitch, backed by the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (ANMF), during an appearance at the Senate inquiry into the government’s management of the Covid-19 crisis in late June, noting he was aware of some resistance within government to creating a new health bureaucracy.

A parliamentary inquiry in 2013 called for an independent review to assess the feasibility of a national CDC. But the Coalition rejected that recommendation in a response to the inquiry five years later.

Opposition leader Anthony Albanese will confirm on Tuesday Labor will establish a CDC if it wins the next federal election. Albanese will argue the coronavirus pandemic has made the case why pandemic preparations need to improve.

Under the Labor proposal, which was briefed to reporters without a costing attached to the measure, an Australian CDC would have capacity to monitor current and emerging threats and work with state governments and medical service providers to improve surge readiness in both health and aged care settings.

As well as working to combat the spread of infectious diseases, the CDC would also work on strategies to prevent chronic illnesses.

The CDC would manage the national medical stockpile and run preparedness drills. It would also collaborate with other countries on responses to a pandemic threat.

With MPs back in Canberra ahead of Tuesday’s budget and the resumption of parliament, Albanese told the Labor caucus budget week marked a shift in strategy for the opposition.

He said Labor had been constructive as the Morrison government faced up to the challenges associated with the coronavirus pandemic, but it was now time for Labor to start laying out a more detailed alternative given voters could be going to the polls next year.

In relation to the CDC commitment, Albanese said Australia was the only country in the OECD not to have a CDC-equivalent, and there had not been a pandemic drill at the national level for 12 years.

“Ask any Australian and they’ll tell you our response to the coronavirus pandemic was too slow, too reactive and too uncoordinated,” the Labor leader said in a statement.

“We can’t be left playing catch up again – we cannot afford another Ruby Princess, or another tragic disaster in aged care,” he said. “Our health, our lives and our economy all depend on us getting our response to future pandemics right.”

Albanese says he would work with state governments on the design of the body.

The AMA has made it clear a CDC should be its own entity rather than part of the apparatus of government. In backing an Australian CDC earlier this year, Bartone said it was imperative that a CDC work “frankly, fearlessly and independently of governments of the day” and be in a position to collaborate with all the public health expertise in the community.

There has been some concern in the health and medical communities that the current pandemic advisory body, the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee, has been absorbed during the crisis as a sub-committee of the national cabinet.

The CDC model envisaged by Labor would not have statutory independence but it would be similar to the Therapeutic Goods Administration, an advisory body that sits within the federal health portfolio.

Like the TGA, it would provide independent advice and governments would make their own decisions informed by that advice.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

QUANTAS INDUSTRIAL ISSUES
Qantas wins court case over aircraft engineers stood down due to coronavirus pandemic
A decision by Qantas to stand down hundreds of aircraft engineers without pay during the COVID-19 pandemic has been vindicated by the Federal Court.

About 450 Qantas and Jetstar maintenance engineers were among two-thirds of the workforce benched for a month from late March as passenger numbers declined.

In a case being closely watched for its likely ramifications outside aviation, Qantas sought a declaration from the court that the stoppage of work was for reasons it could not be held reasonably responsible for.

But the Australian Licenced Aircraft Engineers Association argued a lack of customers, no matter how stark, should not be considered a stoppage of work under the workers' agreement.

Justice Geoffrey Flick today ruled in the airline's favour and found the stoppage of work was due to the substantial stoppage of domestic and international passenger flights between March 29 and April 22.

This "dramatic downturn" was not the result of any conduct of the airlines, the court found.

"It was an economic reality forced upon the airlines by reason of the global pandemic and the conduct of the Commonwealth, state and territory governments in restricting travel and movements," Justice Flick said.

"The facts of the present case, it is respectfully concluded, come nowhere close to a situation where other steps could reasonably have been pursued by Qantas or Jetstar."

Qantas claimed the stand-downs were made in accordance with clauses in its agreements and the workers could not be "usefully employed".

Barrister Rowena Orr QC, for Qantas, previously said the pandemic had "challenged the very viability" of the airlines.

Last month, she told the court Qantas would have run out of money in eight to 10 weeks if it had continued regular scheduled flights.

All other cost saving measures had already been implemented and proved insufficient, Ms Orr said.

But the union's barrister, Lucy Saunders, argued it was Qantas that made the decision to fly or not to fly and therefore the decision to stand down workers was within the company's control.

The judge rejected the union's argument that the stoppage was the result of decisions from airline management.

Justice Flick described the suggestion that the action taken by the airlines was within their own volition "disingenuous".

He said the circumstances in which the stand-down clauses were invoked were "hopefully unique and never to be repeated".

https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/markets ... d=msedgdhp

STATE BORDERS RELAXING
States set to reopen as virus cases fall
Australia's gradual emergence from COVID-19 restrictions could accelerate in coming weeks as case numbers continue to decline.

Victoria recorded nine new cases on Monday but for the first time in almost a month the state - and the nation - did not suffer any coronavirus deaths.

The national death toll remains at 894.

Melbourne's 14-day average must be below five, with fewer than five mystery cases, for lockdown restrictions to further ease on October 19.

The latest figures take the average to 11.6, with Victoria's Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton describing the prospect of reaching the target as a "line ball".

"It's not certain one way or the other," Professor Sutton said.

NSW has now gone 10 days in a row with no new locally transmitted cases, with the state's only new case on Monday a returned overseas traveller in hotel quarantine.

Control of community transmission is the key condition for NSW residents being able to enter Queensland from November 1.

People in regional Victoria could be allowed to travel to the Northern Territory from November 2 if their case numbers remain low.

But while Australia had just 11 new cases on Monday, including one in hotel quarantine in Western Australia, low test numbers are a concern.

Authorities in both NSW and Queensland urged people to get tested if they are feeling unwell.

Local councils, meanwhile, were forced to close some Sydney beaches due to overcrowding fears on Monday's public holiday.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has promised a jobs-focused budget on Tuesday to steer the economy out of the coronavirus-driven recession.

But it will also be a financial statement that could see the deficit blow out to over $200 billion, while including income tax cuts to get people spending again.

The climb out of recession will depend on virus case numbers dropping and a vaccine being rolled out in 2021.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Oct 06, 2020 10:10 am

6 OCTOBER DATA
NINE DAY WITH NO COMMUNITY TRANSMISSION IN NSW.

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CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:42 am

7 OCT VIC

6 new COVID-19 cases and 2 deaths recorded in Victoria in past 24 hours
Victorian Premier, Daniel Andrews, says a cluster linked to Chadstone shopping centre shows how infectious the virus can be.
Victoria reaches lower infection milestone
Melbourne REPORTED on Wednesday the lowest two-week average of new cases .

For the first time since the second coronavirus outbreak caused more than 800 deaths in the state - more than 90% of the country's 897 virus-related deaths - the two-week average has fallen below 10.

The metric is key as officials in the second-most-populous state are reluctant to ease mobility restrictions until the rolling average in the two-week window falls below five.

"The strategy is working," premier Daniel Andrews told reporters at his daily briefing. "Its success is pinned ultimately to whether symptomatic people come forward and get tested."

Australia has so far reported more than 27,000 COVID-19 cases, with Victoria accounting for about 75% of infections. In the previous 24 hours, the state had found six new cases and reported two more deaths, Andrews said.

In the neighboring New South Wales (NSW) state, the most populous, officials found three new locally transmitted infections overnight, putting an end to a 11-day run of zero such cases.

"It is a concern when you have a handful of community transmission, but ... we're always going to have cases pop up because we're in a pandemic, but we're also in an economy which is open where people are undertaking their business," NSW premier Gladys Berejiklian told reporters.

Although the number of deaths and infections in Australia from COVID-19 has been low compared with many other countries, the outbreak has driven the country to its deepest economic slump on record.

On Tuesday, Australia's conservative government unveiled billions in fiscal stimulus as part of plans to boost jobs and help its economy out of its historic recession.

Its budget assumes the country will be able to contain COVID-19 outbreaks by the end of the year, the majority of its inter-state borders will be reopened, and a vaccine will be developed in 2021.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/au ... d=msedgdhp

Chadstone cluster grows, but Melbourne's rolling average falls below 10
3 more coronavirus cases have been linked to Melbourne's Chadstone shopping centre cluster, as Victorian health authorities try to stop the "challenging" outbreak spreading even further.

There are now a total of 31 cases connected to the outbreak, in Melbourne's south-east, which is the state's largest cluster outside of the aged care sector.

Authorities are also trying to contain an outbreak in the regional town of Kilmore, where two people have been infected after a case connected to the Chadstone outbreak dined in a local cafe.

Public health officials have doorknocked every retailer in the Chadstone shopping centre.

Jeroen Weimar, who is in charge of coronavirus testing at Victoria's Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), said more than 1,300 people had been tested in Chadstone in recent days.

"Chadstone has been a particularly challenging outbreak," he said.

"It's still a very active shopping centre for people doing click-and-collect and essential goods."

Mr Weimar said anyone who had been in Chadstone in the past 10 days should get tested, no matter how mild their symptoms were.

But in positive news, Mr Weimar said the Frankston cluster that was identified at the beginning of last week "now looks to be well under control".

There were seven cases in the Frankston cluster and they had remained stable, he said.

"My thanks to the community in Frankston for their support in coming out to get tested and supporting the family at the centre of that particular outbreak," Mr Weimar said.

Melbourne's 14-day rolling average drops below 10
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Victoria has recorded six new coronavirus cases and two further deaths, taking the state's COVID-19 death toll to 809.

Melbourne's 14-day rolling daily case average has fallen to 9.9, while regional Victoria's remains at 0.3.

The two-week total of COVID-19 cases with an unknown source in Melbourne has also dropped, from 13 on Tuesday to 12 on Wednesday.

A large number of 16,429 coronavirus test results were processed overnight.

There are 206 active cases in Victoria, and just two of those are in regional areas outside Melbourne.
Public health officials will look at whether Melbourne can move to the next step in Victoria's roadmap when there's a statewide rolling average below five, and fewer than five mystery cases over a two-week period.

When asked if the Chadstone cluster could derail plans to further lift restrictions, Premier Daniel Andrews again stressed that the "narrative that sits behind the numbers" would be taken into consideration.

"I can't tell how many more cases come out of it tomorrow or the day after," he said.

"I wouldn't be thinking about things in those terms. What I'd be saying is we bring a very, very high standard of public health response to each and every case."

Mr Andrews said public health officials had gone "above and beyond" a "textbook" approach to contact tracing, by doorknocking shops multiple times and engaging with busy businesses in nearby shopping centres.

"This has been very well handled but, at the same time, it just speaks to how wildly infectious it is that it can run," he said.

"Even when it's well handled, you can finish up with 30-plus cases."

There are now 16 Victorians with coronavirus in hospital, including two in intensive care.

Fifty-eight active cases are linked to aged care settings, down from 66 on Tuesday.

'Testing numbers are looking solid'
Across Victoria, about 16,000 people were tested on Tuesday, and 96 per cent of tests were returned within 24 hours, Mr Weimar said.

"Our testing numbers are looking solid," he told ABC Radio Melbourne.

Mr Weimar said the state had 2,600 people working in contact tracing, but the effectiveness of the response was largely reliant on people coming forward to get tested as soon as they showed symptoms.

"That's how all of us can help crush down the last bits of coronavirus in the state," he said.

"It continues to be wildly infectious.

"We're getting hold of this as quickly as we humanly can.

"We're reliant on people coming forward early to get tested and we're reliant on people, when they are contacted, to make sure they're self-isolating so we can contain this thing really, really quickly."


More supermarkets added to list of coronavirus exposure sites
Last night the Department of Health and Human Services updated its list of high-risk locations to include:

Coles Williamstown — exposure between 7:00pm and 10:00pm on September 30
Aldi Keysborough — exposure between 3:45pm and 4:00pm on October 1
Coles Westfield Southland — exposure between 4:45pm and 5:14pm on October 2


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CHADSTONE REGIONAL VICTORIA CLUSTER
Chadstone cluster grows, Kilmore residents await COVID test results as state records six new cases
Victoria has recorded six new cases of coronavirus and two more deaths in the past day as the Chadstone cluster grew to 31 people and hundreds of Kilmore residents came forward for testing.

Victoria has recorded six new cases of coronavirus and two more deaths in the past day as the Chadstone cluster grew to 31 people and hundreds of Kilmore residents came forward for testing

Four of the new cases are linked to known outbreaks, two are being investigated.

There are now 206 active cases in the state and today's numbers bring Victoria's rolling 14-day case average to 10.2.

That number needs to be lower than five - and there also needs to be fewer than five mystery cases - for Melbourne to take the next step out of lockdown on October 19, though Premier Daniel Andrews has said the information behind those numbers will also be a consideration.

The two people who died were a woman in her 80s and a man in his 90s.

More than 200 residents of the Victorian town of Kilmore came forward for COVID testing on Tuesday, after the virus spread to the area via a traveller connected to the Chadstone outbreak, which has grown to 31 cases.

Jeroen Weimar of the Department of Health and Human Services said anyone who visited Oddfellows cafe in Kilmore between last Wednesday and Saturday, where the virus was spread by a visiting Melbourne resident, should get tested and self-isolate immediately.

Many had already done so, Mr Weimar said, and he praised the way the business had handled the situation.

"This all started with actually some really good behaviour by the cafe, both the waitress who got tested as soon as she felt the onset of symptoms, got tested early and that's how we were able to identify an issue in Kilmore at all," Mr Weimar said.

"We've also followed up - thanks to the excellent records the cafe has kept - they gave us 177 customers who have been to the cafe over the four days.

"Each of those people has been followed up and as a result, we have 177 people and the people that they live with ... who are now self-isolating. That's a big ask. We're asking them to do that because they are close contact of a suspected case."

The Victorian government is trialing this tactic of asking "third ring" contacts to isolate to try to catch any new cases before they spread.

"They had a call yesterday morning that said who do you live with, we need all those people who you live with to stay within the house and we will arrange testing for you to make sure that we keep them safe.

Mr Weimar says a cluster at Frankston was now under control, but the outbreaks at Chadstone and Kilmore continued to be of concern.

About 1300 people have been tested at Chadstone over the past few days.

"Our message remains for people working at Chadstone, for people who have shopped at or been at Chadstone in the last 10 days, if you have any symptoms, no matter how slight, you should come forward and get tested," Mr Weimar said.

The same approach is starting to be used with the Chadstone cluster too, but has only been started with the latest cases Mr Weimar said.

Mr Weimar denied that using the approach earlier on with the Chadstone cluster would have helped stop the spread of the outbreak.

"I don't think so. If you look at the Chadstone cluster, we got a good grip on it first off," he said.

"Clearly, we have a few days before anybody is tested symptomatically, before anybody has come forward, where you've got people who are infectious going about their work and we've clearly seen transmission during the first days at Chadstone before we knew there was a positive case there - where they've transmitted it to other workers in that complex and then people go home at night so they're a high risk of spreading it to people they live with."

The total number of active cases in Victoria now includes 58 linked with aged care outbreaks (down from 66 yesterday), and 26 healthcare workers (down from 27).

There are now 16 Victorians fighting the virus in hospital, including two in intensive care.

More than 16,400 tests were processed on Tuesday.

ALDI and Coles on red alert after shopper tested positive to COVID-19
Aldi and Coles customers in Melbourne have been put on high alert after two shoppers and an employee tested positive to COVID-19.

Anyone who was at the Coles store in Williamstown on September 30, between 7pm and 10pm, and the Coles at Westfield Southland in Cheltenham on October 2, between 4.45pm-5.15pm should look out for symptoms.

People who shopped at the Keysborough Aldi between 3.45pm and 4pm on October 1 have also been put on high alert.

Shoppers were told they needed to get tested if they experienced COVID-19 symptoms.

The Department of Health said shoppers at the Cheltenham Coles and the Keysborough Aldi tested positive while an employee of the Williamstown store also contracted coronavirus.

The warning came as the state recorded six new coronavirus cases and two deaths, bringing the state's death toll to 809 and the national figure to 897.

Health authorities are concerned about outbreaks occurring in retail areas after a cluster was tracked back to a Melbourne butcher shop.

Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton on Tuesday confirmed 28 cases were linked to the Butcher Club at Chadstone Shopping Centre, up from 24 on Monday.

It consists of at least eight staff, 11 close contacts and four customers.

Premier Daniel Andrews said the cluster was another example of how 'wildly infectious' the virus was.

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Immunocompromised Victorians 'pleasantly surprised' by compliance with COVID-19 restrictions
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Gerald Wiblin has Type-1 diabetes, which puts him at a higher risk of dying from COVID-19.
Gerald Wiblin lives with diabetes and he says he is grateful that people in Victoria are remaining vigilant with mask-wearing and physical distancing to control the spread of COVID-19.

Having Type 1 diabetes makes the coronavirus more of a threat to Mr Wiblin.

An analysis, published in medical journal The Lancet, found people with Type 1 diabetes had significantly increased odds of dying after being hospitalised with COVID-19.

So, as the virus's tendrils crept across the world, Mr Wiblin felt a terrifying sense of unease.

"I think I've been into the supermarket four times in the last six months," he said.

Having recently moved to Ballarat from Melbourne, Mr Wiblin now lives in an area that has not recorded a new case of COVID-19 in over a month.

But he has been heartened by the sight of regional Victorians wearing masks, using hand sanitiser and physically distancing.

Although these lingering restrictions may seem overly cautious to some, it is people like Mr Wiblin that they are designed to protect.

Easing restrictions in regional Victoria 'not safe': CHO
Victorian Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton says it is still too early to fully ease restrictions in regional Victoria.

"We are all trying to protect regional Victoria from any new cases," Professor Sutton said late last week.

"It's not safe to open up."

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has spoken about "jealously" guarding Victoria's low COVID-19 case numbers, and yesterday a regional Victorian cafe worker tested positive for coronavirus after coming in contact with a customer from Melbourne.

"If you're just an ordinary hardworking Victorian — a law-abiding person — you have to wear a mask," Mr Andrews.

"You have to keep 1.5 metres [apart]. You have to wash your hands. All these things are critically important, and no-one has the right to make a choice [of], 'I don't want to do that.'

"The consequences aren't just about you; they're about everyone."

'I moved into my garage'
When the pandemic hit, Mr Wiblin was living in a Melbourne share house.

"I was there living with housemates who continued to go to work and go to the shops every day," he said.

He had to mitigate the risk of infection that his living situation posed.

"I actually moved into my garage so that I could avoid being in the house as much as possible; the only time I went in was to shower," Mr Wiblin said.

"And after three weeks of living in my garage, I moved into an empty house that belonged to a friend of mine's grandmother, who had moved into a nursing home."

When that house was put on the market, Mr Wiblin realised he could not afford a place of his own in Melbourne, so moved to Ballarat.

"I was really pleasantly surprised that even though it's been six or seven weeks since a positive case was diagnosed in Ballarat … everyone is still taking it seriously," he said.

"I've had tradespeople come through the house, and everyone's wearing masks.

"At the shopping centre everyone lines up for the hand sanitiser. Waiting in line at K-Mart everyone's spaced out.

"It's nice to know that people here are still taking it seriously even though it's been so long since the last positive case."

What keeps people following the rules?
Jane Speight is the director of the Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes (ACBRD) at Deakin University.

She says for people to continue to comply with COVID-19 restrictions, they need to know that their efforts in following the rules are having an impact on the virus.

"It depends on the extent to which people see it [the restrictions] as effective and it also comes down to the social norms," Professor Speight said.

"If you go outside your house and you see everyone else wearing masks, then the tendency is to wear the mask, because you're not necessarily going to want to be the odd one out."

Professor Speight says the insidious nature of the coronavirus is also a challenge when it comes to people complying with the restrictions.

"I think the biggest problem we have is that the threat isn't visible, so it's really difficult for people to maintain an appropriate level of precaution," she said.

"Daniel Andrews has been firm, but fair, and has been a very clear leader in what he wants to try and achieve, and he talks about achieving those things in a very empathetic way."

Vigilance allows for self-sufficiency
Mr Wiblin is doing all he can to minimise his own risk of infection from COVID-19, but he is relying on everyone else doing the same.

"We've had over 800 deaths in Victoria, and for each of those 800 people there's friends and family who are affected by it," he said.

"Being vigilant is the best way to protect those who are vulnerable."

The more people Mr Wiblin sees wearing a mask and sanitising their hands, the safer he will feel when venturing out to buy groceries.

"I really appreciate the fact that there's a lot of people out there doing the right thing; it helps me try and live a life where I'm somewhat self-sufficient."

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Premier Andrews drops proposed new law to allow the state government to deputize qualified workers such as Worksafe officials with the power to enforce coronavirus restrictions and make arrests .
Daniel Andrews has backed down on his bid to get sweeping new powers to let any government official arrest Victorians who are not complying with covid restrictions .

A proposed new law would have allowed the state government to give anyone it chooses - such as Worksafe officials - the power to enforce coronavirus restrictions and make arrests.

The unprecedented plan would also have allowed officials to detain people they suspect may spread coronavirus even if they have done nothing wrong.

What did Daniel Andrews want to do?
Allow any person the government considered appropriate to be authorised to exercise emergency powers including make arrests.

There would be no requirement for them to be police officers, or even public servants.

Allow an authorised officer to detain any person they believe is likely to fail to comply with an emergency direction and is a close contact or a Covid-19 patient not given clearance from self-isolation.

The suspect can be detained for so long as the authorised officer reasonably believes the person in detention is likely to fail to comply with an emergency direction.

Read the bill here

The COVID-19 Omnibus (Emergency Measures) and Other Acts Amendment Bill 2020 passed the lower house but will be amended after objections from upper house MPs, reported The Age.

The amendments will include specifying which government officials will be given the power to make arrests and removing the plan to let them make preventive arrests.

It comes after eighteen esteemed former judges and lawyers wrote an open letter warning that the proposed law was 'unprecedented, excessive and open to abuse'.

Allowing citizens to make arrests 'on the basis of a belief that the detained person is unlikely to comply with emergency directions' is 'unprecedented, excessive and open to abuse,' the lawyers said.

One of those lawyers, Ross Gillies QC, told Daily Mail Australia he feared power-hungry officials who enjoy exerting authority may abuse the powers given to them.

'I don't trust someone who is nominated by a public servant with the power to make arrests. I have real abiding concern that power is a very dangerous thing,' he said.

'Some people are excited by power and the ability to exert authority over someone else. There is the potential for enormous injustice.'

'Someone might grab someone and say "I have reason to believe you are a Covid carrier or know someone who has Covid and I apprehend you".

'There would be no remedy in that situation. That may be the worst-case scenario but we know that can happen.'

Gideon Rozner, Director of Policy at free market think tank the Institute of Public Affairs told Daily Mail Australia the legislation was 'extremely dangerous' and would create the 'Daniel Andrews Stasi'.

'It will allow Dan Andrews to effectively appoint anyone he wants as an authorised officer, with extraordinarily broad discretion to enforce Victoria's emergency powers,' he said.

'Union leaders could be appointed to unleash retribution on small business owners who speak out against lockdowns.

'Labor Party officials could be appointed to intimidate political opponents. 'I Stand With Dan' types could be appointed to spy on their friends and neighbours.

'Not since East Germany have we seen such a monstrous web of government surveillance. The Victorian Parliament must vote down this bill and say no to the Dan Andrews Stasi.'

Mr Andrews said he did not agree the proposed legislation was excessive or open to abuse.

'In terms of recruitment, process, oversight - all that can be managed,' Mr Andrews said in response to the lawyers' letter.
<< no mate , this is perfectly reasonable , and Australia is not the cold war Soviet Union >>

'In terms of the first point, though, the notion it is unprecedented, yes, it is. Because we're in a one-in-100-year event. This is not in any way business as usual.'

Attorney-General Jill Hennessy said the bill would be amended.'Whilst we think the concerns raised in the original bill didn't have a legal basis, we are keen to address the majority of the concerns,' she said.

'We are deeply concerned by the passage of the COVID-19 Omnibus (Emergency Measures) and Other Acts Amendment Bill 2020 (Bill) through the Legislative Assembly.

Emergency powers already allow authorised officers under the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 (Vic) to detain people and to restrict movement.

The Bill would expand the emergency powers to allow an authorised officer to detain:

• any person that the authorised officer reasonably believes is likely to fail to comply with an emergency direction and is a close contact of a person diagnosed with COVID-19 (or a person diagnosed with COVID-19) not given clearance from self-isolation;

• for so long as the authorised officer reasonably believes the person in detention is likely to fail to comply with an emergency direction.

The Bill would also allow any person the Secretary considered appropriate to be authorised to exercise emergency powers. There would be no requirement that persons authorised be police officers, or even public servants.

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PREPARING FOR COMING VICTORIA BUSHFIRE SEASON - COMPLICATIONS FOR MELBOURNIANS .
Melburnians with regional holiday homes say they need coronavirus travel permits before bushfire season
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Shirley Hinkley hasn't visited her Daylesford property in months, and worries it needs immediate maintenance ahead of summer.
For the past 40 years, Shirley Hinkley has spent this time of year preparing her Daylesford holiday house for the upcoming summer bushfire season.

"The area around the house, there is about an acre that is mowed … the rest of the property, even though it is well-treed it still needs the undergrowth from the bush and the trees to be cleared as much as possible," she says.

Her holiday house sits on 5 acres of land and requires a fair bit of work ahead of summer — but for months, Ms Hinkley hasn't been able to get there.

She lives in Airport West in Melbourne and usually spends every weekend in Daylesford.

But coronavirus travel restrictions mean Melburnians can not travel further than 5 kilometres from their homes, unless it is for essential work or activities.

So far, bushfire preparation for a second property has not been considered an essential reason to travel.

Coronavirus restrictions are forecast to next ease in Melbourne on October 19, but it is not yet clear what extra travel, if any, will be allowed.

Victoria's Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton did say earlier in the week that bushfire preparation will need to be done in regional Victoria and the State Government is working on allowances for it, but so far no announcement has been made.

For Melburnians with regional properties, the worry is timing.

They want to know when they will be able to start bushfire preparations and if they will be given the time they need ahead of summer.

"This time leading up to December is our prime time to be clearing and burning off branches and leaves and undergrowth," Shirley explains.

She wants to get to her holiday house while burn-offs are still allowed.

She's happy to isolate on her property, to make sure there isn't a COVID-19 risk.

"We are in the bush, I can literally drive from my front gate in Melbourne to my front gate at Daylesford and not see a soul," she says.

She just wants the chance to protect a holiday house that has 40 years of memories for her family.

Property owners say they need clarity on travel rules
Jenny Cato lives in Collingwood in Melbourne's inner-north and is in the process of purchasing a property in Castlemaine she hopes to enjoy with her family.

"We are due to settle on the 15th of this month and there is a lot of ambiguity around the rules in this regard," she says.

She says she has not been able to get a clear answer about whether she can travel to the property for a final inspection before settlement.

But even more than that, she wants clarity on when she can travel to her new holiday home to get it ready for the upcoming bushfire season.

She says the house has been empty for the past year, and there is a lot of work to do.

"It is in a red-hot fire zone and we need to do some pretty heavy lifting in order to mitigate any risk of fire coming through," she says.

She has been in contact with the local CFA and wants to get advice on the work that needs to be done, but is starting to worry about the timing.

"If we haven't got everything sorted by mid-November we are just raising the risk for the property and for ourselves," she says.

She also says she is happy to isolate on her property, but wants to make sure it makes it safely through this summer.

Government urged to find a solution before Melbourne Cup weekend
Surf Coast Shire councillor Tony Revell is a CFA volunteer in Anglesea, where he estimates around 50 per cent of homes are owned by people who do not permanently live in the popular tourist town.

He says ensuring property owners have done enough to prepare for the bushfire season is always a challenge, but that has been compounded by the restrictions preventing Melbourne residents from visiting their regional Victorian properties.

"It's confusing," he says.

"We are getting asked 'when can we come down' and the short answer is you're not allowed to come down at the moment, in terms of how the Government is interpreting that regulation."

He says the Government and CFA advice is that Melbourne residents who own properties in bushfire-prone areas should hire contractors to clear the properties, but he says this is not always an easy option for people due to the cost.

"What we are disappointed about this year is that we're coming up to the Melbourne Cup weekend [on October 31], which is the one big clean-up weekend when people come down," he explains.

"Whether they're going to be able to do it this year remains to be seen."

Cr Revell acknowledges the Government has to carefully balance the risk of Melburnians unwittingly taking the virus into regional areas against the hazard posed by properties left underprepared for the bushfire season.

"But we remain concerned, given the propensity for significant loss in regions like Anglesea, Aireys Inlet and our coastal towns," he says.

While Cr Revell is keen to see a plan laid out to help property owners prepare as soon as possible, he says the La Niña weather pattern forecast for this summer should mean a delayed start to the bushfire season.

Connecting with CFA brigades is also an essential bushfire preparation, former fire chief says
Ewan Waller, who is a former chief officer with Forest Fire Management Victoria, says some parts of his community in East Gippsland are very dry after months with little rain, and notes Bairnsdale saw a nuisance fire over the weekend.

He says now is the time to prepare for summer.

"Spring can turn very quickly, we get hot drying winds and you can go from OK to not OK very quickly," he says.

Mr Waller says it is critical for property owners to spend time connecting with their local CFA and neighbours to make sure they are well-informed about the fire risks of the area.

"Talking to experienced people like the CFA brigade captains and sharing information and mentally getting prepared, where a fire will come from," he says.

"It's the start of the planning process for that summer, getting your thoughts straight with your family and your thoughts straight with your neighbours.

"It's all about coming into summer being logical and mature and well-prepared so you have that confidence that you can perform maturely if a fire does come your way."

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GREEDY
Hundreds of Jim's Mowing FRANCHISEES join class action against government
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<< I've dealt with JIMS , wanted the local lawncare franchisee to do my lawn but you have sign up to mowing EEVRY TWO WEEKS YEAR ROUND ( even ii the lawn is not growing due to drought or winter ). I wasn't about to sign up for this , they are not cheap either.
About 700 Jim's Mowing businesses who were forced to stop working under Melbourne's Stage Four coronavirus lockdown are set to join a class action lawsuit against the Victorian government.

The lawsuit is likely to be the biggest in Australian history, with one legal expert saying it would 'dwarf' any previous class action.

The managing partner of the law firm handling the case, Tony Carbone from Carbone Lawyers, said his clients would be seeking $20million in compensation.

'The bottom line is these gardeners should have been working, how is it possible that a gardener working on their own outside can infect anyone,' Mr Carbone told Newscorp.

He argues the Daniel Andrews government's decision making on who could and could not work during the lockdowns was 'arbitrary' and left thousands of people struggling financially.

Under the city's strict Stage Four COVID-19 lockdown a raft of 'non-essential' businesses were told to stop work including gardening and lawn-maintenance workers under a decision by the Andrews government.

According to Jim's Mowing founder, Jim Penman, 700 of the company's franchisees and self-employed tradespeople had lost about $3,000 in income a week since the restrictions began 10 weeks ago.

He also claimed the Premier's decision was arbitrary and has previously asked for proof gardeners working alone outside had been linked to any cases of coronavirus.

'The Premier's arbitrary action in ignoring the advice of the Department of Health and Human Services and barring sole operators from working, brought needless loss and misery upon many,' Mr Penman said.

Mr Penman also claimed that council gardeners continued working in groups throughout the lockdown highlighting a double standard imposed by the government.

'Council workers are doing the same job, and in groups, yet my company and contractors are being prevented from earning a living – there is absolutely a legitimate claim for compensation here.' Mr Penman previously said.

'I'm not happy taxpayers will have to pay once we proceed legally, but my workers are being denied a chance to work, earn a living, pay taxes and contribute to the economy.'

Mr Penman and Carbone lawyers have agreed to a 'no-win-no-fee' contract with the law firm getting a 10 per cent fee of any payout.

'Yes I've lost a bit of money during this but I'm not interested in getting that money back, I just want every one of my franchisees to get every cent back because they're the ones who are doing it tough and going through a lot of financial pressure,' Mr Penman said.

Melbourne's Stage Four rules were slightly eased on September 28 with gardening and landscaping businesses allowed to return to work.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Victorian Premier's office for comment.

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COVIDIOTS
'Never acceptable' to attend work if unwell: Andrews
“It is just never acceptable to go to work if you’re feeling unwell,” he said.

“If you’ve got symptoms the only thing you should be doing is getting tested. You should not be going to work. You should not be making that judgement.

“There's every chance that you've got this, and there's an absolute certainty that if you go into a workplace environment, almost any workplace environment, with symptoms, you will spread it, you will give it to someone else.

“It only takes one person to do the wrong thing and it can be, you know, 30, 40, 50, in some cases hundreds of positive cases can come from that."

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<< PLEASE DON'T FOLLOW TRUMP'S LEAD ON THIS , IT'S SELFISH AND DANGEROUS TO EVERYONE YOU COME INTO CONTACT WITH.

'Pet shop Karen' breathes on staff after refusing to wear mask
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A woman dubbed 'pet shop Karen' refused to wear a mask and breathed on workers in defiance of coronavirus regulations.

Fish and Feather in Kilsyth, east of Melbourne's CBD, shared a picture of the woman taken on CCTV when she visited the store on Sunday afternoon.

The owner claimed that she entered without wearing a mask and was rude to staff from the outset.

She was asked to wear a protective face mask in order to be served, but manager Naomi Lawlor claims the woman yelled 'no'.

'She started ranting and raving that she didn't have COVID and doesn't need to wear a mask,' Ms Lawlor told the Lilydale and Yarra Valley Leader.

Instead, the woman 'deliberately breathed on a staff member' before she left the store.

Not wearing a face mask without an exemption and deliberately breathing or coughing on others is punishable by a fine under new COVID-19 legislation.

The Fish and Feather owner also revealed they knew the woman's name and address.

After she was refused service, the woman is accused of ringing the store repeatedly and hanging up when they finally answered the phone.

The childish prank meant the store was able to find out exactly who she was by tracing the phone number she called from.
<< PRANK ??
THIS IS NO PRANK , IT IS A VERY SERIOUS ASSAULT , AND HAS THE REAL POTENTIAL TO KILL THE STAFF SHE ASSAULTED AND I HOPE THE VIC POLICE TRACK THIS PSCYCHO DOWN AND TAKE OUT OF PUBLIC CIRCULATION FOR A VERY LONG TIME AND FINE HE INTO FINANCIAL DESTRUCTION.


'Take note of caller ID,' a post shared on Facebook from the mum-and-dad store read.

'[Your] number ends in 227, you're in the white pages and you live more than 5km away.'

It is an offence to travel more than 5km from your home in Melbourne under current coronavirus restrictions, which were implemented to stem the spread of the second wave.

The woman also signed into the guest room when she arrived.

Customers who visit the family-owned pet store expressed disappointment in the woman for putting staff and other customers at risk.

The overwhelming majority said they hoped she would be caught and fined for appearing to flout coronavirus restrictions.

The store claimed police have been made aware of the incident and have indicated that they will follow up on the claims.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Victoria Police for comment.

What is a 'Karen'?
A 'Karen' is a newly-emerged term for a self-righteous woman, usually middle-aged, who tells people how to do their jobs, asserts their rights and complains to the manager.

The origins of the term are unclear, however it quickly became popular in meme culture on internet forums such as Reddit to describe problematic women.

A Karen meme is often combined with the quote: 'Can I speak to the manager?'

It is also associated with anti-vaccination activists who favour unproven essential oils to medical science.

The 'Karen' was also associated with a side-swept bob haircut that is long at the front and short at the back.

Victoria recorded six new cases of COVID-19 overnight and two more deaths from the virus - but the figures may still not be low enough to justify a further easing of restrictions in Melbourne.

The 14-day rolling average in metropolitan Melbourne decreased to 9.9 from 10.6 on Wednesday, while the number of cases with an unknown source fell from 13 to 12.

The Andrews government has though set an ambitious target of a rolling two-week average of just five cases a day if lockdown is to be eased by October 19.

Under stage-three restriction easing, Melbourne's five million residents would be allowed to leave the home without restraint and gather outdoors in groups of up to 10 people.

Up to 10 people would also be able to eat together at restaurants and cafes - both of which are only allowed to serve takeaway and delivery under the current rules.

The state's Chief Health Officer Professor Brett Sutton said on Monday easing restrictions too soon would risk Victoria losing control over 'mystery cases'.

Regional Victoria has already moved from the second to the third step of removing restrictions on September 15 but Melbourne can only do so if the targets are met.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... hp#image=1

LA NINA IS HERE , FORCAST FOR VICTORIA = START BUILDING YOUR ARK NOW.
Victoria weather warning for heavy rainfall and possible flash flooding as La Niña arrives
A rapidly intensifying system over central Australia is forecast to dump up to 120 millimetres of rain and could cause flash flooding in parts of Victoria.

The system could also produce wind gusts of up to 100 kilometres per hour off the coast.

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) is warning the rain could lead to flash flooding in western and central parts of the state late today, and in the north-east ranges early on Thursday.

Forecasters have been monitoring the low-pressure system, which is linked to tropical moisture levels not seen for years.

The low is expected to rapidly deepen this evening over the northern part of the state before moving south on Thursday.

BOM senior forecaster, Kevin Parkyn, said the weather pattern heralded the start of La Niña.

During a La Niña phase, Australia's northern waters are warm, typically resulting in increased rain for eastern and northern Australia.

"The atmospheric conditions are just ripe for that system to intensify tonight over Victoria," Mr Parkyn said.

There could be flooding on the north-east ranges, with falls of between 80 and 120mm and heavy bursts of up to 60mm at times, he said.

Mr Parkyn said that might not sound a lot but it could cause other problems.

"The concern is we'll see these sort bursts over a few hours, particularly in the north and about the dividing range were we could see falls of 50 to 60 millimetres," he said.

"That's a real concern overnight."

A flood watch is current for north-eastern Victoria and a severe weather warning for heavy rainfall is current for the Mallee, Northern Country, North Central, Wimmera and parts of the Central, South West and North East forecast districts.

There will be widespread falls of 10-30mm across the state.

Melbourne is forecast to get up to 20mm of rain, potentially surpassing its average annual rainfall almost three months before the end of the year.

On Thursday, the focus will shift to damaging winds over the south-west, central coasts and possibly Alpine areas.

"It looks like it will be most intense on Thursday morning just off the south-west coast and that's probably where we're most concerned of these 90-100 kilometre per hour gusts," he said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Oct 07, 2020 6:56 am

7 OCT NSW
BUMMER - SOME LOCAL COMMUNITY COVID19 TRANSMISSION IN SYDNEY (AGAIN)

NSW confirms 3 locally acquired coronavirus cases to break 12-day streak
Three new mystery coronavirus infections have been confirmed in NSW, bringing to an end the state's streak of 12 days without a locally acquired case.

The positive swabs were returned overnight — after NSW's 8.00pm reporting deadline — and will be included in tomorrow's official numbers.

They were discovered in men and women in their 50s in the Campbelltown, Parramatta and Wollondilly local government areas, and are not believed to be linked.

The sources of their infections remain under investigation.

Contact tracers are still assessing potential exposure sites and close contacts and further updates are expected later today.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said she was confident authorities could "get on top" of the new infections quickly.

"This is a good reminder, a good wake-up call, that we're living in a pandemic, that we're managing it well, but that we'll never be out of the woods until there's a vaccine," she said.

Testing essential in Campbelltown, Parramatta and Wollondilly
Chief medical officer Kerry Chant said increased testing was now absolutely essential.

"It's important we're not complacent when we have series of no community transmission," she said.

"We're particularly calling out anyone who lives in the Campbelltown, Parramatta and Wollondilly LGAs."

Ms Berejiklian said the three new local cases validated yesterday's findings of COVID-19 fragments in the area's wastewater.

Sewage surveillance from the North Richmond and West Camden treatment plants detected virus material and residents were put on high alert.

NSW records 11th day of zero locally acquired coronavirus cases
Key points:
There were 5,385 tests conducted in the last 24 hours
Sewage testing has found virus fragments in south western Sydney and the Hawkesbury
The North Richmond treatment plant detected COVID-19 but there have been no recent confirmed cases in that area
NSW hasD recorded no locally acquired COVID-19 cases for the 11th day in a row.
Health authorities said in the last 24 hours there were 11 cases among returned travellers in hotel quarantine.

There were 5,385 people tested in the reporting period which is a slight increase from Monday's 4,789.

NSW Health has made a direct appeal to anyone living in the Hawkesbury and south western Sydney to come forward for testing if they have even the mildest of symptoms after COVID-19 was detected in local wastewater.

Sewage surveillance system found fragments of COVID-19 in the North Richmond and West Camden treatment plants.

Although there was a positive case in West Camden just last month, no one living in the North Richmond catchment has tested positive to COVID-19 recently.

Acting executive director of Health Protection NSW Richard Broome said finding traces of the virus in sewage samples could mean there were active cases nearby

"[But] it can also mean there are recently recovered cases, as people who have previously been infected can continue to 'shed’ virus fragments into the sewage system for up to four weeks after they have recovered," he said.
Image


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-06/ ... n/12734710

"Our suspicions that the virus is always lurking in the community are founded, and we wouldn't have said that if we didn't mean it," she said.

"We're always going to have cases pop up because we're in a pandemic, but we're also in an economy that is open, where people are undertaking their business, where we don't have [closed] borders but for Victoria."

NSW new cases are also likely to have implications for the country's borders.

The Queensland Government has previously stated it would not open the border with NSW until there was no locally acquired infections for 28 consecutive days.

Ms Berejiklian has warned this is unlikely to happen.

"Until the end of the pandemic, it's highly unlikely that NSW will ever get to 28 days of no community transmission, because that is not how a pandemic works."

Queensland Deputy Premier Steven Miles today said it was too soon to declare whether the 28-day timer would be reset.

"It's too early to say that — there's certainly enough reason to be concerned," Mr Miles said.

Ms Berejiklian said she was pleased to note an immediate uptick in testing across Western Sydney yesterday after the news that COVID-19 had been found in sewage.

Qld border threshold 'unrealistic' as NSW records three local cases
Premier Berejiklian has criticised the Queensland government’s threshold for reopening its borders for being “unrealistic” as New South Wales records three cases of community transmission overnight.

U.S. airlines urge relief as White House signals possible piecemeal aid
South Australia suspends red light camera fines
Sky News Australia logoQld border threshold 'unrealistic' as NSW records three local cases


Video: Frydenberg commits $5.7 billion of Federal Budget to mental health initiatives (Sky News Australia)


Premier Gladys Berejiklian has criticised the Queensland government’s threshold for reopening its borders for being “unrealistic” as New South Wales records three cases of community transmission overnight.

Two of the new infections were reported in south-western Sydney and another in Western Sydney.

Ms Berejiklian said the new cases aligned with traces of the virus health authorities detected in south-west and north-west Sydney sewerage systems.

The state also recorded three new cases in returned overseas travellers in hotel quarantine.

The locally acquired infections could see Queensland extend its border closure to NSW as it breaks the requirement for 28 days of zero community transmission.

“I always said at the outset that the Queensland government’s definition of what would make it safe for them to open their border is always very high and something unrealistic and I think the cases overnight have proven that,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“I say to the Queensland government I appreciate you’ll probably come out today and say the 28 days is ticking again from the start.

“I will put to you that until the end of the pandemic its highly unlikely, highly improbable that NSW will ever get to 28 days of no community transmission because that is not how a pandemic works.”

She flagged NSW would likely always be at risk of new local infections due to the state’s open economy.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/brisbane ... d=msedgdhp
There were no locally acquired COVID-19 cases in the most recent testing period, only three cases among travellers in hotel quarantine.

There were 5,970 tests conducted yesterday.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Public health alerts for seven Sydney locations after new community virus cases
12 days in three locally acquired infections.

NSW Health has issued public health alerts for seven different locations across Sydney after the state today recorded its first new coronavirus cases of community transmission in 12 days in three locally acquired infections.

Two cases in south-west Sydney and one in western Sydney were diagnosed after 8pm yesterday. They are all under urgent investigation.

"People who attended the Fitness First Carlingford Pilates Class on Saturday 3 October from 8.15am to 9.15am are considered close contacts and must immediately get tested and isolate for 14 days since they were there, and stay isolated for the entire period, even if a negative test result is received. NSW Health is directly contacting those who attended," a statement said this afternoon.

https://twitter.com/NSWHealth/status/13 ... 1757971462
Anyone who attended the following venues have also been asked to immediately isolate and be tested as a casual contact.
- Friday, October 2: Kmart, Narellan Town Centre, Narellan – 6pm to 7pm

- Saturday, October 3: Fitness First, Carlingford (all attendees other than those in the pilates class above): 8am to 9.15am

- Sunday, October 4: Penrith Homemaker Centre, Penrith – 11am to 1pm

- Sunday, October 4: Guzman y Gomez, Penrith – 1.30pm to 2pm

- Sunday, October 4: Home Co, Penrith – 2pm to 2.30pm

- Monday, October 5: Westfield Parramatta – 9.30am to 11am

- Monday, October 5: Castle Towers Shopping Centre, Castle Hill – 12pm to 1pm

he three new coronavirus cases today appear to be unconnected.

"There isn't currently a link at all," Premier Gladys Berejiklian said this morning.

The cases are a woman from the Camden local government area (LGA), a man from the Wollondilly LGA and a woman from the Parramatta LGA.

All are aged in their 50s.

"The strong message to the community is especially if you live in those areas, come forward and get tested with the mildest of symptoms," Ms Berejiklian said.

"Our suspicions that the virus is always lurking in the community are founded."

Three more cases in hotel quarantine were diagnosed in NSW yesterday.
Ms Berejiklian said it is a "good wake-up call that we're living in a pandemic".

"It's not a surprise. We did have a good run of ten or eleven days, and my expectation is that will happen again," she said.

"My expectation is we will be able to get on top of those three cases."

Contact tracers are currently going through the contacts of the new cases to try and figure out if they are connected to each other or to previously found clusters.

The new cases have implications for the Queensland border, with the sunshine state setting a 28-day window with zero infections as a condition for opening the border.

"It is a concern when you have a handful of community transmission, but we have to assume from time to time we are going to have this," Ms Berejiklian said.

"It would be highly improbable to get to 28 days without a single case."
Ms Berejiklian said Queensland's target for reopening the border was unrealistic.

"There are always undetected cases," she said.

"They're the risks. We know what they are. And it's a case of managing it."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/p ... d=msedgdhp

HOSPITAL ASSAULT
Elderly woman suffers serious injuries "in fall" at Sydney hospital
An elderly woman with dementia sustained severe injuries during a fall at a Sydney hospital, but her family were not told until five days later.

The woman, known only as Mrs B, was being treated at Hornsby Hospital after suffering dizzy spells and having a fall at home.

The 83-year-old had another fall in hospital, which her family were told about. But a second one saw her knocked unconscious.

Mrs B was then discharged and transferred to a private respite home in a hospital gown and with blood still congealed in her hair.

When her daughter visited she was covered in bruises with two black eyes.

"I was shocked, I couldn't believe the state… couldn't believe it was the same lady," Tracey McCarthy told 9News.

"It was really overwhelming and heartbreaking. She's my mum, no one wants to see your mum like that, she's elderly, and it was her birthday, her 83rd birthday."

Ms McCarthy said she was "livid", no one at the hospital contacted her or her brother, and she "looked like she'd been nine rounds with Mike Tyson".

"She had no family member there to comfort her.. she would have been in a lot of pain, she wouldn't have known what was going on."

A spokesman for Northern Sydney Local Health District offered an "unreserved apology" to the family.

"Hornsby Hospital made contact with the family of this patient last week to provide an unreserved apology and to offer further support," the spokesman said.

"An investigation into the care experienced by this patient while in hospital is underway. The investigation will include a review of the falls, communication with the family and the discharge process.

"Despite several falls prevention strategies being put in place while in hospital, the patient unfortunately suffered two falls.

"Hospital staff are undertaking a review of the processes around the discharge of the patient, and the hospital has also apologised to the family."

<< POLICE ARE NOW REVIEWING HOSPITAL SECURITY RECORDINGS & INVESTIGATING HOW THIS HAPPENED AND EXPECT TO LAY CHARGES .
https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/e ... d=msedgdhp


MONEY HUNGRY DEVELOPERS NOW EYING PUBLIC BEACHES AND WANT TO CHARGE PEOPLE TO ACCESS THESE .
Image
<< THIS MUST NOT BE ALLOWED TO HAPPEN - PERIOD !!!
How part of Bondi Beach could be sold off for a European-style club
A controversial plan to create an exclusive high-end beach club on the sand at Bondi Beach has sparked a furious debate between local residents and organisers.

Amalfi Beach Club has put in a proposal to Waverley Council to erect luxury cabanas roped off from the public over a 40 metre stretch of sand on Australia's most iconic beach.

The proposal from Bondi local Janek Gazecki plans to take over two per cent of the beach near Roscoe Street to serve expensive food and cocktails to 'high net worth' customers.

The elite location will host 100 guests in a European-style beach club set up from Thursdays to Sundays, similar to exotic locations in Spain, Croatia and the Greek Islands.

The plans feature 20 sun lounges, 10 cabanas and four booths being serviced by private waiters.

A two-hour booking in the cabanas costs $80, with food and drinks not included.

There are several issues facing the proposal, including Bondi Beach being an alcohol-free zone and a council policy that does not allow events on the sand during December and January.
<< HOW ABOUT THE BEACH , ALL BEACHES IN AUSTRALIA , ARE OWNED BY THE COMMUNITY AND NEEDS TO REMAIN SO ?
IT'S BAD ENOUGH THAT HARBOR FORESHORES ARE MOSTLY IN PRIVATE HANDS NOW AND FOR ESCLUSIVE USE BY THE OWNERS .


Waverley Council denied a prior proposal in May for the club to run from November to February, but has since received a second application to operate from February to May, which is being reviewed.

Proposal documents seen by the Wentworth Courier show the business plans to exclusively target a wealthy clientele in their demographic.

'Our database constitutes a select demographic comprising of individuals enjoying a high disposable income, within the 25 to 45 age bracket, with an interest in travel, fashion and luxury goods,' the document reads.

Waverley councillor Sally Betts said the exclusive plans block out many Bondi locals.

'I know the beautiful people will love it and the beautiful people do use Bondi Beach but so do the peasants like you and me,' she said.

'We don’t want to take a bit of the beach and say "this is only for the people who can afford it".'

While a petition in favour of the beach club has more than 600 signatures, many locals have come out against the proposal.

A similar club was erected on Adelaide’s Glenelg Beach in 2017, with many supporters of the proposal claiming the set up would be perfect at Bondi.

'This is long overdue in Bondi,' one comment reads.

The plans sparked debate from naysayers over whether businesses should be allowed to privatise public land on the beach.

'To me it seems like you’re taking public beach space which is free and wanting to turn a profit from it,' another post reads.

'While council will consider all event ideas and proposals put before it, we must also balance the needs of the greater community within this consideration,' a Waverley Council spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia.

'Our beaches and parks are public open spaces, for the enjoyment of everyone.'

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/h ... d=msedgdhp

BREACHES
Police fine rule-breaking venues over long weekend
NSW Police has handed out multiple fines to venues across the state over the long weekend for flouting COVID-safe regulations.

On Sunday, two $5,000 fines were given to two separate venues at Cockle Bay Wharf in Darling Harbour.

Police allege the managers were unable to produce a COVID-19 safety plan.

A licensed premise on Keen Street, Lismore, was also fined $5,000 on Saturday for failing to implement a plan.

Another venue on Brighton Street, East Ballina, was fined $5,000 on Sunday for not sticking to the rules or enforcing social distancing.

Police also issued a $1,000 fine to the 31-year-old organiser of a party on the Malabar Headland in south-east Sydney, which was attended by 80 revellers on Sunday.

Elsewhere, two men will face court for attempting to cross into NSW from Victoria three times over two days.

The men, 41 and 52, were fined $1,000 each on Friday for attempting to enter NSW without a valid permit.

On Saturday they were stopped after trying to cross again at checkpoints at 11:00am and later at 9:15pm, and were issued with court attendance notices.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-06/ ... n/12734710
Last edited by kingofnobbys on Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:06 am

7 OCT QLD

QLD RESPONSE TO NEW OUTBREAK OF COMMUNITY TRANSMISSION IN SYDNEY

48 hour deadline to trace COVID-19 cases or risk QLD border shutdown
Image
Health officials in New South Wales have been given a 48 hour countdown to trace three new COVID-19 infections, or risk Queensland pushing back the reopening of its border.

The state announced the new infections, all in Sydney's south and south west, on Wednesday, after enjoying 12 days with no new community cases.

The surprise new cases have dashed hopes that Queensland will reopen its border with NSW as planned on November 1.

Deputy premier Steven Miles has confirmed NSW contact tracers will have just 48 hours to track the source of all three infections to known clusters.

If they fail, Queensland will 'consider' pushing back the opening date, dashing interstate holiday hopes for millions of Australians and ending months of turmoil.

'I don’t want to get ahead of ourselves,' the health minister said on Wednesday.

'The contact tracers in NSW have been doing a really great job. So I hope that they can identify how these are linked to a cluster.

'But if they’re not, then that’s very concerning and so we would need to take that into account.'

The three new people infected with COVID-19 in Sydney visited Kmart, Westfield and Fitness First, sparking fears they may have spread the disease further.

NSW Health are currently contact tracing new cases and issued a public warning on Tuesday, saying people who visited the same locations as the infected people should get tested and isolate.

One of the infected people attended a pilates class at Fitness First in Carlingford from 8.15am to 9.15am on Saturday.

All those who attended the same class are considered close contacts and must immediately get tested and isolate for 14 days from the class.

NSW Health is directly contacting those who attended.

Anyone else who went to Fitness First at the same time but didn't attend the pilates class are still considered casual contacts and should still get tested.

People who attended six other venues in Sydney's west, south west and north west are also considered casual contacts and should be tested.

Another infected person went to Kmart in Narellan in Sydney's south west from 6pm to 7pm on Friday.

Three businesses in Penrith in Sydney's west have also been put on alert.

Those who attended Penrith Homemaker Centre from 11am to 1pm on Sunday should get tested as well as those who went to Guzman y Gomez between 1:30pm and 2pm.

The final Penrith business is Home Co, where shoppers who attended between 2pm and 2:30pm on Sunday should also be tested.

An infected person also went to the popular Westfield in Parramatta in Sydney's west on Monday between 9:30am and 11am.
The last location on alert is Castle Towers Shopping Centre in the city's north west, where an infected person was shopping for an hour from 12pm to 1pm on Monday.

The state health department is 'concerned' that testing numbers have dropped recently and is encouraging increased testing across Sydney.

NSW Health said it is 'especially important for people across West and South West Sydney' to get tested since the new cases are located there.

The state ended its 12-day streak without a locally acquired case as it recorded three locally acquired cases on Wednesday.

There were another three were from overseas travellers in hotel quarantine, bringing the Wednesday's total to six.

Meanwhile, Victoria recorded only six additional cases of COVID-19 overnight and two more deaths from the virus.

The 14-day rolling average in metropolitan Melbourne decreased to 9.9 from 10.6 on Wednesday, while the number of cases with an unknown source fell from 13 to 12.

The Andrews government has set an ambitious target of a rolling two-week average of just five cases a day if lockdown is to be eased by October 19.

Aldi and Coles customers in Melbourne have also been put on high alert after two shoppers and an employee tested positive to COVID-19.

Anyone who was at the Coles store in Williamstown on September 30, between 7pm and 10pm, and the Coles at Westfield Southland in Cheltenham on October 2, between 4.45pm-5.15pm should look out for symptoms.

People who shopped at the Keysborough Aldi between 3.45pm and 4pm on October 1 have also been put on high alert.

AFFECTED VENUES AND TIMES
Friday 2 October: Kmart, Narellan Town Centre, Narellan – 6 pm to 7 pm

Saturday 3 October: Fitness First, Carlingford (all attendees other than those in the pilates class notified above): 8 to 9:15am

Sunday 4 October: Penrith Homemaker Centre, Penrith – 11 am to 1 pm

Sunday 4 October: Guzman y Gomez, Penrith – 1:30 pm to 2 pm

Sunday 4 October: Home Co, Penrith – 2 pm to 2:30 pm

Monday 5 October: Westfield Parramatta – 9:30 am to 11 am

Monday 5 October: Castle Towers Shopping Centre, Castle Hill – 12 pm to 1 pm

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

BORDER ISSUES
Qld premier unhappy with patient treatment
Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says she's not happy with the way the health department treated a man with brain cancer who was denied a request to quarantine at home.

Gary Ralph, 71, had surgery in Sydney last week and arrived back in Queensland with his wife Wendy Child on Tuesday, but he was ordered into hotel quarantine.

The operation has reportedly taken away Mr Ralph's ability to speak or even hold a pen and his NSW doctor has asked Queensland Health to allow him to quarantine at home.

The health department is allowing him to leave the hotel for chemotherapy treatment but he must travel by taxi or ride-share, in the back seat with the windows down, and must wear a mask.

Ms Palaszczuk says Mr Ralph's situation is "very distressing" and she's asked Health Minister Steven Miles to look into his case.

"That's very distressing and can I say I'm not happy with the way Queensland Health has dealt with that at all," she said.

"I spoke with the health minister, the deputy premier this morning. He's going to be speaking with the paramedics and ambulance service about ensuring that transfers can happen. So, look, everyone needs to understand that this is an awful situation that people are going through."

Queensland recorded no new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, with just seven active cases in the state.

Ms Palaszczuk indicated Queensland was still on course to reopen its NSW border if the southern state kept a lid on unlinked community transmission of the virus for another 16 days.

"We have always said that we want to watch very carefully what happens in NSW over the next fortnight as they go on to school holidays," she said.

"That's when people are moving around, as well. And they're not just staying around their homes in their neighbourhood so we're watching that very very carefully."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/brisbane ... d=msedgdhp

7 OCT WA

DOOM AND GLOOM IN WA (PERTH) RENTAL MARKET
Perth property investors pushed to the brink and selling for a loss
The extent of the financial hit property investors are currently taking has been laid bare with new figures showing more than half of Perth units sold this quarter were offloaded at a loss.

Image

New CoreLogic research has also found the Stirling and Perth council areas accounted for 30 per cent of units sold at a loss.

Houses fared better, with 32.2 per cent of sellers taking a loss, but Perth's overall rate of loss-making sales at 36.2 per cent is second only to Darwin, where 52 per cent of sales resulted in the seller receiving less than they paid.

REIWA president Damian Collins said anyone who had bought in Perth in the last six or so years had lost money, with too many people buying at the peak and selling at the bottom of the cycle. He said it was a challenging time for many people.

"You will certainly be seeing people taking in the vicinity of 20 per cent hits," he said. "In some cases it could be higher."

Investors were more likely to get jittery than owner-occupiers and decide to cut their losses and get out of the market.

Mr Collins said because prices had been down for so long, over the next two to three years a high percentage of properties would sell at a loss. But the amount of stock for sale was dropping and prices were starting to move.

"We are an improving market in Perth and we think it'll be 3-5 per cent growth until June next year," he said.

Property analyst Gavin Hegney said the report highlighted the importance of buying the right property if financial gain was the aim.

Too often investors were focused more on the price paid at point of purchase, but if a property was going to drop in value, then it was no bargain.

However the WA market was turning for investors, with lower interest rates and rising rents.

CoreLogic found the outlook for profitability across the Perth market in the second half of 2020 was more positive.

Listings volumes and sales activity were rising across Perth. As well as low mortgage rates and low COVID cases buoying market activity, "WA has seen arguably the most demand-side housing stimulus from the state government on top of federal government schemes," the report said.

This may serve to increase values and increase the amount profitable sales.

REIWA figures showed there were 10,437 properties for sale in Perth at the end of this week; 2 per cent fewer than last week.

There were signs regional mining areas were beginning to rebound, with figures showing a majority of re-sales in WA's northern outback resulted in a profit for the first time since the three months to July 2016.

When looking at major coastal regions across the country, Bunbury had the highest proportion of loss-making sales, with an estimated 158 properties selling for less than the previous sale price.

Bunbury saw more than one-third of properties sold at a loss, reflecting regional WA's long road to recovery following the end of the mining boom, the report said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


7 OCT NT

MASK MANDATE FLAGGED IN NT WHEN INTERSTATE VISITORS ARE ALLOWED IN.

The Northern Territory has been mask-free for months, but that may change as borders open further
The Northern Territory Health Minister says the Government is now pushing for all visitors and residents of the Territory to keep a face mask "handy" as the NT prepares to open its borders to Sydney on Friday.

Health Minister Natasha Fyles said the Government was not trying to "create alarm" but simply instil a level of readiness in the public before the NT accepts visitors from Australia's most populous city.

It comes as the NT passes the milestone of welcoming more than 100,000 people to the region by road and by air since borders to most states were opened in July.

The Territory is also preparing to lift its borders to regional Victoria on November 2, with the region's coronavirus hotspot status being revoked for the first time since it was created in July.

Acting Chief Health Officer Dr Charles Pain said authorities were preparing to issue new advice around wearing masks in the NT.

"As we're going down the downward slope of the epidemic it may seem a bit odd that we're issuing advice about masks," he said.

"But what we want people to do is have a mask, and if they can't keep their physical distance have your mask and just put it on."

"That's what we'd like to start seeing in the community," Dr Pain said.

Dr Pain said the push for everyone to have a mask "gets us ready for the next possible phase of this if there is an outbreak".

Ms Fyles said despite the advice, the Government was not sounding the alarm about the growing potential of a future coronavirus outbreak in the region.

"I guess it's a bit like having a cyclone kit," Ms Fyles said.

"Have a mask handy, so that if someone in your family becomes unwell, you can put that mask on them."

The Territory has gone weeks without a positive case of coronavirus added to its tally.

The streets of Darwin's central business district have been the busiest they have been in months, thanks largely to the region's relaxed coronavirus restrictions and COVID-19-free status.

Long-term NT resident Peter Yates said with the landscape changing as more Australians were allowed to re-enter, he would wear a mask if he "got wind of any local transmission".

"I'd wear a mask if I was out on the street or went to the supermarket or whatever, wherever people would go that might have it," Mr Yates said.

"I think it's a good idea to wear a mask, it's a safe thing, because you don't want to bring it back to your family, to your granddad and grandma."

UK tourist Harriet Buckland, who travelled to the Territory from Melbourne via the quarantine centre in Howard Springs, said she would support any advice to cover up.

"I feel like the numbers are low enough at the moment that I don't think it's necessary, but obviously if they were to climb again it's the best option," Ms Buckland said.

While face mask rules differ across Australia's states and territories, the rules are by far the most stringent in Victoria, where wearing face masks has been mandatory in public since August.

While not mandatory, face masks in NSW are "strongly recommended" in public.

In all other states, they remain non-compulsory.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

7 OCT FEDERAL

TIGHTENING UP MORE ON WHO CAN IMMIGRATE TO AUSTRALIA - BACK TO OLD WAYS
No English, no visa: Australia to block visa for partners if they don't speak English
Australians who fall in love with non-English speaking foreigners will be barred from bringing their partners into the country to be married if they do not speak fluent English.

In Tuesday's federal budget the government said it would introduce an English language test for both the person being sponsored for a visa to move to Australia to marry their partner and their sponsor if they are non-English speaking permanent residents.

"These changes will help support English language acquisition and enhance social cohesion and economic participation outcomes," the budget papers said.

The measure is estimated to save the government $4.9 million over the forward estimates.

Chelsea Sonkar, 30, from Canberra, has applied for a partner visa for her husband Sanjay Sonkar, 30, from Varanasi, India.

She has been raising their one-year-old son alone for the past year while working and studying because Sanjay was caught in India when the borders closed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Mrs Sonkar said the government was sending a clear but ugly message about the type of husband or wife that they deemed suitable for Australians.

"My instinctive reaction was that the government has a preference for the type of spouse that they want to include in the Australian community," she said.

"It sends a very strong message that spouses coming from poorer backgrounds are not welcome."

Mrs Sonkar is confident Mr Sonkar would pass an oral language test because he works as a tourist guide and converses in several languages conversationally. But she is worried that if the test is written he will be at a disadvantage because he dropped out of school when he was 16 to support his family after his father became ill.

"To think that small instance could potentially cost him, he's just doing the best he can and he's a good man," she said.

Mrs Sonkar said the new requirement was in addition to the minimum $8000 visa application fee, the more than two years it takes the department to process partner visas plus the extensive paperwork required to prove that a relationship is genuine.

"I felt angry because now there's another hurdle that we have to jump through when we're doing everything we can," she said.

The changes were criticised by the Opposition's spokesman for multicultural affairs, Andrew Giles.

"English proficiency isn't a test of someone's love," Mr Giles said.

"These changes arrived without any warning, consultation or explanation and take us back to the 1950s.....Why would Australia's government seek to do something like this, instead of keeping partners together?"

Amelia Elliot, who runs an online support and lobbying group for Australians trying to obtain visas for their partners, said the change was "pure discrimination."

"It dictates that we cannot love who we love, and that instead we must marry according to what is dictated by budget policy. This government treats multi-national couples as second-class citizens and it must stop."

Acting Immigration Minister Alan Tudge did not respond to requests for comment.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

AGEISM
Frydenberg defends focused wage subsidy for young Australians (15 - 35 yo UNEMPLOYED ONLY)
The Government outlined in the Budget the JobMaker hiring credit that will be paid for a year to businesses who hire an unemployed worker aged 16 to 35 from the JobSeeker program.

Wage subsidy to employ job seekers aged 16-35
The Government has laid out support measures for tourism operators. Matt Waller is the owner of Adventure Bay Charters in Port Lincoln, South Australia, and he says there are opportunities on the horizon.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

‘A short-term sugar hit’: The National Tertiary Education Union slams the Federal Budget’s university funding
* Universities Australia has supported the $1 billion in funding given to universities under the Federal Budget.
* However, the National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU) said the funding doesn't address the jobs and funding crisis among universities.
* "The extra $1 billion announced for research funding is a short-term ‘sugar’ hit that is here this financial year but gone the next," NTEU National President Dr Alison Barnes said in a statement.
Universities Australia has welcomed the federal government's $1.5 billion in funding for universities, but the National Tertiary Education Union believes more can be done.

Under the Federal Budget announced on Tuesday, universities will be given $1 billion to fund research, as well as $550.3 million for an extra 12,000 university places for students in 2021, another 50,000 short courses and projects for local communities.

Universities Australia Chair, Professor Deborah Terry, said the funding was important for Australia's economic recovery, adding that it will "stabilise university research capacity and jobs".

"The Government clearly understands you can’t have an economic recovery without investing in research and development," she said in a statement.

"This will ensure world-class research and discovery can continue on Australia’s university campuses. That means universities can play their part in the national effort to rebuild the economy."

Terry also praised the funding allocated to university places and short courses.

"This means there are new places for young and older Australians to study and improve their skills right when Australia needs them most," she said.

However, with the coronavirus pandemic hampering the university sector, The National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU) said the Budget doesn't give any relief to universities.

NTEU National President Dr Alison Barnes said in a statement "universities are in the midst of their worst ever crisis" with the Budget giving "scant support" to the sector.

"The extra $1 billion announced for research funding is a short-term ‘sugar’ hit that is here this financial year but gone the next," she said in a statement.

"It will go some way towards reducing the $7.2 billion research funding shortfall as a result of the collapse of international student income, but unfortunately it is only a temporary measure which will not allow universities to give thousands of researchers more permanent jobs.

"This shortfall must be addressed if Australia is to accelerate its economic recovery."

Barnes added that the Budget failed to address the jobs and funding crisis that universities are facing and that "Australia’s universities desperately need a rescue package."

"Livelihoods and careers have been demolished in the past six months with 12,000 jobs lost and $3 billion in revenue disappearing."

And while the union acknowledged the extra 12,000 university places, it raised concerns that it will be "funded at considerably lower rates than existing students."

In June, Universities Australia found that Australian universities could lose $16 billion by 2023 as a result of the pandemic. At the time, Andrew Norton, Professor in the Practice of Higher Education Policy at Australian National University, told Business Insider Australia the main reason for the financial strain was because of the drop in international student numbers.

In July 2019, 143,810 international students arrived in Australia, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. But this year, there were less than 40.

The pandemic has also seen many job cuts across universities, with institutions such as the University of New South Wales, the Australian National University and RMIT University cutting positions.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/careers ... r-BB19M0cM?

SO THE BEST OLDER UNEMPLOYED CAN EXPECT WILL BE 'TRAINING' AS SLAVE LABOUR UNDER "WORK FOR THE DOLE , RETRAINING AND UPSKILLING WILL BE HARD FOR THEM TO SECURE , MEANING MOST WILL NEVER WORK AGAIN REAL JOBS WITH CAREER PATHS .
https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp




WET SEASON APPROACHES AND LA NINA IS HEAR


https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

'River' of tropical weather brings heavy rain and thunderstorms
An ''atmospheric river' of tropical moisture flowing across Australia is causing heavy rain, thunderstorms and damaging winds for several states today.

Over the last couple of days, this thick cloudband has already caused the heaviest October rain in over 120 years of records in parts of South Australia, prompted a flood watch in central Australia, and produced the coldest day in four years at Alice Springs.

The wet and stormy weather will continue today in parts of the Northern Territory, South Australia, NSW, the ACT, Victoria and Tasmania.

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typical Australian wet season , just stronger and more moisture in air this year.

Showers and storms will be heaviest about South Australia and Victoria today with weather warnings in place for both states.

Onshore winds across the Queensland coast is also causing a few showers.

Here's the weather across Australia on Wednesday October 7, 2020.

New South Wales and the ACT
Mostly sunny, cool-to-mild in the northeast. Heavy rain, cool-to-cold in the southeast. Showers, cool-to-mild in the southwest. Late shower, very warm in northwest.

Sydney will be cloudy with a medium chance of rain, most likely this afternoon and evening. Light winds with temperatures between 16C and 21C.

Similar conditions are expected in the ACT with a very high chance of rain an light winds. A cool day is expected with a minimum of 12C and maximum of 18C.

Victoria
Late shower, cool-to-cold in the southwest. Showers, cool-to-cold in the southeast. Rain, cool-to-cold in the north.

Melbourne will be cool and cloudy. Very high chance of rain, most likely during this afternoon and evening. The chance of a thunderstorm later tonight. Light winds becoming E/SE 15 to 20 km/h in the morning then becoming light in the evening. Heading for a low of 11C and a top of 17C.

There is a strong wind warning for Gippsland Lakes, West Coast, Central Coast, Central Gippsland Coast and East Gippsland Coast .

There is a severe weather warning due to heavy rainfall in Mallee, Northern Country, North Central, Wimmera and parts of Central, South West and North East Forecast Districts.

The low pressure system will ill deepen over northernwestern Victoria this evening before tracking south during Thursday, possibly causing flash flooding in some areas.

Queensland
Mostly sunny, mild-to-warm in the southeast. Clearing shower, warm in the northeast. Mostly sunny, very warm in the northwest. Late shower, warm in the southwest.

Brisbane will be partly cloudy. The chance of fog in the west early this morning and a minimum temperature of 16C, maximum of 27C.

Western Australia
Mostly sunny, cool-to-mild in the southwest and south. Windy, cool-to-mild in the northwest. Sunny, very warm in the northeast.

Perth will be partly cloudy with a high chance of showers in the southwest, medium chance elsewhere during the evening. Temperatures will range from 10C to 23C in the city.

There is also a strong wind warning for the Eden Coast.

South Australia
Rain developing, cool in the southeast. Showers, cold in central. Heavy rain, cool-to-cold in the west and north.

Adelaide will be cloudy today with a very high chance of shows minimum of 9C, top of 15C .

There is a strong wind warning for the Spencer Gulf as well as a severe weather warning for Flinders, Mid North, Riverland, Murraylands and North East Pastoral due to heavy rainfall.

A low pressure system will develop near the eastern border of SA on Wednesday and gradually move southeastwards.

Areas of rain will extend across most of South Australia during Wednesday. The heaviest falls are expected across the Flinders district early Wednesday and extending to the remainder of the warning area later on Wednesday.

The rain may lead to flash flooding with six hourly rainfall totals of around 30-50mm possible in some areas.

Thunderstorms are also forecast. Locations which may be affected include Hawker, Port Augusta, Jamestown, Peterborough, Olary and Renmark.

Tasmania
Mostly sunny, mild in the southwest. Fog then sunny, mild in the southeast. Mostly cloudy, cool-to-cold in the northwest. Mostly sunny, cold in the northeast.

Hobart will be partly cloudy. Areas of frost early this morning. Daytime maximum temperatures between 12C and 17C

There is a strong wind warning in place for the Far North West Coast, Central North Coast and East of Flinders Island today.

Warning to Sheep Graziers for King Island, Furneaux Islands, North West Coast, North East, East Coast and South East forecast districts .

Sheep graziers are warned that cold temperatures, heavy rain and strong easterly winds are expected during Wednesday evening and Thursday.

Areas likely to be affected include the Bass Strait Island during Wednesday evening, and King Island, Flinders Island, the North West Coast and East Coast forecast districts and parts of the North East and South East forecast districts during Thursday.

Northern Territory
Partly cloudy in Darwin with a high chance of showers, most likely from the late morning.

A thunderstorm is also likely with temperatures between 25C and 33C today.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Why Australia will see more mosquitoes this summer
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Australians have been warned to expect a possible mosquito explosion brought on by a wet summer.

Conditions could be about to get hotter and wetter in the north of the country after a La Niña formed in the tropical Pacific.

The Bureau of Meteorology said the weather phenomenon which could result in heavy, rainfall, flash flooding and an early start to cyclone season, could last until the end of the year.

The bad news is that these conditions are perfect for mosquitoes, which are likely to thrive in the coming months.

This has sparked fears that there could be an outbreak of mosquito-borne diseases such as the 'potentially fatal' Murray Valley encephalitis virus.

The last time Australia experience a La Niña was in 2010 and 2011, when Queensland was battered by floods.

Cameron Webb, Clinical Associate Professor and Principal Hospital Scientist, University of Sydney, said similar weather patterns has sparked a mosquito population boom in the past.

'Mosquitoes lay their eggs on or around stagnant or still water. This could be water in ponds, backyard plant containers, clogged gutters, floodplains or wetlands,' he wrote for The Conversation.

'Mosquito larvae hatch and spend the next week or so in the water before emerging as adults and buzzing off to look for blood.

'If the water dries up, they die. But the more rain we get, the more opportunities for mosquitoes to multiply.'

Dr Webb said an increase in mosquito numbers is likely to escalate the risk of the diseases they spread, especially the Ross River virus.

Victoria had an outbreak of the Rose River virus in the summer of 2016.

Entomologist Stephen Doggett told Seven News the best way to avoid mosquitoes is to avoid areas prone to them at dawn and dusk.

He also advised it is important to cover up and make sure you wear repellent that contains DEET, picaridin, or eucalyptus.

'Most importantly, read the label and see when you need to reapply it - because there are different reapplication rates for different products and different percentages of the chemical that's inside the repellent,' he said.

People are also advised to close their windows and doors, and use insecticide if found in the home.

What is Ross River and Barmah Forest, Murray Valley encephalitis virus?
The Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses can spread by the bite of certain types of infected female mosquitoes.

Sometimes aspirin or paracetamol are enough to treat the virus but a doctor will advise the best form of treatment.

Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVE) is a flavivirus spread by mosquitoes.

It can cause permanent neurological disease or death and was first found in Australia in Victoria in 1951.

It is very rare for humans to contract MVE.

Diagnosis of the above viruses must be reported to the Department of Health so they can keep track of infected areas.

The viruses can only be diagnosed through a blood test. There are no registered vaccinations to help prevent catching the virus.

Symptoms of the Ross River and Barmah illnesses can include:

Symptoms of MVE include fever, drowsiness, confusion, seizures and vomiting.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

7 OCT NZ

New Zealand eliminates COVID-19 for the second time
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New Zealanders are celebrating after it was declared the deadly coronavirus has been eliminated in the community for a second time.

Health officials on Wednesday announced the end of the 'Auckland Autumn cluster' with the recovery of the last six infected residents and no new cases in ten days.

The fresh cluster, identified in August, brought an unwelcome end to a 102-day run without any cases in New Zealand.

As of midnight on Wednesday, Auckland's restrictions will be brought down to an alert level one - joining the rest of the country.

The changing of restrictions will mean there is no 100-person limit to public gatherings and no distancing rules in bars and restaurants.

Three infections have been recorded within the last 24 hours but these are all in hotel quarantine.

As part of the celebrations the All Blacks will be able to have a full crowd cheer them on when they go head to head with the Wallabies on October 18.

Health Minister Chris Hipkins said Wednesday's news was a major milestone for the country.

'This is a big milestone. New Zealanders have once again through their collective actions squashed the virus,' he said.

'The systems that have been developed and strengthened since our first wave of COVID-19 have worked very effectively to chase down the virus, isolate it, and eliminate it.'

On Monday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said there was a 95 per cent chance the virus is not in the community as the country hasn't recorded a local case since September 24.

'COVID-19 will be with us for many months to come. But we should still mark these milestones,' she said.

Back in April it was declared New Zealand had beaten the virus before a second wave broke out in Auckland in August.

The second wave led to 186 new infections in residents and forced Ms Ardern to place the city back into a strict lockdown.

There are currently 37 people in quarantine with the virus, including one being treated in an Auckland hospital.

New Zealand's pandemic death toll is 25. ( which comes from a population of 10.5M , prorata to USA = 330 x 25 / 10,5 = 78 deaths
That is what a COMPETENT GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO COVID19 LOOKS LIKE , WELL DONE NZ !

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Last virus community case in NZ recovers
New Zealand has a new COVID-19 milestone to celebrate - the recovery of the last people to have caught the virus in the country's second wave.

On Wednesday, health officials announced the effective end of the 'Auckland Autumn cluster' with the return to health of the last six Kiwis to have caught COVID-19 in the community.

The fresh cluster, identified in August, brought to an end a 102-day run without fresh cases in New Zealand.

Kiwis can now start a new streak, as authorities erase all restrictions a second time from Thursday.

Health Minister Chris Hipkins said Wednesday's news was cause for celebration.

"This is a big milestone. New Zealanders have once again through their collective actions squashed the virus," he said.

"The systems that have been developed and strengthened since our first wave of COVID-19 have worked very effectively to chase down the virus, isolate it, and eliminate it."

On Monday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said there was a 95 per cent chance the virus is not in the community. NZ hasn't reported a local case since September 24.

However, it isn't totally gone from New Zealand.

Health officials are still finding cases within the country's border regime, identifying three on Wednesday from Kiwis returning home, all within managed isolation.

There are 37 people in quarantine with the virus, including one being treated in an Auckland hospital.

New Zealand's pandemic death toll is 25.



https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/la ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Oct 07, 2020 8:56 am

7 OCTOBER DATA

NSW'S LUCKY STREAK RUNS OUT , THERE IS NEW COMMUNITY TRANSMISSION IN SYDNEY.
In Campbelltown, Parramatta and Wollondilly

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CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12567
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:15 am

8 OCT VIC

Victoria records 11 new coronavirus cases and no deaths, Melbourne 14-day average falls
Victorian Deputy Chief Health Officer Allen Cheng says officials are concerned about an increase in coronavirus infections without a known source, as more cases are linked to a small cluster in the regional town of Kilmore.

Under the state's roadmap, Melbourne is set to move to the third step when the statewide 14-day average falls below five, and the two-week total of mystery cases is also below five.

But with two more mystery cases added to that total today, Professor Cheng said it would be a "day-by-day assessment of the situation" as to when further restrictions are lifted.

Victoria reported 11 new cases of coronavirus today, but no deaths with COVID-19.

Melbourne's 14-day rolling case average is now 9.7, down from 9.9 yesterday.

But the city's two-week total of infections with an unknown source has grown from 12 to 14 since yesterday.

The number reflects the total number of mystery cases recorded between September 22 and October 5.

The two-week reporting period for mystery cases runs two days behind that of the 14-day average, to allow time for public health officials to investigate if the source of an infection is not immediately clear.

#EMBEDvicpostcodemap

Professor Cheng said eight of Melbourne's mystery cases were recorded between September 22 and 24, so would drop out of the reporting window in coming days.

But there were six recorded between September 30 and October 4, which Professor Cheng said was concerning.

"Every unknown source case represents at least one person who gave it to them — so we still are concerned about that," he said.

"That's, I think, the figure that concerns me most at this stage.

"We still have a little way to go, so we just need to keep an eye on those and continue to investigate those to see where they might have got it from."

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Last month, Premier Daniel Andrews said he expected Melbourne to be able to take that step on October 19, a week earlier than originally expected.

Discussion of roadmap dates has always come with caveats, but until recent days officials had seemed optimistic that targets would be met by October 19.

Today Mr Andrews said: "I think it is highly unlikely that nothing will change [on October 19]."

"There will be some changes, the exact nature of those changes we will need to look at," he said.

The two new confirmed mystery cases were recorded in the Dandenong and Altona North local government areas, Professor Cheng said.

In regional Victoria, the two-week total of mystery cases remains at zero.

Authorities battling Chadstone and Kilmore outbreaks
The increase in mystery cases comes as authorities try to tackle a growing outbreak connected to a butcher in Melbourne's Chadstone shopping centre.
Chadstone cluster spreads to regional Victoria
More than 170 residents in the regional Victorian town of Kilmore are self-isolating after being tested in a COVID-19 blitz to detect any trace of the virus following two positive diagnoses.

Two cases in the small town were linked to the Chadstone outbreak, believed to have been spread to the regional area through a Melbourne resident travelling for work and who ate at a Kilmore café.
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Anyone who attended the Old Fellows café between Wednesday and Saturday last week was urged to come forward for testing regardless of any symptoms.

Health authorities were desperate to bring the virus under control as the regional cases threaten Victoria’s progress out of lockdown.

The Chadstone cluster was linked to 31 infections to date.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp

Health officials are also focusing on a cluster in the regional town of Kilmore, about 60 kilometres north of Melbourne.

The Kilmore cluster began when a person with COVID-19 linked to the Chadstone outbreak dined at the town's Oddfellows Cafe while infectious.

A total of 31 coronavirus infections have been linked to the Chadstone Butcher Club cluster since it emerged last Wednesday.

No new cases were linked to the outbreak today, Professor Cheng said.

But a new case in Kilmore brings the official total in that cluster to four, including the case who brought the virus to the area.

Professor Cheng said a possible fifth case was still being investigated.

The Kilmore case linked to the Oddfellows cafe was one of two positive tests recorded in regional Victoria.

The other was detected in the Mildura local government area in Victoria's north-west, but Mr Andrews said it could be a false positive.

Victoria has also widened the net in its contact tracing approach in Kilmore to try to stop a small outbreak in the regional town spreading even further.

Regional Victoria's 14-day rolling case average has increased to 0.4, from 0.3 yesterday.

Of 15,298 coronavirus tests processed overnight, 2,360 were done in regional Victoria, Mr Andrews said.

The Premier flagged the further easing of restrictions in regional Victoria if case numbers remain high in Melbourne, but said any changes would be minor.

Box Hill Hospital and family outbreaks grow
Three of the new infections are linked to a cluster in Melbourne's outer south-east known as the Frankston family outbreak, one is linked to a "complex case" and one is linked to the Box Hill Hospital.

5 cases are still under investigation.

An outbreak at Box Hill Hospital is now linked to 2 staff members and 1 patient.

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) said deep cleaning, testing and quarantining was underway at the hospital.

The Frankston family outbreak, now connected to 6 active cases and 11 overall, has also been linked to the Chadstone cluster.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Pandemic fatigue sets in as health experts warn Government needs to find balance in health messaging
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Businesses in regional cities like Mildura are still yet to fully reopen.
Experts say it might be time to rethink messages encouraging country Victorians to remain COVID-safe as testing rates drop in remote areas where pandemic fatigue is setting in.

The Victorian Government's head of testing recently expressed concern about the number of people coming forward to be tested in "outer regional Victoria", where the Government is now looking at wastewater for samples of the virus.

"We've had an amazing response from our community towards getting tested as soon as they've had any symptoms, no matter how mild, but we have noticed -- and this is the same across regional Victoria — that our testing numbers have really dropped in the last sort of four to five weeks," said Shelley Faulks, director of clinical programs at Sunraysia Community Health Services in Victoria's north-west.

Mildura has only recorded six confirmed cases of COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic and civic, political and business leaders have long campaigned for restrictions to be eased in the region.

Julie Leask, a public health and risk communication expert at the University of Sydney, said the mandating of masks and limitations on movement were onerous but reasonable measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to regional areas.

However, she said people could become fatigued and confused, particularly when local community leaders appeared at odds with official government health advice.

Finding a balance 'tricky'
Frustration with ongoing restrictions has continued in regional Victoria even after it took a third step towards reopening last month.

In the north-west, some are also arguing for a relaxation of the mandatory mask-wearing in the summer heat, and others have questioned the practicality of rules about cross-border travel.

A Mildura newspaper's editorial at the weekend also criticised the "madness" of "city-centric policymaking" that it said had crippled businesses in COVID-free regions for months.

Professor Leask said Victoria should consider following NSW's example by decentralising its public health model, so messaging was tailored for local communities instead of coming from Melbourne.

"It is a tricky one because you want local leaders to be representing the voice of the local community and the local issues, and that's an important part of democracy," she said.

"But at the same time, you don't want to see the pretty tight, but reasonable, measures that are in place undermined too heavily, because people can become conflicted and confused.

"You just have room for a lot more conflict at a time when we don't need it because there's enough anxiety and distress from the impacts of COVID on all of our lives to then have to cope with divisive voices at a leadership level.

"Equally, if governments don't communicate well and give a strong rationale and have that two-way communication around why they're doing what they're doing and how they've considered the issues of this particular local community or remote regional Victoria in their decision-making, then you do have much more of an environment that's ripe for dissenting voices to become louder voices."

Authoritarian approach 'won't work'
In Mildura, news the Government would begin testing wastewater in the city for virus samples was met with a degree of backlash on social media.

Many expressed fears it was part of a plan to justify ongoing restrictions in the regions, despite the head of testing, Jeroen Weimar, to be lifted further.

Paul Delfabbro from the University of Adelaide's School of Psychology has been researching some emerging conspiracies linked to the pandemic and the types of people prone to believing them.

He is concerned Victoria's strategy for dealing with COVID-19 has become too authoritarian, saying it "won't work long-term" and could have ramifications for people's faith in what governments are saying.

"People are much more likely to respond to rewards, and where there's a shared ownership of the change in behaviour," Professor Delfabbro said.

"People only change their behaviour when they believe in the message."

He said if people felt there was an "over surveillance" of their lives, they "may start to resent that sort of intrusion and then gravitate towards a source of information that tends to prey on that type of concern".

In a statement, Victoria's Department of Health and Human Services said it was working closely with partner agencies, including local health units, to "understand the challenges at a grassroots level and ensure important information campaigns are targeted and relevant to all communities".

At Sunraysia Community Health Services, Ms Faulks was hopeful a drop in testing rates could be attributed at least in part to less illness in the community.

"I know our community probably is getting a bit fatigued with it all, as is all of Victoria, but it is so, so important that we continue to get tested if we have symptoms, no matter how mild," she said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

BREACHES
Anti-masker SPITS at cops after being asked to wear mask in Melbourne
A woman who refused to wear a mask spat at police when they urged her to comply with health orders and put on a face covering.

The woman was seen walking her dog in the Bayside area, in Melbourne's southern suburbs, on Wednesday.

She was not wearing a mask at the time.

Officers approached the woman and she became abusive towards them.

Police said in a statement that the woman spat at the officers' feet as they approached.

She refused to go home and get her mask and was fined.

Victoria Police issued 69 fines to people breaching Chief Health Officer's orders.

Around 23 of these fines were issued for not wearing a face mask when outside of the home.

Fines were also issued to a group of young people who gathered in a laneway in Dandenong.

The group tried to run away from police, but officers found four members of the group who were all more than 5km from their home.

Another man in a ride share delivery car was stopped at a checkpoint by police.

He said he was picking up takeaway food but was fined because he was more than 5km from his home.

Six other people were fined at vehicle checkpoints.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Thu Oct 08, 2020 6:13 am

8 OCT NSW

NSW records 12 new cases of coronavirus - including 8 in the community
Image
New South Wales has recorded 12 new cases of coronavirus, including eight in the community, topping Victoria's new infections for the first time in months.

Five of the latest cases have already been traced, while three others remain under investigation.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian on Thursday confirmed the three cases which remain under investigation are linked to one source, and she hopes there will be further updates throughout the day.

There are two clusters under investigation, including one linked back to the previous Liverpool Hospital cluster in Sydney's south west.

Four new cases are close contacts of an employee at the hospital.

Another new case, which was first reported on Wednesday afternoon but was not considered in the official daily tally until Thursday, is under investigation.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/n ... r-BB19NXmn

NSW records 8 locally acquired coronavirus cases, clusters expected to grow.

SW Health has not yet ruled out the possibility that all eight new cases are in fact linked.

A further four cases were diagnosed in returned travellers already completing mandatory hotel quarantine.

Ms Berejiklian warned there are likely more cases of COVID-19 circulating in the community.

'I am... expecting the number of community transmissions to increase, given those three cases yesterday,' she told ABC TV on Thursday.

'But that's what we expect in a pandemic. If you're keeping your borders open, if you have an open economy, you're keeping jobs going, you're making sure the community is supported as much as possible, whilst you're controlling the virus, you're going to have cases pop up now and then.

'And that's why I've always argued that it's better to have a resilient system, one with open borders, rather than have these artificial rules about when it's safe to open a border or not. I don't think that works, I don't think it's fair.'

Earlier she chided her counterparts in Queensland and Western Australia for their 'blinkered views' and unyielding border restrictions.

The streak of 12 consecutive days without a single case of community transmission of COVID-19 ended on Wednesday, threatening the prospect of the Queensland border re-opening on November 1.

Urgent alert for more Sydney venues linked to coronavirus cases
An alert has been issued for a number of additional Sydney venues linked to new coronavirus cases, including a pool at Macquarie University.

NSW Health released the list after eight cases of community transmission were recorded in the state in the last 24 hours.

The total number of cases was 12, with four returned travellers in hotel quarantine.

The latest venues are:
Surf Dive 'n' Ski at Castle Towers Shopping Centre Castle Hill - October 5, 12.00pm to 5.00pm
Chemist Warehouse on the corner of Bridge and Rawson Streets, Epping – October 6, 10.30am-11am
Macquarie University Sports and Aquatic Centre outdoor pool area at North Ryde – October 7, 5.30am-10.30am
Anyone who attended the venues is considered a casual contact and must monitor for symptoms and get tested immediately if they develop.

After testing, they must remain in isolation until a negative test result is received.

Earlier today, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said seven of the eight local cases have already been linked to a known cluster and health authorities are working to identify the other case.

"Do not take this lightly, we need to get on top of this," Ms Berejiklian said.
One of the new cases attended Sydney's Macquarie University.

There are also four cases in hotel quarantine, taking today's total number of cases to 12.

Victoria recorded 11 cases of COVID-19 today.

Two clusters under investigation
There are two clusters currently under investigation in the state.

The first is linked to the Liverpool Hospital dialysis cluster.

One case is a female healthcare worker in her 30s who hosted a social event.

She did not have any symptoms, Chief Health Officer Dr Kerry Chant said today.

READ MORE: Two new locations added to NSW alert list

Two people at the social event – another woman in her 30s and a woman in her 50s – subsequently tested positive to the virus.

A man in his 80s and a woman in her 60s, who are household contacts of the healthcare worker, also tested positive, taking the cluster to five.

"The way we think it unfolded was that there was a healthcare worker, who did not have symptoms, who works at Liverpool Hospital," Dr Chant said.

"Who hosted an event at their home, and there were two subsequent people who attended that event who became infected.

"And then that person also led to infection in that person's household."

READ MORE: Scott Morrison keeps up pressure on premiers over hard borders

The second cluster was first reported yesterday when it was revealed there were three mystery cases.

Two of these cases are a man in his 50s, and a woman also in her 50s.

Contact tracing has determined that a household contact of the man in his 50s works with the woman in her 50s from the Liverpool cluster, Dr Chant said.

They are both healthcare workers at a private clinic in Liverpool.

One case is still under investigation.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/c ... d=msedgdhp



The Queensland government has given New South Wales 48 hours to find the source of the three new unknown cases which were detected.

If there is no clear link found, the countdown to borders reopening will start again as the Sunshine State insists on 28 days without a single case of community transmission.

Ms Berejiklian said she was blindsided by the 48-hour deadline imposed by Queensland to trace the source of the latest COVID cases after hearing it on the news.

'I don't know where they got that from. Does it matter how long it takes our experts to find the links?'

She also indicated that the border with regional Victoria would not reopen any time soon.
Key points:
Dozens of diners at a Sydney restaurant have been ordered to get a test and isolate
The restaurant says staff instructed guests to sign in but didn't make sure they had
NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian says she "has no patience" for venues that break COVID-19 rules

Health authorities in NSW have confirmed five new locally acquired coronavirus cases, as contact tracers focus their efforts on two infection clusters the Premier says are likely to keep growing.

The five new cases are on top of three that had been previously announced, meaning there have been a total of eight locally acquired infections in the 24 hours to 8.00pm yesterday.

The swathe of new cases have signalled a resurgence of the virus in Australia's most populous state, which had gone 12 days without recording a positive swab outside hotel quarantine.

NSW's eight new cases have been divided into two clusters, chief health officer Kerry Chant said.

One, which includes five of the new infections, can be traced to the Liverpool Hospital cluster.

The source of the second cluster, which includes the other three cases, is under investigation.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said she was expecting to see more cases in the coming days.
"We anticipate that because we've identified these eight cases that a number of close contacts and family members could be found to be positive," she said.

The numbers could already be expanding — shortly before the Premier's 11.00am coronavirus briefing, Macquarie University's vice chancellor Bruce Dowton confirmed a student had tested positive.

"We have robust plans and processes in place to manage situations like this one, and students and staff can have confidence to continue to come to campus," he wrote in an email.

The student recently visited the sports and aquatic centre on campus which has now been closed for cleaning.

NSW Health confirmed the case at Macquarie University would be included in tomorrow's numbers.SW Health tonight issued an alert to the public over Monopole Restaurant in Potts Point, after a confirmed case visited there on October 4, for two hours from 6:00pm.

Anyone at the restaurant that evening is being asked to monitor for symptoms and get tested immediately if they develop.

Health authorities are also advising that people who travelled on several train and bus services around Sydney and Moss Vale on October 4, 5, 6, and 7 are considered casual contacts.

NSW Health also issued public health alerts earlier today for three venues visited by new cases.
Image

Five of the new locally acquired infections are all linked to the Liverpool Hospital cluster, in Sydney's south-west.

An asymptomatic healthcare worker hosted a small social gathering at their home, subsequently infecting four people.

In the 24 hours to 8.00pm yesterday there were a further four COVID-19 cases among returned travellers in hotel quarantine.

There were 12,498 tests conducted in the reporting period.

Premier running out of patience as dozens of diners told to isolate
NSW Health has issued an alert for anyone who attended Ripples restaurant in Milsons Point on Saturday, October 3 between 8:00pm and 10:30pm after one of the new cases attended the venue.

It claimed the restaurant failed to take the details of "a small number" of diners during that period, and that contact tracers were relying on public call outs to reach all people who were now considered close contacts, who should get tested and isolate immediately.

Ms Berejiklian said she had "no patience" for businesses that broke the state's social-distancing rules.

"It makes the job of our contact tracers that much more difficult if businesses aren't doing the right thing," she said.

"I have no patience anymore for people, and businesses in particular, that aren't doing the right thing.

"We've been extremely patient and tolerant to bring everybody on board but we can't have a few people let down the whole community."

The restaurant has reopened after being cleaned and diners could be seen having their temperatures checked upon entering the venue today.

In a statement, a spokeswoman for Sydney Restaurant Group, which operates Ripples, described the incident as "very unfortunate" and said the two tables in question had been instructed to sign for contact-tracing purposes by using a QR code.

Urgent alert issued for iconic Sydney Harbor restaurant
Image
Sydney's renowned Ripples restaurant, which boasts views of the Harbour Bridge, has been put on alert after a coronavirus-infected person dined there.

The infected customer went to the upmarket venue in Milson's Point on Saturday October 3.

An urgent alert has been issued by NSW Health warning guests who dined at the restaurant between 8pm and 10.30pm to get tested and isolate for 14 days.

Officials instructed patrons to 'stay isolated for the entire period, even if a negative test result is received'.

Image
Sydney's renowned Ripples restaurant (pictured), which boasts views of the Harbour Bridge, has been put on alert after a coronavirus-infected person dined there
Image
The infected customer went to the upmarket venue (pictured) in Milson's Point on Saturday October 3

The infection is just one of three new cases reported on Wednesday following a 12-day stint with no community transmission.

The surprise new cases have dashed hopes that Queensland will reopen its border with NSW as planned on November 1.

Deputy premier Steven Miles has confirmed NSW contact tracers will have just 48 hours to track the source of all three infections to known clusters.

NSW Health have traced one new case to Fitness First in Carlingford where an infected person went to a class from 8.15am to 9.15am on Saturday.

All those who attended the pilates class are considered close contacts and must immediately get tested and isolate for 14 days from the day of the class.

Anyone else who went to Fitness First at the same time but didn't attend the Pilates class are still considered casual contacts and should still get tested.

Another infected person went to Kmart in Narellan in Sydney's south west from 6pm to 7pm on Friday.

Three businesses in Penrith in Sydney's west have also been put on alert.

Those who attended Penrith Homemaker Centre from 11am to 1pm on Sunday should get tested as well as those who went to Guzman y Gomez between 1:30pm and 2pm.

The final Penrith business is Home Co, where shoppers who visited between 2pm and 2:30pm on Sunday should be tested

An infected person also went to the popular Westfield in Parramatta in Sydney's west on Monday between 9:30am and 11am.

The last location on alert is Castle Towers Shopping Centre in the city's north west, where an infected person shopped for an hour from 12pm to 1pm on Monday.

The state health department is 'concerned' that testing numbers have dropped and is encouraging increased testing across Sydney.

NSW Health said it is 'especially important for people across West and South West Sydney' to get tested since the new cases are located there.

The state ended its 12-day streak without a locally acquired case as it recorded three locally acquired cases on Wednesday.

There were another three were from overseas travellers in hotel quarantine, bringing the Wednesday's total to six.

AFFECTED VENUES AND TIMES
Friday 2 October: Kmart, Narellan Town Centre, Narellan – 6pm to 7pm

Saturday 3 October: Fitness First, Carlingford (all attendees other than those in the pilates class notified above): 8 to 9:15am

Saturday 3 October: Ripples restaurant, Milson's Point - 8pm to 10.30pm

Sunday 4 October: Penrith Homemaker Centre, Penrith – 11am to 1pm

Sunday 4 October: Guzman y Gomez, Penrith – 1:30pm to 2pm

Sunday 4 October: Home Co, Penrith – 2 pm to 2:30 pm

Monday 5 October: Westfield Parramatta – 9:30am to 11am

Monday 5 October: Castle Towers Shopping Centre, Castle Hill – 12pm to 1pm

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

"Sadly, this was a case of our staff not insisting on viewing evidence that these two tables had signed in via the QR codes placed on their menus," the spokeswoman said.

She said Sydney Restaurant Group was "very confident" its 12 venues were compliant with NSW's social-distancing guidelines, and said the two tables had been tracked down using their credit card details.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-08/ ... s/12742556

Get tested for coronavirus if you have been to these NSW venues
Immediately self-isolate and get tested
If you have been to the below locations, you must immediately self-isolate and get a coronavirus test. You must remain in quarantine for the full two weeks even if the test returns a negative result.

Carlingford, Fitness First: 8am to 9:15am on Saturday 3 October. (Anyone who attended the pilates class from 8:15 am to 9:15am is considered a close contact and must immediately get tested and self isolate for 14 days since they were there, and stay isolated for the entire period, even if a negative test result is received. NSW Health is directly contacting those who attended. Anyone who attended Fitness First Carlingford from 8am to 9:15am, other than those in the pilates class, is considered a casual contact and should watch for COVID-19 symptoms and if symptoms occur, immediately get tested and self-isolate.)
Milson's Point, Ripples restaurant: 8pm to 10.30pm on Saturday 3 October. See the public health alert.
Monitor for symptoms
Artarmon: Artarmon Mazda service centre, Campbell Street: 7.30am-9.30am on Friday 2 October
Castle Hill: Castle Towers Shopping Centre: 12pm-1pm on Monday 5 October
Jamisontown: Penrith Homemaker Centre: 11am-1pm on Sunday 4 October
Narellan: Kmart, Narellan Town Centre: 6pm-7pm on Friday 2 October
Parramatta: Westfield Parramatta: 9:30am-11am on Monday 5 October
Penrith: Guzman y Gomez: 1:30pm to 2pm on Sunday 4 October
Penrith: Home Co: 2pm to 2:30pm on Sunday 4 October


https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW contact tracers desperate to uncover source of mystery cases
New South Wales contact tracers are urgently working to link three mystery cases reported on Wednesday to a known outbreak to prevent further extending Queensland’s border reopening.

Authorities were given until Friday night to find the source of the locally acquired infections or Queensland’s 28-day border clock will reset, according to Queensland’s deputy premier.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the border criteria was unrealistic and it would be very unlikely for the state to go 28 days without a new infection in the midst of a global pandemic.

Health authorities revealed the three mystery cases came from Western Sydney following 12 days of zero community transmission.

Ms Berejiklian said the cases confirmed her suspicions the virus was secretly transmitting through Western Sydney following concerns over dropping testing numbers.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/ns ... d=msedgdhp

Gladys Berejiklian ADMITS community transmission are likely to rise
Premier Gladys Berejiklian is warning there are likely more cases of COVID-19 circulating in the NSW community.

'I am ...expecting the number of community transmissions to increase, given those three cases yesterday,' she told ABC TV on Thursday.

'But that's what we expect in a pandemic. If you're keeping your borders open, if you have an open economy, you're keeping jobs going, you're making sure the community is supported as much as possible, whilst you're controlling the virus, you're going to have cases pop up now and then,' she said.

'And that's why I've always argued that it's better to have a resilient system, one with open borders, rather than have these artificial rules about when it's safe to open a border or not. I don't think that works, I don't think it's fair.'

Earlier she chided her counterparts in Queensland and Western Australia for their 'blinkered views' and unyielding border restrictions.

The NSW streak of 12 consecutive days without a single case of community transmission of COVID-19 ended on Wednesday, threatening the prospect of the Queensland border re-opening on November 1.

COVID-19 alert for Milsons Point restaurant, breast screening declines dramatically
Alert for Milsons Point restaurant
NSW Health has issued an alert for Ripples Restaurant in Sydney's Milsons Point after person with COVID-19 attended the venue last weekend.

Anyone who was at the restaurant on Saturday October 3 between 8:00pm and 10:30pm is considered a close contact, and must get tested and isolate for the 14 days since the visit.

A small number of walk-in diners did not have their details recorded and cannot be contacted directly by NSW Health.

Anyone who went to the Mazda Artarmon repair centre on Campbell Street between 7:30am and 9:30am on Friday October 2 is considered a casual contact and should get tested and isolate if they develop even the slightest symptoms.

Sharp decline in breast screening
New data shows there were 50,000 fewer breast screenings in NSW in the first half of this year compared to the last reporting period due to COVID-19 restrictions.

The number of women who were screened with Breast Screen NSW fell from 150,000 in January to June 2018 to just over 100,000 in the same period this year.

New data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows the national statistics were much more stark.

In April 2018, more than 74,000 screening mammograms were carried out across Australia but that number fell to 1,100 this April.

Screening has bounced back, but in June this year there were still 10,000 fewer tests carried out compared to June 2018.

New COVID-19 cases play havoc with holiday plans
Three new mystery coronavirus cases have thrown interstate travel and potential border reopenings into disarray.

The clock could be reset on plans announced last week to reopen the border with Queensland on November 1, and Western Australia's hard border policy is still not budging.

However the Northern Territory still looks set to reopen its doors to Sydneysiders this Friday and Tasmania plans to reopen its borders to low-risk COVID states from the end of October.

South Australia has already deemed NSW a "low transmission zone", meaning travellers are able to enter the state without having to quarantine as long as they haven't been in Victoria in the previous 14 days.

William Tyrell inquest wraps up
The inquest into the disappearance of William Tyrrell from the NSW mid-north coast will wrap up evidence later today.

It has been six years since the three-year-old vanished from Kendall and no one has ever been arrested or charged.

The inquest into the boy's suspected murder will hear statements from his foster and biological families before finalising almost two years of hearings.

Detective Chief Inspector David Laidlaw told the court yesterday the team working to find out what happened to the boy has been reduced from 26 to just five investigators.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

'We can't support those who aren't doing the right thing': Berejiklian
Premier Gladys Berejiklian has urged New South Wales residents to only support those businesses and venues that have an active COVID safe plan in place as the level of community transmission rises.

The advice comes as NSW recorded eight new locally acquired cases of the virus in the last 24 hour reporting period, only five of which had been linked to an existing cluster.

Ms Berejiklian said the three remaining mystery cases were all linked and contact tracers were working to uncover the source of the infections.

“I have no patience anymore for people, businesses in particular, who aren’t doing the right thing,” she said.

“We’ve been extremely patient and tolerant to bring everybody on board, but we can’t have a few people let down the whole community.

“I ask the public to please support those businesses you know are COVID safe.

“We can’t support those that aren’t doing the right thing.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/we ... d=msedgdhp

NSW authorities call for more testing as state records local infections
rofessor Sanjaya Senanayake, an infectious diseases specialist at the Australian National University, says the source of 'mystery cases' is often found within a couple of days.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW Covid hotspots: list of Sydney and regional case locations
ist of case locations in NSW
If you have visited the following locations then you are considered a close contact and must immediately get tested and isolate for 14 days since you were there, and stay isolated for the entire period, even if a negative test result is received.

Fitness First Carlingford Pilates Class, Carlingford: Saturday 3 October, 8.15am to 9.15am
Ripples restaurant, Milsons Point: Saturday 3 October, 8pm to 10.30pm
NSW Health is assessing potential exposure to Covid-19 of people who attended several other venues. Anyone who attended the following venues is considered casual contacts and should immediately isolate and get tested even if they develop the slightest symptoms of Covid-19.

Artarmon Mazda service centre, Campbell Street, Artarmon: Friday 2 October, 7.30am to 9.30am
Kmart, Narellan Town Centre, Narellan: Friday 2 October, 6pm to 7pm
Penrith Homemaker Centre, Penrith: Sunday 4 October, 11am to 1pm
Guzman y Gomez, Penrith: Sunday 4 October:, 1:30pm to 2pm
Home Co, Penrith: Sunday 4 October, 2pm to 2:30pm
Westfield Parramatta: Monday 5 October, 9:30am to 11am
Castle Towers Shopping Centre, Castle Hill: Monday 5 October, 12pm to 1pm
If you live in or have visited these local government areas in the past two weeks, get tested if you have any Covid-19 symptoms, even if mild, and self-isolate until you get your test result.

Campbelltown
Liverpool LGA
Parramatta LGA
A known case travelled on a train on Saturday 3 October that left Parramatta station at 7.13pm and arrived at Milsons Point station at 8.04pm. Anyone who caught the train at this time is considered a casual contact and must monitor for symptoms and get tested immediately if they develop.

There is an alert for passengers and crew on a Jetstar Flight JQ510 flight from Melbourne at 11am on 27 September to Sydney. However, NSW Health say there is no ongoing risk of infection to the general public, and the majority of passengers on the flight are already undertaking mandatory hotel quarantine.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

MORE Sydney coronavirus infections will be announced tomorrow
NEW CORONAVIRUS ALERTS IN SYDNEY
Surf Dive 'n' Ski at Castle Towers Shopping Centre in Castle Hill on October 5 from midday to 5pm

Chemist Warehouse in Epping on October 6 from 10.30am to 11am

Macquarie University Sports and Aquatic Centre in North Ryde on October 7 from 5.30am to 10.30am


Anyone who visited those locations between those is advised to monitor for symptoms and get tested if they occur.

The university's Sports and Aquatic Centre and a Faculty of Arts building were closed on Thursday for deep cleaning, but are expected to reopen on Friday.

Anyone at the university pool between 5.30am and 10.30am on October 7 must be tested for the virus and isolate until they receive a negative result.

'Following guidance from the authorities, contact tracing measures are now underway and anyone who may have come into contact with the student will be informed to self-isolate and get tested,' the spokesperson said.

'NSW Health is alerting the public to the following locations visited by new cases of COVID-19 notified today. These cases will be included in tomorrow's numbers and contact tracing is underway,' a tweet read.

NSW on Thursday recorded more cases than COVID-19 hot spot Victoria, which saw just 11 new infections, for the first time in months.

Chief Health Officer Kerry Chant said the eight new cases were from two separate clusters that were being investigated.

Five are linked to the Liverpool Hospital dialysis cluster - one healthcare worker in her 30s, two women who visited her, and two household contacts aged in their 60s and 80s.

'The way we think it unfolded was that there was a healthcare worker, who did not have symptoms, who works at Liverpool Hospital,' Dr Chant said.

The source of the second cluster - the three linked cases revealed on Wednesday - is still under investigation.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW TO SUPPORT JOBLESS RETRAINING UPSKILLING
Premier Palaszczuk flags investment in TAFE and skills development
Investment in TAFE institutions across the state has been flagged by Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk as a key part of the Labor government’s election campaign.

“One of our key priorities in our economic recovery plan is about looking and investing in skills,” she said.

“Skills are important.

“It is absolutely crucial as we progress our economic recovery that we look at the skills that are needed for the jobs in the region and matching those skills with those potential jobs.

“I want to ensure that young people across our state have the opportunity to pursue their dreams and get the jobs they want to get into.

“Over the last five years we’ve invested over $150 million and today I’m announcing that over the next three years my government would inves

t $100 million upgrading our TAFE's across Queensland to ensure they match with those skills."

The Premier also flagged additional investment in a new hydrogen and renewable energy training hub.

“Hydrogen is a huge opportunity for us to capitalize on a growth industry that will be worth billions of dollars."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/pr ... d=msedgdhp


NSW - QLD BORDER ISSUES

The Queensland government has given NSW 48 hours to find the source of the three new cases detected in NSW otherwise the countdown clock will re-start, as Queensland insists NSW must go 28 days without a single community case.

WA has applied the same 28-day benchmark and there's speculation it could keep its border closed until April.

Ms Berejiklian is furious, saying 'unrealistic expectations like that are not fair ... and it's just not the right thing to do'.

'I think it's a benchmark no state our size would ever be able to meet,' she said.

Ms Berejiklian said she was blindsided by the 48-hour deadline imposed by Queensland to trace the source of the latest COVID cases after hearing it on the news.

'I don't know where they got that from. Does it matter how long it takes our experts to find the links?'

WA and Queensland's closed borders perpetuated a false sense of security, she said.

She reminded WA Premier Mark McGowan and Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk that GST raised in NSW subsidised their states.

'I won't complain about that. What I will complain about ... is the attitude of the premiers,' she said.

'I don't think it's acceptable. I respect them as individuals, I respect them as people ... but I think just to have this blinkered view that you're not part of a nation, you're not part of Australia is a dangerous one,' she said.

Meanwhile anyone who dined at the five-star Ripples restaurant at Milsons Point, adjacent to Luna Park, on Saturday between 8.00pm and 10.30pm has been told to get tested for COVID-19 and isolate for 14 days.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW Health Minister demands an end to Queensland border closure 'pettiness' as COVID-19 cases rise
The NSW Health Minister has stepped up his attacks on the Queensland Premier over the strict border closure, calling her "cruel" for keeping Australians apart.

NSW is racing against the clock to trace three new locally acquired COVID-19 cases before the 'border clock' is reset by Queensland.

Queensland authorities have refused to budge on the condition NSW must have 28 days of no unknown community transmission before it will open the border.

Queensland yesterday gave NSW 48 hours to link the new cases to known sources and stay on track for a November 1 border re-opening.

This morning Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk extended that deadline by another day.

"There's another 24 hours for them to look at where those cases came from," Premier Palaszczuk said.

"[I'm] looking forward to what the Premier of NSW has got to say.

"We hope NSW gets on top of those cases very quickly."

But NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard said he was fed up with the constant border battle and made a plea for compassion.

"I'm over it … I've got to say I think Premier Palaszczuk is being political — she is being cruel," he said.

"I think it's time that this pettiness was put aside and we move forward. We're all Australians."

Mr Hazzard said he was constantly receiving requests from residents of NSW facing "some very sad situations" and desperate to reunite with family over the border.

"The range of circumstances that families need to gather together … to give each other caring support is just enormous."

NSW yesterday reached a milestone of 12 COVID-free days, but the new cases mean the state may be forced to start the 28-day countdown again.

Queensland authorities have said there was a "nationally consistent approach" that gave states two to three days to determine the source of transmission from new cases.

However NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian this morning said she had never heard of such criteria.

"I hadn't heard it until I heard it yesterday through the news ... so I don't know where they got that from," she said.

Ms Berejiklian said she did not want NSW's contact tracers to be put under unnecessary pressure.

"Does it matter how long it takes our experts to find the links? Sometimes it might take them a couple of hours, sometimes it might take a few days," she said.

The Premier said the current situation demonstrated just how unrealistic Queensland's 28-day rule was.

"Until the end of the pandemic, it's highly unlikely that NSW will ever get to 28 days of no community transmission, because that is not how a pandemic works," she said.

NSW residents are already allowed to travel into South Australia without needing to quarantine and the Northern Territory is set to reopen its doors to Sydneysiders tomorrow.

Tasmania plans to reopen its borders to low-risk COVID states from the end of October, but Western Australia is still not budging on its hard border.

From October 16, travellers from New Zealand can enter NSW and the NT without completing quarantine.

However the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade continues to advise against its residents travelling overseas.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
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