Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orders".

Post topics and discussions that have nothing to do with bearded dragons or reptiles here!!!

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Sep 08, 2020 5:25 am

8 SEPT VIC
Victoria records 55 new coronavirus cases and eight deaths as Daniel Andrews defends roadmap from Hard Lockdown Stage 4 and Stage 3 in Regional Victoria to Covid Normal over up to 6 months.
Premier Daniel Andrews has defended Victoria's roadmap against criticism from the Prime Minister, saying the "worst case scenario" would be opening the state just to close down again in a few weeks.

Victoria has reported 55 new coronavirus infections and eight further deaths on Tuesday, taking the state's COVID-19 death toll to 683.

The deaths include two men in their 60s, two men in their 80s, and one woman and three men in their 90s.

Six of those deaths were linked to aged care settings, Premier Daniel Andrews said.

The case numbers are a slight increase on Monday's 41 new infections, which was the lowest daily total recorded in Victoria in more than 10 weeks.

The Premier said no new cases were recorded in regional Victoria overnight, but urged people to continue getting tested if they had symptoms.

"I want to thank everyone across regional Victoria from big regional cities to the smallest of country towns — you are doing an amazing job."

About 8,700 coronavirus tests were processed across Victoria yesterday.

Mr Andrews praised the work of regional public health teams and said suburban equivalents would be established "at all points on the compass".

"Whether it is in the Colac outbreak [or] some cases down in the Latrobe Valley … those regional public health teams have been very, very successful," he said.

There are now 238 Victorians in hospital with coronavirus, including 22 people in intensive care.

Thirteen of those 22 people are on a ventilator.

Vic facing 'very, very different' challenge to NSW, Premier says
Under Victoria's roadmap out of restrictions, Melbourne needs to record a 14-day daily average below 50 cases in order to progress to the second step on September 28.

The 14-day average reported by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) yesterday was 84.8 in metropolitan Melbourne and 5.3 in regional Victoria.

DHHS is expected to release today's 14-day average in its daily update this afternoon.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison yesterday criticised Victoria's roadmaps and said if the trigger points to lift restrictions also applied in New South Wales, then Sydney would be under curfew.

"The plan that was outlined yesterday, I hope, is a worst case scenario," Mr Morrison said yesterday.

But Mr Andrews defended the roadmap and said the data underpinning the steps was "clear cut".

"We're grateful for the partnership that we have but in my judgement … I think I've got some insight into what's happening here in our state," he said.

"The worst case scenario is you're open for three or four weeks because you pretend it's over when it isn't and then we're all back locked down again.

"The data, the doctors, the science [says] the only way to go is to do this in safe and steady steps."

Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton has said if case-number goals are met early, some restrictions might be relaxed earlier than indicated in the roadmap.

However, he said he did not want to make any promises, and said any changes would depend on data.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Victorian coronavirus restriction questions answered on work, JobKeeper, surgery, masks, travel and kids
It's a plan with a lot of details.

Victoria's restriction roadmap for regional Victoria and Melbourne cover everything from who you can see and how, when people can return to work, when holidays might be allowed, and how long you will have to wait to have a haircut.

We've received a lot of questions from you, the ABC audience.

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions, answered.

When will I be able to return to the office?
In Melbourne, only permitted workers can attend worksites during steps one and two (with more worksites permitted in step two).

These additional worksites will largely be across construction, manufacturing, wholesale trade and warehousing, and postal distribution centres.

For people working from home, the Melbourne roadmap says they should continue to do so if they can during the third and fourth step of the recovery, with a phased return to many workplaces only beginning once the city reaches a 'COVID normal' level.

Victoria will only reach a COVID normal phase once it has gone 28 days with no new cases across the state. If the state reaches all of its targeted dates, and then doesn't see any new cases, this could occur in late December.

In regional Victoria, only permitted workers will be able to attend worksites during the first step of the roadmap restrictions.

From step two to step four, the Victorian Government will ask regional residents working from home to continue to do so if they can.

Like Melbourne, there will be a phased return to offices once the state reaches a COVID normal level.

Can I still get JobKeeper during Victoria's extended lockdown?
Federal Parliament passed an extension to the JobKeeper program at the start of the month.

It means JobKeeper will continue until March next year, with some changes to payments and eligibility.

The $1,500 fortnightly payment will be reduced to $1,200 in late September, and to $1,000 in early January for full-time workers.

Businesses will need to prove they're still in financial distress each quarter, and are down at least 30 per cent on pre-pandemic levels, to remain eligible for the program after September.

When will elective surgeries begin again?
The Victorian Government is yet to announce when elective surgeries will recommence.

Across the state, all category three and two elective surgery has been suspended to ensure hospitals have the beds, equipment and staff needed to treat coronavirus patients.

Urgent surgeries are still taking place and IVF treatment has been exempt from restrictions.

Premier Daniel Andrews yesterday told media the State Government would outline its plan for elective surgery when it was safe for these procedures to restart.

"That will also include a really significant blitz so that we can catch up on the time we have lost," he said.

"So that we can get back into that position where we are doing more surgery than we have ever done."

Do we still have to wear masks?
Masks remain compulsory in Victoria, outside of your own property.

Mr Andrews said masks were playing a part in the state's effort to bring down coronavirus case numbers.

"Yes, it's a pain, no-one enjoys it," he said.

"But compared to being locked at home, compared to people becoming gravely ill … I think masks are something we should continue to do."

When will country Victorians be allowed to travel domestically?
For residents in regional Victoria, travel to other parts of the state outside of Melbourne will be allowed once they reach step three.

Accommodation businesses will be able to open, with caps on bookings in line with social bubble restrictions.

Once regional Victoria reaches step four at the end of November at the earliest, residents will be able to travel throughout the state and accommodation businesses will be fully open.

For those keen to see family and friends in other states, the wait will likely be a bit longer and depends on when state borders reopen.

Last week, all states except Western Australia agreed to aim for borders to be open by Christmas, but there are no guarantees at this step.

#victoriacaseslookupEMBED

When will Melburnians be able to travel to regional Victoria?
Residents of Melbourne will have to wait until the city reaches step three before being able to leave the city.

That's when accommodation businesses will be able to reopen, too.

By the final step of the plan, Melbourne residents will be able to travel the state without any restrictions, and accommodation businesses will be fully open.

What care is allowed for children in the home?
Mr Andrews said for Melbourne residents, in home care would be allowed for children from September 28 if the city reached the second step by that date.

"There won't be a need for a permit — it will mirror, in essence, the arrangements that are going to apply in childcare in broader settings," Mr Andrews said.

Residents in regional Victoria will move to the second step of recovery on September 13, with childcare and early education open from that date.

Can we go to skate parks after September 13?
Mr Andrews said skate parks in Melbourne wouldn't reopen until the city entered step three of the recovery, which will be from October 26 at the earliest.

It will be an earlier reopening for outdoor gym equipment.

He said outdoor gym equipment in parks would reopen from the first step on September 13.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

High-risk coronavirus locations revealed in Victoria
A list of high-risk locations for contracting coronavirus in Victoria has been revealed by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).
The locations include places where someone infected with COVID-19 has attended.

The list has been published as part of the state's new data dashboard of coronavirus figures on the DHHS website.

The high-risk locations include:
Image
"The locations listed are where there is a higher risk you may have been exposed to coronavirus (COVID-19)," it read.

"The information is based on advice provided to the department by people who are confirmed cases."

Risk locations will remain on the list for 14 days from the most recent exposure.

The locations are not a current risk to the public and people can visit them in line with current restrictions.

Health authorities have urged people who have visited the locations during the dates indicated to watch for coronavirus symptoms and get tested immediately if any symptoms present.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

IMPROVING CONTACT TRACING IN VICTORIA
Salesforce to digitise Victoria's Covid contact tracing after federal criticism
Victoria is swapping pens, paper and fax machines for digitised contact tracing and localised health teams amid criticisms it has been too slow to come into line with tracing efforts in other states.
<< I'm SURPRISED the Vic Department of Health was still relying on out of date media and methods , and hadn't moved to digital technologies >>
As the state reported 55 new cases of Covid-19 and eight more deaths on Tuesday, the Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, announced significant changes to the way the state has been tracing confirmed Covid-19 cases.

The government will establish five suburban coronavirus response teams based in the north, south, south-east and west of metropolitan Melbourne.

The exact locations will be determined after consultations, but health teams will be similar to those already in place in regional Victoria.

The government has also recruited tech giant Salesforce to provide an digitised system covering the whole contact tracing process – from test results to interviews, phone calls, and the management of cases and contacts.
“The Salesforce product … is about trying to consolidate and align many different platforms into one platform,” Andrews said. “That is happening now and just means that there is less pen and paper, there is less manual data entry.”
He said it will allow teams to be based remotely because they’ll be able to access the data from anywhere in the state.

Victoria’s chief health officer, Prof Brett Sutton, told 3AW radio that the system would be automated and people would receive a text notification when they tested positive.

Asked why Victoria hadn’t taken up the offer for the system in March, as Western Australia and South Australia did, Sutton said Victoria “didn’t know” what would be required and what the weaknesses of the existing system would be.

“It was also pretty clear that March was our busiest time in the first wave and you don’t change the entire system and retrain everyone right in the middle of it,” he said.

Sutton said fax machines and phone calls are still being used in GP practices where software doesn’t link with department systems.

Related: Victoria warned it must zero in on best measures to avoid another coronavirus shutdown

The automated system will run in parallel to the existing contact tracing efforts of 2,600 workers in the state to ensure a smooth transition.

More staff could be added to help boost efforts at a later date.

Andrews said Victoria would also use an IBM artificial intelligence product from the defence department to provide predictive modelling “that can help you pick up patterns that might not be necessarily obvious”.

Australian Defence Force members as well as senior officials from the state’s Department of Health and Human Services will travel to Sydney this week to compare the response in Victoria to New South Wales, to see if anything can be added to what Victoria is currently doing with contact tracing, Andrews said.

The announcement came after the federal government had criticised contact tracing efforts in Victoria as not being as good as those in NSW. Both the prime minister, Scott Morrison, and the federal health minister, Greg Hunt, said Victoria needed to make improvements in its contact tracing as the state moved through the roadmap to opening up.

“We want to help Victoria improve contact tracing, achieve the standards of NSW, and be able to bring Victorians out of lockdown and into greater freedoms progressively, but on a faster timetable with greater return to businesses, livelihoods and reducing the impact on mental health, which we’ve all heard over the last 48 hours has been absolutely crushing,” Hunt told Channel 7’s Sunrise.

Prior to today’s announcement, Andrews had rejected criticism of the state’s contact tracing efforts, pointing to the national benchmark data that shows Victoria is close to meeting the benchmarks on cases being contacted and interviewed within 24 hours, and close contacts being identified within 48 hours.

When asked why Victoria hadn’t brought about these changes before the second wave, and if it could have prevented much of the second wave, Andrews said he didn’t accept that and the process has been about continual improvement and learning from the other states.

“There’s no rulebook. There’s no playbook. There’s no guide here,” he said.

“This is something none of us have done before and therefore you all learn from each other and there are plenty of insights that we’ve provided to NSW and Queensland and South Australia.”

Sutton said he knows that in the initial outbreak from hotel quarantine in late May and early June, the cases were interviewed, told to isolate and their close contacts were contacted.

“But it escapes, and it’s gone to places that are linked by genetics with those original cases, but we don’t have an epidemiological link, and it was a super spreader event … I do know we followed up the cases and close contacts,” he said.

“I wish the system were as robust then as it is now … I can’t say it would have been stopped with a NSW system by any means.”

The online dashboard for Covid cases in Victoria will soon contain information about outbreaks in health workplaces, and the 14-day rolling average will be included in data for metropolitan Melbourne and regional Victoria, given it is the metric used to decide the easing of restrictions.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/sa ... d=msedgdhp
<< IMO , it's pretty unfair to compare the contact tracing effectiveness in Victoria in the 2nd wave with the effectiveness of contact tracing in NSW, QLD, SA, NT & WA where the daily new cases at the peak of 2nd wave were only a few % those the Victorians needed to cope with , I agree with Prof Sutton that no existing contact tracing system currently in existance would have coped , even if Andriod contact tracing was made a compulsory automatic download & install and were made impossible to opt out off if you owned a phone with a wireless or Bluetooth connectivity which would have had to be turned on automatically and again unable to be opted out off for the duration of pandemic .
(Of cause some people would simply turn off their mobile phones or other mobile devices or simply leave them at home.).

Victoria launches 'suburban response units' to boost coronavirus contact tracing
The Victorian Government has announced it will use artificial intelligence and five new 'suburban response units' to bolster its coronavirus contact tracing efforts after the Federal Government criticised its response to outbreaks.

Premier Daniel Andrews announced the initiatives as Victoria reported 55 new coronavirus infections and eight further deaths.

The Premier said the artificial intelligence tool the state was introducing was an IBM product based on Australian Defence Force science.

"It is used for other things and that is a matter for the ADF. But it has been adapted — it has been retro-fit, if you like — to give us some of that predictive capacity that can help you pick up patterns that might not necessarily be obvious," he said.

"That is in development now."

Yesterday, Mr Andrews said while interviews were read over by members of the contact tracing team, artificial intelligence could scour the documents to find links across weeks or months.

He said contact tracing needed to be a mix of both high-tech and "common sense, old-fashioned stuff" like doorknocking, calling, and completing interviews.

"Machine learning, artificial intelligence, predictive stuff that's not built for a pandemic, but is really valuable in these circumstances," he said today.

"It lets you see patterns that would take thousands and thousands of hours of staff going through things, so all that time can be saved."

The suburban teams will be built over the coming weeks and will "give rapid local insights and leverage community connections to help keep localised outbreaks contained", the Government said in a statement.

The Premier said teams would mirror those already set up in regional centres and would be located in the north, south, south-east and west of Melbourne.

"We will make sure that we have got those local teams, who I think come into their own when there [are] very low numbers, but the tolerance for keeping those numbers low is also very, very small," he said.

"That will be about trying to provide the very best and localised response, not to hundreds of cases — that is appropriately centralised — but to very small numbers of cases in local areas, in local suburbs."

Victoria has been criticised for its contact tracing, with the Federal Government on Sunday saying restrictions were no substitute for improving contact tracing, and the Prime Minister describing NSW's contact tracing efforts as the "gold standard".

However, epidemiologist Rania MacIntyre has said NSW would be in the same boat as Victoria if it had a similar surge in cases, which reached more than 700 new daily infections at the peak of the state's second wave.

Colac outbreak response shows strength of local model
Jeroen Weimar, the former Public Transport Victoria boss who is now commander of community engagement and testing at the Department of Health and Human Services, said he had been working closely with regional public health partners over the past six weeks to devolve contact tracing.

"We do that because they know their communities, they know their environments and they are able to get on the ground far quicker by being close to the action," he said.

He said in recent weeks Barwon Health had dealt with 429 cases, leading to some 5,400 close contacts.



"The strength of that model is illustrated, if you look at a situation like the Colac outbreak," he said.

"Just two positive cases in that community led to 25 close contacts also contracting COVID.

"What was important about the Barwon Health response was that all of those close contacts were already quarantined because they had been able to undertake such swift close-contact matching, such swift contact tracing, that anyone who tested positive was already safely self-isolating, and there has been no further knock-on impact to the wider community."

Victoria's contact tracing team is made up of 2,600 people. NSW's team of 300 make up to 2,000 calls a day.

A comparision with NSW
NSW has a more decentralised health system of 15 districts, allowing for more local knowledge to inform the outbreak response.

The Premier was asked why it took five months to develop the suburban contact tracing teams.

He said it was about "continuous improvement" and rejected the suggestion that having them in place earlier would have lessened the severity of the second wave.

"The only way to avoid this sort of discussion is to blindly say: 'This system is perfect and it can't get any better'. I'm not saying that. I've never, ever said that," he said.

He was asked if Victoria's contact tracing teams had been disbanded between the first and second wave.

"Part of the problem … is when you believe, to the best of your judgement, to the best of the advice, that you had it beaten, only to then [find], clearly, we hadn't, you have to learn from that," he said.

Mr Andrews added that NSW teams had helped Victorian contact tracers when cases were at their peak.

"You all learn from each other, and there are plenty of insights that we've given to New South Wales and Queensland and South Australia," he said.

The Premier said the state was working with software company Salesforce on a new case and contact management system which would result in less "pen and paper" manual data entry.

The system will cover the whole program of contact tracing, from a positive result coming in to interviews, follow-up phone calls and clearing cases, and is being set up in parallel to the current process, "to ensure there is no dip in performance as we make improvements", the Government said in a statement.

The Premier said a more "devolved" response would allow regional and suburban teams to enter information into the same platform so "everyone can have line of sight of the same data ... in real time".

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/vi ... d=msedgdhp

QUARANTINE ISSUES CONTINUE
Victoria medical advisor underestimated role of objects in Covid quarantine hotel spread
Dr Simon Crouch, a senior medical advisor to the health department, told the state’s inquiry into hotel quarantine that fomite transmission – when diseases are passed on via objects – played a “larger role” than initially thought.
Crouch was the team leader of outbreak management for the Rydges and Stamford hotel outbreaks in Melbourne.
s of 1 May, Crouch wrote that fomite transmission was “not a significant source of transmission for local outbreaks”, the inquiry heard. But on Tuesday, he told the inquiry he had revised that opinion.

“This was prior to the Rydges [outbreak] and the experience of the Rydges and Stamford hotels has changed my opinion on that more,” he said.

“As of 1 May, I was aware fomite transmission was a possibility ... but we didn’t have much evidence from the cases and outbreaks we had seen at that point in Victoria that it had played a significant role.

“However, since then, it does appear that fomite transmission plays a larger role than I would have given it credit at that point.”

The inquiry also heard Crouch did not know “the precise manner” in which the outbreak squads at the two hotels managed it on the ground, despite him being the coordinator of both.

The counsel assisting the inquiry, Ben Ihle, asked him: “How is that you have said in your statement that you are not aware of the precise manner in which the squad performs its functions or the protocols under which they operate?”

Crouch said that the broad protocols were known, but that the “fine details” of what the squad did “on the ground” was under another coordinator and not within his remit.

“You, as the outbreak management team leader, were not aware of the precise manner in which the squad performs its functions, and you do not know, for example, the protocols under which they operate,” Ihle said.

Related: Victoria's hotel quarantine allowed guests out to attend funerals and visit sick relatives

Earlier on Tuesday, it was revealed a hotel quarantine guest had allegedly entered a convenience store outside their hotel. Victoria police tendered documents they had been sent, including photographs, that appeared to show guests leaving their facilities at the Pan Pacific Melbourne in South Wharf.

The Victoria police commander, Tim Tully, was sent multiple emails by a former police officer who raised concerns about how private security was managing hotel quarantine at the Pan Pacific.

One email from 15 April stated: “Nigel and Tim. We have got the quarantined people out again this morning. One has tried to enter a convenience store on-site.”

The former officer also sent through multiple photos that allegedly showed the breaches.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Victoria coronavirus hotel quarantine guests left designated area to go to convenience store, documents reveal
Victoria Police met with private security contractors two weeks into the bungled hotel quarantine program to discuss how to "better coordinate" security, internal emails have revealed.

The emails, included in documents provided to Victoria's hotel quarantine inquiry on Monday, showed the "forum" was labelled a high priority by police.

It was arranged after a former police officer expressed concerns to his former colleagues about how staff in one hotel were guarding guests.

The former officer, whose name is redacted from the documents, wrote to Victoria Police Commander Tim Tully over concerns returned guests appeared to be breaching the designated outdoor area for exercise at the Pan Pacific Hotel.

"Tim, we have quarantined people out again this morning, you will see one has tried to enter the convenience store," the former officer wrote.

In a separate email, with attached pictures, the former officer wrote: "I happen (sic) to see one guest go down Rona Walk and stand in front of urban hub (sic)."

"The guard went and spoke to him and he went back into the exclusion area."

In a later email, he told Commander Tully a guest had accessed a cafe.

"From my observations the exclusion zones are being poorly managed," he wrote.

"We even saw what looked like someone with a takeaway coffee."

The pictures of the quarantined guests exercising were forwarded to Assistant Commissioner Mick Grainger and then passed on to senior bureaucrats at the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

On April 14, Assistant Commissioner Grainger contacted a senior DHHS official and said a meeting between the hotel security and police should be organised.

An email the next day from Commander Tully indicated he would inform DHHS about the issues before the meeting, which was with Unified Security, Wilson Security and MSS Security.

"I will forward the pictures we received today so they have direct line of sight of this, it may mean DHHS directly engages with security to address the immediate concerns before it becomes an issue in the media," the email said.

Later emails from a DHHS official noted Victoria Police had concerns over how "security staff are implementing the DHHS exercise fresh air policy".

After the meeting, the officers agreed there were concerns around exercise but determined police would not be required to be on site at all hours.

In giving evidence at the inquiry last week, Commander Tully told a hearing there were no requests for police to be at the hotels at all hours.
Documents reveal five attempts or threats of suicide
An incident report sheet provided to the inquiry on Monday revealed there were five reports of "attempt or threats of suicide".

Commander Tully told the hearing "there was a very low number of significant incidents".

Three attempts or threats of suicide were reported at the Travelodge Hotel in Docklands, one was listed at the Four Points by Sheraton and another at the Novotel on Collins Street.

The incident report also said there was a brawl at Crown Metropol and six separate assaults across the quarantine hotels.

Meeting minutes show difficulty tracking international arrivals
The documents provided to the inquiry on Monday also revealed issues in accounting for returned travellers in the hotels.

In meeting minutes, taken by Emergency Management Victoria, it was noted the Department of Jobs (DJPR) was having difficulty in "reconciling" passengers.

"DJPR made progress yesterday to reconcile eight people. There are final gaps still urgently requiring DHHS support," the minutes said.

"This includes six people who were recorded on flights but not in hotels, and five people recorded in hotels who were not listed on the passenger manifest. DJPR are not able to resolve with the data they have access to."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/vi ... d=msedgdhp

HEALTH & AGED CARE
Coronavirus lockdown project has Shepparton students connecting with aboriginal community elders
New friendships and strong bonds are being formed by a lockdown mentorship program in northern Victoria, where high school students are connecting with older community members online.

The project, called Gen Connection, buddies students in years 9, 11 and 12 at Greater Shepparton Secondary College with senior members of the community.

Students phone their older mentor twice a week to connect and also gain information about their buddy's life in order to write their biography for a school assignment.

Yorta Yorta elder Aunty Pam Pederson, who is aged in her 70s, has formed a special bond with her buddy, Year 9 student Muna Brown.

"It's so great for the young ones to do something like this, involving the elders and having a yarn," Aunty Pam said.

"It allows us to form a very good relationship like I have with Muna. He's wonderful."

Muna began communicating with Aunty Pam about a month ago when students started remote learning.

"I really enjoy when he gives me a call," Aunty Pam said.

"I just hope he learns from me and gets a lot out of it."

Muna spends his time with Aunty Pam asking questions for her biography, which will include his illustrations.

However, Aunty Pam hopes their relationship will continue after he submits the assignment.

"It's an excellent program. I'm looking at this project as more than just answering these questions," she said.

"I'd like to help Muna further with his schooling and his goals."

The pair also discuss their mutual love of AFL and Aunty Pam encourages Muna to develop his leadership skills.

"I'm writing about where she grew up, her house and where she lives, how things were back in the day," Muna said.

"She also goes on about how Carlton are pretty good. She teaches me to do well and do my work."

Connecting and sharing stories
The project, developed by the Lighthouse Project and Shepparton South Rotary Club, initially included around 30 students and seniors but has since expanded.

"To date, I've probably got about 55 young people that are participating," said Amy Robinson, strategic project coordinator for Greater Shepparton Lighthouse Project.

"We're looking for more mentors to come on board; we have plenty of young people who are keen to get involved moving forward."

It all began when a Year 11 teacher at the school approached Ms Robinson with the idea during the first stage of lockdown.

"It's all about just connecting and sharing stories," Ms Robinson said.

"It's a fantastic example of how communities can rally together to support young kids that are struggling to engage during remote learning.

"It also has the dual benefit of supporting older people who are feeling isolated during these trying times."

The Lighthouse Project is also collecting data as part of the project. Students fill out an online form rating their feelings of connectedness and happiness after speaking with their mentor.

"We've actually got data overtime to show the project's aims are being achieved," Ms Robinson said.

"It's one of the things we're really proud of."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Perth based aged care nurse volunteer sent to Victoria contracts coronavirus as six others enter quarantine in Melbourne
A WA nurse who went to Melbourne to help with the city's coronavirus outbreak has been diagnosed with COVID-19, while six of her WA colleagues have been designated close contacts and quarantined.

WA Health Minister Roger Cook said the department was still trying to work out if it was best to quarantine the group in Melbourne or return them to Perth.

He said seven nurses on one team working in aged care had been tested on Sunday and one, a woman, had returned a positive result.

"Obviously we are doing everything possible to assist our nurse and the rest of the team," he said.

"The nurse has mild symptoms such as a dry cough but is otherwise fairly comfortable."

He said she was self-isolating in a special hotel known as Hotel For Heroes, while her colleagues were in isolation in a different hotel.

But Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) state secretary Mark Olson wants the seven nurses returned to Perth.

"At this stage they've been told they'll have to quarantine for two weeks in Melbourne," he said.

"Then they'll face a further two weeks of quarantine back in Perth.

"The nurses were told when they left Perth [that] were they to contract COVID-19 they'd be brought back to serve out their quarantine in WA.

"They all just want to come home."

Families worried, ANF says
Mr Olson said many other people who had contracted COVID-19 had been brought back to WA.

"Their families are concerned for them, they're on the other side of the country and they're not happy about the fact that the [WA] Government doesn't have any plans at this stage to get these nurses home," he said.

The group had been in Melbourne for more than three weeks.

Mr Olson said the aged care facility the nurses were working at had "essentially lost all its staff".

"I think it's hard to appreciate for those of us in Western Australia, where things are relatively normal, the impact that the pandemic has had, not just in the aged care sector but right through the public sector hospitals," he said.

"Elective surgery has been cut back or cancelled because they're needing the nurses to replace entire workforces in aged care areas."

Mr Cook said he did not know if an offer had been made to fly the nurses back if they contracted COVID-19 or needed to isolate.

"The Department of Health is currently working through the logistics of the best course of action for our team, whether to quarantine them in Melbourne or return them to Perth," he said.

He said 19 WA nurses in total had gone to assist in Melbourne, plus three support staff.

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BREACHES


Early morning ice cream leads to fine
Overnight, police issued 171 fines for breaching coronavirus restrictions, including 31 for failing to wear a face covering and 67 for breaching Melbourne's curfew.

Two women who were caught walking and eating ice cream at 2:00am, but told police they thought it was 6:00am, were among those fined.

Another woman was fined for being out after curfew after driving "from Geelong to Melbourne to buy a kebab".

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Woman who broke lockdown told police she travelled 75km for a KEBAB
A hungry woman caught breaking Melbourne's strict Stage Four coronavirus lockdowns told police she had driven 75km from her home to buy a kebab.
The woman was pulled over by officers in Werribee, south-west of Melbourne, on Monday night after the city's 8pm to 5am curfew was in effect.
When questioned, she told the officers she was from Geelong and had traveled the lengthy drive to Melbourne in search of the snack and was then going to visit her boyfriend in Werribee.

The woman was one of 171 people fined in Victoria for breaching the Chief Health Officer directions in Victoria in the last 24 hours.

Two women were also fined after they were caught out walking and eating ice-cream at 2am, telling police they thought it was 6am.

And a man was fined who was found cycling in South Melbourne after curfew who told police said he was going to visit his 'semi-intimate partner'.

In total the fines included 31 penalties for failing to wear a face covering when leaving home for one of the four approved reasons.

The four approved reason are to shop for food and necessary goods, to provide care, for compassionate reasons or to seek medical treatment, to exercise or for outdoor recreation, for work or education, if you can't do it from home.

Also 21 fines were dished out at vehicle checkpoints in Victoria and 67 people were fined for breaching Melbourne's curfew.

Across the state on Monday 21,482 vehicles were stopped at vehicle checkpoints, while 3,704 spot checks on people at houses, businesses and public places were conducted.

Since March 21 there have been 396,289 spot checks performed by authorities to ensure COVID-19 restrictions are being adhered to.

On Sunday, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews announced Stage Four restrictions would be extended for two weeks until the end of September.

Residents have become increasingly frustrated at the lockdown measures with protests breaking out on Saturday in Melbourne's CBD.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp


Illegal gathering suspected as Colac sees second spike in COVID-19 cases
An illegal gathering is believed to be at the centre of a south-west Victorian town's second coronavirus spike.

Colac's second outbreak began after a man became infected with the virus while in a Melbourne hospital undergoing treatment.

Unaware that he was infected, the man returned home and spread the virus to his family.

From there, the virus spread through the community, leading to the temporary closure of two major workplaces — a Bulla ice cream factory and the Australian Lamb Company abattoir, which was the site of the town's first outbreak.

It is understood an illegal gathering on August 29th facilitated the spread through the community.

This has led to active COVID-19 cases in the Colac Otway Shire jumping from eight, in the days prior to the party, to 25 on September 8.

Police are investigating the matter but have declined to comment.

The ABC understands police only found out about the party after the fact.

No complaints were made about it at the time.

Police are yet to issue fines due to concerns doing so might limit the amount of information partygoers are willing to give to contact tracers.

The second spike follows an earlier cluster that sprang up around the Australian Lamb Company abattoir and rapidly grew to almost 100 cases.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Sep 08, 2020 7:56 am

8 SEPT NSW
Concord Hospital closed to visitors until Friday after new coronavirus cases
Concord Hospital will be closed to all visitors until Friday after multiple COVID-19 cases were linked to the hospital in Sydney's inner west.

NSW Health reported three new cases on Tuesday linked to the hospital — two healthcare workers and a visitor — following an outbreak after a healthcare worker did a shift while infectious at the emergency department on September 1.

There are now seven cases linked to Concord Hospital and Liverpool Hospital in south-west of Sydney, where the initial case also worked on September 3.

Five cases have been connected to Concord Hospital specifically, including the initial emergency ward worker.

The hospital will be closed from 8:00am on Wednesday to 10:00am on Friday for cleaning of all wards.

NSW Health acknowledged it was a "worrying time" but said there would be arrangements for people to contact loved ones by phone or video calls.

"There is no evidence that there is ongoing risk in the hospital and patients should continue to visit to receive the medical care they need," NSW Health said in a statement.

It came as health authorities issued alerts for various new Sydney venues.

The China Doll restaurant in Woolloomooloo had an infectious person dine there on Thursday, September 3.

NSW Health said a "small number" of patrons and staff were considered close contacts and were being directed to get tested and isolate for 14 days.

Other people there that night should monitor for symptoms until September 17.

Elsewhere, anyone at these venues at these times must get a coronavirus test and isolate for 14 days, even if they get a negative result:

Oatlands Golf Club on Friday, September 4, 6:30pm-8:45pm in connection to a Bavarian night dinner in the Bistro on Bennington dining room
Paperboy Cafe in Concord, Sunday, September 6, 10:00am-12:00pm
Earlier, NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard said Sydney hospitals were "among the safest places in the world".

"The fact that we have had a very small number of health staff who have also fallen victim to COVID is not unexpected," he said.

Mr Hazzard said approximately 100 staff had been asked to isolate for 14 days.

He said the hospital system could cope with the loss for two weeks.

"The NSW Health system is the 10th biggest business in the country, there's 140,000 staff," he said.

"Yes, we certainly do have enough staff to make sure the positions are filled.

"Our hospitals are among the safest places in the world to be so I would encourage the community to still go to hospital if you need to go to hospital."

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said contact tracing teams from Melbourne and Federal Government agencies would be joining efforts in Sydney.

NSW Health recorded nine new coronavirus infections on Tuesday.

Yesterday's cases included a student at Kincoppal Rose Bay School of the Sacred Heart, in Sydney's eastern suburbs, which was linked to the CBD cluster.

NSW Health's Jeremy McAnulty said the student was a boarder.

"All boarders and staff in the boarding area have been identified as close contacts," he said.

"Boarding operations at the school have been suspended, and students are isolating at home with their families."

Another case from yesterday's figures was from south-eastern Sydney was also reported but had no identifiable source.

Dr McAnulty said another case was a household contact of a previously reported case linked to the CBD cluster, which now stands at 66.

The remaining three were returned travellers from hotel quarantine.

Health authorities also added a number of Sydney businesses, including cafes and gyms to its health alerts.

Anyone who attended Plus Fitness in Epping on September 5, between 9:00am — 10:15am is considered a close contact and should immediately present themselves for testing and isolate for 14 days.

Meanwhile, anybody who attended the following venues is considered a casual contact and should monitor for symptoms.

Stanhope Village Shopping Centre, including Kmart Stanhope Gardens, on Monday, September 7, 8:30am-9:30am
Clovelly Hotel on Saturday, September 5, 12:45pm-1:45pm
Rouse Hill town centre, including Target Rouse Hill, on Saturday, September 5, 12.30pm-1pm.
Fitness First Maroubra, 737 Anzac Parade Maroubra, on Saturday, September 5, 8:00am‑12:00pm
Charles St Kitchen in Putney on September 5, between 10:45am - 11:30am
Eastwood Ryde Netball Association in West Ryde on September 5, between 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Missing Spoon Cafe in Wahroonga on 5 September between 4:45pm – 5:30pm
Croydon Park Pharmacy on 3 September between 1:00pm – 2:00pm
NSW Health said it was working with Fitness First to identify close contacts of the case at the gym on Saturday morning and will advise them directly.

There were 12,494 COVID-19 tests reported yesterday, compared to 10,129 from the day before.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW authorities fear contaminated pens and computers are spreading COVID-19
NSW authorities are investigating whether contaminated pens, keyboards and computer screens are behind a coronavirus cluster at two major Sydney hospitals.

Five cases have been linked to emergency departments at Liverpool and Concord hospitals after a doctor tested positive on the weekend causing over 100 staff to be forced into self-isolation.

All staff wore personal protective equipment while working.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

<< While this is a potential source of contamination/infection , the it's since come to light that a visiting specialist who worked one day per week in each hospital is the likely source , spreading covid19 while asymptomatic after contracting in his rooms , or one of the hospitals or while mingling in public (when "his" guard was lowered).

This is typical of the kind of unsubstantiated nonsense regularly promoted my SKYE News , who rarely fact check >>

Sydney school boarder among state's new COVID-19 cases
Nine new cases of COVID-19 have been diagnosed in NSW in the last 24 horus.

One previously reported case has been excluded following further testing.

Of the nine new cases, three are returned travellers in hotel quarantine and five are linked to a known case or cluster.
Three more cases linked to hospital cluster, another to Sydney school
One case from Sydney's south east is still under investigation.

One new case is a boarder at Kincoppal Rose Bay School of the Sacred Heart and is linked to the CBD cluster.

All boarding operations have been suspended while students self-isolate at home.

Another of the new cases is a household contact of a previously reported case linked to the CBD cluster, bringing the total number of people linked to the outbreak to 66.

https://twitter.com/NSWHealth/status/13 ... 1141266432
Three of the locally acquired cases are linked to Concord Hospital.

The two healthcare workers worked at the emergency department however they reported having no symptoms while at work and were wearing PPE equipment while working.

There is now a total of seven people associated with Concord and Liverpool hospital outbreaks.

One new case is a household contact of a previously reported case linked to the CBD cluster, NSW Health said.

A positive coronavirus case has been found to have visited the Plus Fitness on Beecroft Road in Epping on Saturday.

Anyone who was there from 9am to 10.15am that day are considered close contacts and must immediately self-isolate and get tested. They must stay isolated for 14 days regardless of the result.

NSW health has also added a number of venues around Sydney which are now on COVID alert after positive cases visited the venues while possibly infectious.

Anyone who visited the following venues is considered a casual contact and should monitor their health for any symptoms of COVID-19.

Charles Street Kitchen in St Putney on 5 September between 10.45 - 11.30am
Eastwood Ryde Netball Association, Meadowbank Park in West Ryde on 5 September between 12.15pm - 1.30pm
Missing Spoon Cafe in Wahroonga on 5 September between 4.45 - 5.30pm
Croydon Park Pharmacy on 3 September between 1pm - 2pm
NSW conducted 12,494 tests in the latest reporting period, compared with just over 10,000 the previous day.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW Covid-19 hotspots: list of regional and Sydney outbreak locations
List of outbreaks in NSW
If you were at the following venues on these dates you must get tested and self-isolate for 14 days, even if your test is negative.

Four in Hand Pub, Paddington: 6.30pm to 10pm on Wednesday 26 August, guests who attended downstairs at this time for more than two hours
It’s Time For Thai, Newtown: 5pm to 8pm on Friday 28 August
Kuleto’s Cocktail Bar, Newtown: 6.30pm to 9.30pm on Friday 28 August
Anytime Fitness, Marrickville: 7pm to 8pm on Monday 24 August
City Tattersalls fitness centre, Sydney: 8am to 2pm on Wednesday 19 August, Friday 21 August, Sunday 23 August, Monday 24 August, Tuesday 25 August. Other members of City Tattersalls should get tested if they have even the mildest symptoms.
Hyde Park Medical Centre, Sydney: Monday 24 August to Saturday 5 September. Anyone who worked at Hyde Park Medical Centre (including physiotherapy, pathology, dermatology and dental practices and pharmacy on the ground floor of the building) should get tested immediately and self-isolate until a negative result is received.
Virgin Gym, Zetland: People who attended the active dance class at 7.40pm on Monday 24 August.
Fitness First, Randwick: Anyone who attended between Sunday 23 August and Tuesday 1 September should monitor for symptoms and if they develop, get tested right away and self-isolate.
Life in the Spirit Ministry, Prestons: Sunday 30 August, 12:30pm to 2:30pm
New Brighton Golf Club, Moorebank: 6:15pm on Friday 28 August to 12:30am on Saturday 29 August
With the growing number of cases in the area, NSW Health is asking all people who live in, or have visited, the following areas in the past two weeks to get tested if they have any symptoms of Covid-19 at all, even the mildest of symptoms such as a runny nose or scratchy throat.

Bankstown (suburb)
Cumberland local government area (LGA)
City of Sydney (East) LGA (includes central Sydney and the suburbs Surry Hills, Darlinghurst, Woolloomooloo, Potts Point, Rushcutters Bay, Elizabeth Bay, Centennial Park)
Fairfield LGA
Ku-ring-gai LGA
Liverpool LGA
Mt Druitt (suburb)
Parramatta LGA
Randwick LGA
Sutherland LGA
Waverley LGA
Willoughby LGA
Woollahra LGA
If you were at any of the following locations on these dates, monitor yourself for symptoms and self-isolate and get tested if symptoms occur.

Chemist Warehouse, Balmain: 2pm to 2.30pm on Friday 28 August
Woolworths, Balmain: 10am to 11am on Thursday 27 August
Balmain Community Pharmacy, Balmain: 11am to 11:20am on Monday 31 August
Platinum Fitness First, Bondi Junction: 7am to 5pm on Monday 31 August
Quality Suites (foyer), Camperdown: 3:15pm to 4:30pm on Saturday 29 August
Rydges Hotel, Camperdown: 2pm to 3.15pm on Saturday 29 August
University of Sydney Carslaw building toilets, Camperdown: 8pm to 8.20pm on Friday 28 August
Sushi Rio, Chatswood: 5.45pm to 7.30pm on Thursday 27 August
Westfield, Chatswood: 1pm to 1:50pm on Thursday 27 August
Gram Café and Pancakes, Chatswood: 11:10am to 12:15pm on Thursday 27 August
Broadway shopping centre, Glebe: 3.30pm to 5pm on Saturday 22 August
Broadway shopping centre Apple Store, Glebe: 3.40pm-4.40pm on Saturday 22 August
Metrol Fuel, Greystanes: 3.15pm to 3.35pm on Thursday 27 August
PRP Diagnostic Imaging, Hornsby: 10am to 11.15am on Monday 24 August
Metro Petroleum, Hurlstone Park: 10.20am to 10.30am on Monday 24 August
Leaf Café & Co, Lidcombe: Lidcombe Shopping Centre11:30am to 1:30pm on Monday 31 August
Randwick Golf Club, Malabar: 11.50am to 12.20pm on Tuesday 25 August
Big Bun, Merrylands: 3.30pm to 4pm on Sunday 23 August
Stockland, Merrylands: 9am to 11am on Saturday 29 August
Archie Bear cafe, Mosman Rowers: 11am to 12pm on Monday 24 August and 9am to 9.30am on Tuesday 25 August
Newtown Train Station, Newtown: 5.10pm to 5.20pm on Friday 28 August
BWS, Newtown: 5.15pm to 5.40pm on Friday 28 August
Off Ya Tree Clothing, Newtown: 7.15pm to 7.55pm on Friday 28 August
Aldi, North Strathfield: 10am to 10:30am on Tuesday 1 September
Bunnings Warehouse, Padstow: 12pm to 2pm on Thursday 27 August
God’s Power Ministries Heckenberg, Prestons: 2:50pm to 3:30pm on Sunday 30 August
Rosebery post shop, Rosebery: 1.30pm to 1.40pm on Wednesday 26 August
St Ives shopping centre, St Ives: 2.30pm to 3.30pm on Monday 24 August and 5.30pm to 6pm on Wednesday 26 August
Coles St Ives Shopping Centre, St Ives: 1pm to 2pm on Friday 28 August
300 George Street, Sydney: Wednesday 19 August, Thursday 20 August, Friday 21 August, Monday 24 August
Virgin Active Mary Street, Sydney: 5.10pm to 6.40pm on Wednesday 26 August
Virgin Active Pitt Street, Sydney: 5pm to 6.30pm on Tuesday 25 August
Warriewood Shopping Centre, Warriewood: 12.30pm to 2.30pm on Saturday 29 August, including Kmart, Coles, Aldi and the food court
Magpies Waitara restaurant, Waitara: 24 August from 11.30am to 1.15pm
Mater Clinic, Wollstonecraft: 8.30am to 9am on Friday 28 August
Virgin Gym, Zetland: 7.30pm to 10pm on Monday 24 August (applies to members who did not attend the 7.40pm active dance class)
If you travelled on any of the following public transport routes on these dates, monitor yourself for symptoms and self-isolate and get tested if symptoms occur.

Thursday 20 August and Friday 21 August:

Bus route 755, at 5.18am, from Mount Druitt station to Shalvey shops
Bus route 755, at 5.35am, from Shalvey shops to Mount Druitt
Bus route 758, at 6.01am, from Mount Druitt station to St Mary’s station
Bus route 758, at 6.35am, from St Mary’s station to Mount Druitt station
Bus route 723, at 7.14am, from Mount Druitt station to Blacktown station
Bus route 731, at 8.15am, from Blacktown station to Rouse Hill station
Bus route 752, at 9.03am, from Rouse Hill station to Blacktown station
Bus route 755, at 10.47am, from Plumpton marketplace to Mount Druitt station
Bus route 756, at 11.29am, from Mount Druitt station to Blacktown station
Bus route 728, at 12.16pm, from Blacktown station to Mount Druitt station
Monday 24 August:

Bus route 6546, at 2.36pm, from St Clare Catholic high school
Bus route 6583, at 3.15pm, from Patrician Brothers’ college to Blacktown station via Blacktown South public school and St Patrick’s primary school
Bus route 728, at 3.34pm, from Blacktown station to Mount Druitt station
Bus route 756, at 4.32pm, from Mount Druitt station to Blacktown station
Bus route 730, at 5.25pm, from Blacktown station to Castle hill shopping centre
Bus route 730, at 6.18pm, Castle Hill from to Blacktown station
Bus route 723, at 7.48pm, from Blacktown station to Mount Druitt station
Bus route 750, at 8.38pm, from Mount Druitt station to Blacktown station
Bus route 750, at 9.14pm, from Blacktown station to Mount Druitt station
Bus route 758, at 9.50pm, from Mount Druitt station to Emerson/Luxford
Bus route 729, at 10.37pm, from Mount Druitt station to Blacktown station
Bus route 731, at 1.32pm, from Blacktown station to Rouse Hill station
Central coast train, at 6.49am from Woy Woy, arriving 8.05am at Wynyard, stopping at Woy Woy, Berowra, Hornsby, Gordon, Chatswood, Artarmon, St Leonards, Wollstonecraft, Waverton, North Sydney, Milsons Point, Wynyard
Central Coast train, at 5.31pm from Town Hall, arriving 6.53pm at Woy Woy, stopping at Town Hall, Wynyard, Milsons Point, North Sydney, Waverton, Wollstonecraft, St Leonards, Artarmon, Chatswood, Gordon, Hornsby, Berowra, Woy Woy
Tuesday 25 August:

Central Coast train, at 6.49am from Woy Woy, arriving 7.36pm at Gordon, stopping at Woy Woy, Berowra, Hornsby, Gordon
Central Coast train, at 7.53am from Hornsby, arriving 8.28am at Woy Woy, arriving at 8.28am, direct
T4, Sydney eastern suburbs train, at 8.32am from Bondi Junction to Martin Place, arriving at 8.42am, stopping at Edgecliff, Kings Cross
T4, Sydney eastern suburbs train, at 5.51pm from Martin Place to Bondi Junction, arriving at 6.05pm stopping at Kings Cross, Edgecliff
T1 Blacktown to City train, at 6.58am from Blacktown to Central, arriving at 7.45am
T1 City to Blacktown train, at 6.25pm from Townhall to Blacktown arriving at 7.18pm
Wednesday 26 August:

T4, Sydney ea
stern suburbs train, at 7.56am from Bondi Junction to Martin Place, arriving at 8.07am, stopping at Edgecliff, Kings Cross
T1 Blacktown to City train, at 6.59am from Blacktown to Central, arriving at 7.41am
T1 City to Blacktown train, at 6.38pm from Townhall to Blacktown arriving at 7.35pm

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

BREACHES
Six 'anti-lockdown protesters' charged over NSW 'Freedom Day' rallies
Police in New South Wales have charged six more people after a series of anti-lockdown protests that were held in Sydney and Byron Bay.

Large-scale police operations were launched in both Sydney and Melbourne yesterday as hundreds gathered for "Freedom Day" rallies in solidarity with people living currently under stage four lockdown restrictions.

NSW Police said today in a statement that two men, aged 45 and 34, were arrested at Sydney Olympic Park during the rallies.
The older man has since been charged with assaulting and resisting officers. Both men were charged with not complying with public health directions.

The pair have been granted conditional bail and are expected to appear at Burwood Local Court on September 24.

In Byron Bay, another four men were charged today after protests that were held yesterday on Johnsons Street and Bay Street.
A 34-year-old man was charged with assaulting and resisting an officer and granted conditional bail to appear at Byron Bay Local Court on September 21.
Police also charged a 36-year-old man, a 21-year-old man and a 42-year-old man with resisting, hindering or obstructing police and were also bailed to appear at the same court on September 28.

Authorities say the six charges come after three others were charged earlier over the protests and 81 Penalty Infringement Notices of $1000 each were handed out for people allegedly breaching NSW Public Health orders.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Sydney's beaches will close again in summer if crowds ignore coronavirus guidelines, councils warn
Sydney's beaches will be forced to close again over summer if crowd sizes mean COVID-19 restrictions are flouted, local mayors have warned.

Iconic Bondi Beach and other eastern and northern suburbs beaches were closed to swimmers during March and April and only reopened under strict regulations.

The closures came in the aftermath of the Ruby Princess cruise ship crisis as coronavirus numbers soared around Sydney.

Now large numbers of beachgoers are already being drawn back to the surf and sand as the weather warms up and planning is underway to manage the potential risks.

Waverley Mayor Paula Masselos said it would be a different summer under the continuing challenges posed by the pandemic.

"I think things are different and they'll have to be different because we're still in the middle of a pandemic," she said.

"Certainly I hope that we don't have to close the beaches.

"But if people don't do the right thing, and the beach has become too crowded then we'll have to look at how we manage those numbers because I don't want a repeat of what happened back in in March."

Some of the strategies used by councils included "swim and go", using restricted entry and exit points, and in Sydney's south, beach car parks were closed as a deterrent.

"When they showed up to Cronulla there was limited parking, so they had to move on. So I think that would be a measure that we would probably go down first before we close the beach," the Mayor of Sutherland Shire Council (SCC) Carmelo Pesce said.

"If we can manage and educate people and make sure that they move on and with the help of NSW Police, I think we would be able to manage it. But if we have to close, then we will," he said.

Northern Beaches Council is also warning it may close beaches "if crowds become too large and unmanageable".

Like councils in Sydney's east and south, it will be relying on a close relationship with NSW Police to enforce the four square metre rule and gatherings of no more than 20 people in public.

Council is still finalising its summer action plan, but rangers and lifeguards will continue to monitor coastal areas, CEO Ray Brownlee said in a statement.

"Council is also increasing its cleansing regime of popular outdoor public places, providing extra restrooms in key locations, and reviewing the need for Council-sponsored outdoor events during summer."

The ABC spoke to some local residents who had mixed reactions to the idea of restrictions being reimposed during the heat of summer.

Marcie, 21, was reading a book while sunbathing on Coogee Beach and was not impressed with the idea.

"No way! It's so hard when the weather's nice you just have to get down to the beach — it's too hot to hang around at home," she said.

"It would be a shame if the restrictions came back in because I think they're quite unnecessary."

Duygu, 32 from Newtown, said social distancing should be reinforced as a prevention measure.

"It would be nice if they really force us to have the social distancing because last weekend, not in Coogee, it was really crowded and we were side by side, super close to each other," she said.

"It's a huge risk, it takes only one person to spread it.

Retiree Anthony Debeck, 77, believes as hot weather returns people will not adhere to the rules.

"We swim here every day and I love the beach, I jog up and down every day. But if unfortunately the virus takes off again then we'll just have to close the beaches," he said.



https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/s ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Posts: 12574
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Sep 08, 2020 8:16 am

8 SEPT QLD

Queensland records one new case of coronavirus as support services increased for hotel quarantine
Queensland has recorded one new coronavirus case overnight, as the Government launches a new trial to increase support services for people forced into hotel quarantine.

The woman, who is in her late 20s, had recently returned from overseas and is currently in mandatory quarantine.

The state now has 25 active cases with 7,660 tests conducted in the last 24 hours.

Health Minister Steven Miles said the Government's pilot program would provide more social support for people forced into hotel isolation.

Currently, anyone returning from overseas or Queenslanders returning home, must quarantine in a nominated hotel at their own expense, and not at their home.

People from interstate COVID-19 hotspot areas who are given exemptions to enter the state, may also be sent to hotel quarantine.

Mr Miles said the trial would station support services at quarantine sites to assist vulnerable people.

"We're very aware of how hard the quarantine process can be for those who do not get granted an exemption," he said.

"[This program will] make quarantine easier for people with existing medical needs, disabilities and those caring for very young children.

"As part of the new targeted care accommodation program, elected hotels or alternative accommodation will have additional health or social support on site or close by.

"Stage one of the program is being conducted on those in quarantine and currently COVID-19 negative, by Metro South Hospital and Health Service in conjunction with Queensland Police Service."

The Government's hotel quarantine regime has come under criticism from people with medical needs who were denied exemptions to wait out their 14-day incubation period at home.

Mr Miles said the practice was in place to stop any COVID cases from mingling in the community.

"Our border restrictions are keeping Queenslanders safe and preventing the introduction of COVID-19 into the state. These new initiatives will help people with a genuine need to navigate these restrictions," he said.

"These services are run by clinicians who will make decisions based on medical need, not politics.

"And I would caution anyone who is looking to score cheap political points in this place with people's private medical histories."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Queensland hospital cluster
Reinforcement staff have been sent in to a hospital in south-east Queensland, which is now the new battleground for the state's COVID outbreak

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW students allowed home from Queensland boarding schools for school holidays after border rule changes
Hundreds of students facing the prospect of spending their school holidays at school have had a reprieve, with Queensland Health allowing boarders to return home to New South Wales without having to quarantine on re-entry.

Last month, NSW families who had children at school in Queensland, but lived outside the border bubble, were told they could bring them home for the holidays, but would face quarantine for two weeks on their return to the sunshine state.

Queensland Health has now relented, with Chief Health Officer Jeanette Young granting an exemption for primary and secondary boarding school students with a primary place of residence either in the ACT or a NSW local government area with no active cases of COVID-19.

The move has come as a welcome relief to many, including Isolated Children's Parents' Association NSW president Claire Butler.

"We're still pinching ourselves over it," she said.

"It's just wonderful to see that they are able to come home."

While the children will be able to return home, and parents will be able to travel to Queensland to collect them, some conditions will be in place for the holiday period.

The children must not leave the boundary of their primary residence for the entire time they are in NSW and no visitors to the residence are allowed, except for those essential to the operations of the residence.

'They won't be going anywhere'
Jo Slack-Smith farms at Burren Junction between Wee Waa and Walgett. Her three children board in Toowoomba.

"We are isolated, there is no Burren Junction High School," she said.

"For us it means our kids can just come home, there's restrictions, they won't be going anywhere while they are home.

"It's been very taxing on children and parents.

"It's very hard to field a call from a 12-year-old asking when they can come home and to be able to say 'yes' tonight is just wonderful."

Toowoomba's Fairholme College principal Linda Evans played an instrumental role in a social media campaign to change the rules and said she was relieved further changes were made.

"I'm just thrilled for our families and I'm thrilled for the families across Queensland," she said.

Dr Evans said the exemptions would make a big difference in the lives of students.

"I think they will just relish their time at home and I think it will make such a difference to their outlook about what next term looks like," she said.

"It will make a huge difference to the way in which they approach their final few weeks of preparation before they go into the first external exams."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

REGIONAL QLD
Coronavirus border shutdown delivers bushfire-ravaged Stanthorpe region a silver lining
After years of drought, water shortages and then last year's devastating bushfires, it has been a long wait for good news in Stanthorpe.

This time last year, Queensland's Granite Belt communities were fighting some of the first blazes in what would become Australia's worst-ever bushfire season.

Oddly enough, the global pandemic has delivered some unexpected relief, thanks to support from fellow Queenslanders.

"Having that hard border to the south has sort of concentrated the tourist attention on places like ours and so we've been very, very fortunate," Peter O'Reilly said.

The Queensland College of Wine Tourism CEO said after more than a year of battling natural disasters, Stanthorpe was grateful Queenslanders have been showing support.

"That's been a rather thick silver lining to the cloud of the last few months," Mr O'Reilly said.

Husband and wife owners of the Granite Belt Brewery, Dee and Geoff Davenport, have also noticed a boost in bookings since coronavirus restrictions were eased in July.

"Booked out basically, booked out solidly since the 12th of June, but the whole of our region has," Ms Davenport said.

"We were shut for three months with the pandemic," her husband explained.

"But since we've reopened on the 12th of June, it has gone gangbusters."

This time last year, they thought they were about to lose it all.

The college, along with the Granite Belt Brewery in the hills nearby, was two of the many businesses in Stanthorpe that came close to burning.

Spot fires broke out in the gardens of the college, and the Davenports watched as the bush around their property went up in flames.

"We thought we were gone — we thought we had — because we've got 20 cabins here, we thought we had no cabins left," Dee said.

Geoff was fighting fires with the Rural Fire Service elsewhere that night and watching from afar as the fire engulfed the brewery on Glenlyon Drive.

"I actually sent a text to Dee to say, 'I think we've lost a business … because the whole hill was gone'," he said.

Dee had evacuated all the guests from the brewery and cabins nestled in the trees.

"Why we haven't lost 30 houses in the district is a miracle," Geoff said.

The fires left thousands of people without power, forced dozens of families to flee their homes and many businesses to close.

Firefighters fought the blazes head-on and held back the flames from all but a handful of houses in the area.

Brad and Coral Krahe weren't so lucky.

Their house was reduced to rubble and left Mr Krahe's motorcycles a melted mess.

Coral says she fled with her animals.

"They say on the TV, you know, have your fire plan … my plan was, get the cats, get the dogs, get in the car and go, you know, that was my thing … that's what I did," she said.

Coral recounted watching the trees around their home go up in flames.

"I was watching it from down the road and it was really awful," she said.

"I don't really want to go through it ever again."

Brad said he wouldn't want anyone else to go through it either.

The Krahes recently moved back into a house built on the site where their old home burned down.

They rebuilt with special ***** features included in the design of their new house.

After Stanthorpe, new fires kept Queensland authorities busy for months as dozens of new blazes sparked almost every day across the state.

In Canungra on the Scenic Rim, about a dozen homes were destroyed, while properties in Peregian on the Sunshine Coast withstood a firestorm.

Police braved ember attacks to go door-to-door evacuating the residents.

Former Southern Downs mayor Tracy Dobie, who led her community through drought and water shortages, still vividly remembers waiting for the fires to come.

"I slept with my windows open, waiting for the smell of smoke because the fire danger was so severe last year … and I wasn't the only one who did that," she said.

This year, rains on the Granite Belt have prompted a new outbreak of the weed African lovegrass, but haven't been enough to break the drought.

The grass has prevented back-burning and local fire authorities remain worried it could dry out and become a hazard.

"We haven't been able to do a lot of the burning that we would have liked simply because the grass is so green, and so fire isn't running," Ms Dobie said.

"So there is a lot of, you know, fuel out there for bushfires.

"Of course, 2019 was the worst anyone had ever seen here and it leaves a scar on everybody, but you learn from that."

Having water in the dams is at least providing some peace of mind.

"We have had some great rainfall, the dams are full, so the advantage this time is there is plenty of water around to fight the fires, if they do start up again this fire season," Ms Dobie said.

Coral Krahe has a word of advice if it comes to that.

"I'd say get out — get your babies and get your animals and go," she said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Cooktown a boomtown as travellers bunker down in the wake of COVID-19
ourists from Victoria and New South Wales who managed to beat the Queensland border shutdown have all but taken over a small town in the far north of the state.

Cooktown, about 400 kilometres north of Cairns, has long been a magnet for tourists due to its remote seaside location, colourful locals and plentiful fishing.

Tourism authorities in the town say they have never been busier, thanks in part to interstate visitors — particularly from Melbourne — who are not in a hurry to return home to the city's strict Stage 4 COVID-19 lockdown.

It is a far cry from initial concerns that the Queensland border ban would send accommodation providers to the wall.

'Even busier than a normal year'
Cooktown Caravan Park owners Leslyn and Paddy Auchterlonie say they are turning away dozens of caravanners looking for a site every day.

"It is extremely busy and it is nothing to turn away 30 vans a day," Ms Auchterlonie said.

"It's even busier than a normal year.

"It was becoming so unmanageable for just the two of us, we had to put more staff on."

She said the park was full of cars towing caravans baring number plates from Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia — many of whom have been in Queensland for several months.

"Many people seem to be circling around Queensland," Ms Auchterlonie said.

"No-one is in a hurry to go back to that environment of severe lockdowns."

No hurry to return home
Priscilla and Matt Blackshaw, who usually call Brisbane home, only intended to visit Cooktown for a few weeks but have now been in the town since border restrictions were lifted in Cape York to Queenslanders in July.

"We're not in a rush to get back, we definitely feel safer up here, from COVID," Ms Blackshaw said.

"I have health issues and that's why I wanted to get away from the hustle and bustle, as far away from Brisbane as possible."

She said although she missed her family — including her 14 grandchildren and her 89-year-old mother — returning was not an option, just yet.

"It seems to be getting worse (COVID-19 cases), " she said.

"My husband is a big fisherman so he's very happy to stay here longer.

"We've let my son move into our house, because it was just sitting empty, and he's using the opportunity to save up for a house deposit."

She said that they were not the only ones not in a hurry to head home.

"We have met so many people that would normally be travelling overseas, but they've bought a caravan and they are seeing their own state," Ms Blackshaw said.

She said she had also picked up some work at the caravan park where she was staying, after she was approached by owner Ms Auchterlonie.

A 'normal' life
Ms Auchterlonie said she was pleased that the small seaside town was providing a haven for visitors.

"They can have a normal day, they can go fishing and enjoy themselves, " she said.

"They can be away from the traumatic events that are happening, like severe lockdowns."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

8 SEPT SA
South Australia records one new case of coronavirus in returned traveller
South Australia has recorded one new case of coronavirus, a woman in her 30s who travelled from overseas.

The woman, who is now in hotel quarantine, travelled from South Africa to South Australia, on her way to New South Wales.

Deputy Chief Public Health Officer Mike Cusack said she was not infectious and posed no risk of transmission to the public.

Dr Cusack said the woman, who was travelling alone, had an "old infection" of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, which she had contracted overseas.

He said the woman's infection was only added to South Australia's tally because this was her first COVID-19 test.

Health authorities do not consider the woman's infection to be an "active case".

That means there are still no known active cases in the state.

Dr Cusack said the woman was "very well, asymptomatic in fact".

Nonetheless, her diagnosis brings South Australia's cumulative total of recorded COVID-19 cases to 465.

Dr Cusack declined to identify the woman's flight because there was no risk to other passengers.

He added that more than 400,000 people had now had COVID-19 tests in South Australia.

About 85,000 South Australians had completed training to become COVID marshals.

Indian cricket team to train in quarantine
Dr Cusack also told reporters the Indian cricket team will need to train in small groups when they arrive in South Australia for quarantine ahead of the upcoming Test series.

"They will be allowed to train … in what you might consider smaller bubbles," he said.

"So there might be three or four players that would be allowed to train during their quarantine period and it would be the same consistent players.

"If you had the whole party training together and one person inadvertently tested positive all of them would become a close contact [and] everyone would need a further 14 days of isolation and quarantine."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

8 SEPT TAS
Tasmania's Make Yourself At Home COVID-19 travel voucher scheme full in 40 minutes
The Tasmanian Government's travel voucher scheme has closed, with the $7.5 million program fully subscribed within an hour of opening.

Many people reported issues with the site after the scheme opened at 9:00am on Monday, with some unable to get through or experiencing delays with the site loading.

Rosevears woman Michelle Frost was one of the people who missed out on vouchers, despite being on the website at 9:00am.

Ms Frost said the screen would not load properly and by the time it eventually did, she received a message saying all the vouchers were gone.

"We were pretty disappointed," she said.

"Obviously that was the issue, just so many people, and all of us hitting refresh at the same time."

Ms Frost said she had been hoping to take her family to the state's east coast.

"It just would have been nice that bit of an extra buffer," she said.

One person trying to register waited more than half an hour before being told that "unfortunately, it seems we were too popular".

"The voucher program is currently fully registered and no further vouchers are available for registration at this time," the site said.

On the ABC Hobart Facebook page, users reported having difficulty accessing the site as soon as registrations opened.

"9:02 and website crashed," one person wrote, before later confirming they were able to get a voucher.

"Still spinning, spinning and waiting, waiting," wrote another.

It did however suggest more vouchers may be made available.

$1 million in four minutes
Premier Peter Gutwein said about 21,500 vouchers for accommodation and tourism experiences were snapped up, involving between 55,000 and 60,000 Tasmanians.

He called the program a "roaring success," adding more than $1 million worth of vouchers issued in the first four minutes.

"Demand was far in excess of what we thought it would be," he said.

"Tasmanians quite obviously want to get out and visit this beautiful state. I couldn't be happier with how it's going."

Mr Gutwein said the website did not crash, despite lengthy delays experienced by some attempting to access the scheme.

'It's only for rich people' perception
Helen Manser from the Gagebrook Community Centre said not all Tasmanians had equal access to the scheme.

She said many low-income residents did not have access to the internet to secure a voucher, or the money to pay for accommodation upfront before being reimbursed.

"The feedback I received today is that they would love a holiday, they were just too slow, didn't know about it, or didn't have the money upfront," she said.

"It's not necessarily my perception but it certainly is from the community that it's only for rich people.

"It's very inequitable for people on low incomes."

The State Government has not ruled out extending the scheme.

"I'm certain that we might do this again," Mr Gutwein said.

"I certainly think that to support our tourism industry, we should do more."

Voucher scheme to encourage mid-week travel
The scheme was designed to get people travelling around Tasmania mid-week, and offers rebates of between $100 and $150 a night for accommodation for a maximum of two nights depending on eligibility, as well as $50 per person towards tourism experiences.

People will pay and undertake their travel activity, and then claim the value of their vouchers using their receipts for eligible accommodation or an eligible experience.

Tourism Tasmania chief executive John Fitzgerald said he hoped everyone who registered was serious about travelling in the state.

He said the vouchers would need to be monitored to ensure people who successfully registered did use them.

"I'd like to think that people who jump on and get the vouchers are serious about travel. I think we've done our best to explain the scheme to people," he said.

"This is about supporting our regional economies, and our urban economies, and our tourism sector to get them through this difficult time."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/markets ... d=msedgdhp

8 SEPT NZ
#NZhellhole: how Kiwis are hitting back at Trump's Covid taunts
Following comments by Donald Trump that New Zealand was dealing with a “big surge” of new Covid-19 cases, Kiwis have snapped back with some light social media trolling under the hashtag #NZhellhole, which has trended at number two on New Zealand Twitter.

When did this all start?

In mid-August the US President began calling out New Zealand in his campaign speeches, arguing that America wasn’t the only country battling a Covid outbreak. His words on New Zealand’s Auckland cluster – which arose after the country had gone more than 100 days with no community transmission – were derisive. They were also untrue: on the day he first made them, New Zealand recorded nine new cases of Covid-19 while the US reported nearly 42,000.

“The places they were using to hold up, now they’re having a big surge,” Trump said at an airport rally in Mankato, Minnesota. “They were holding up names of countries and now they’re saying whoops!

“Do you see what’s happening in New Zealand? They beat it, they beat it, it was like front-page news because they wanted to show me something,” Trump said.

How did New Zealand respond?

The prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, disputed Trump’s claims and hit back with a barrage of statistics debunking his “big surge” label. She said the situations in the two countries were “not comparable” with just 22 people at the time having died from Covid-19 in New Zealand, compared with more than 170,000 in the US, the highest death toll in the world.

“It’s not just whether you have cases, it’s how you choose to deal with them as a nation, and I am personally very proud of how New Zealanders have taken to the battle with Covid-19,” Ardern said.

New Zealanders jumped on social media and began tweeting images of the country’s renowned beauty, using the ironic hashtag #NZhellhole. People tweeted the Southern Alps, Hobbiton and Milford Sound, as well as more intimate pictures of their spring backyards, local beaches and Fathers’ Day picnics.

Captions took the tone of complaints – tongue firmly in cheek – about the fresh air, lack of traffic, and the birdsong.

How popular has it become – and has Trump noticed?
Thousands of people have joined in, with the hashtag trending repeatedly on New Zealand Twitter in the last month. The enduring popularity of #NZhellhole suggests it may be helping Kiwis enjoy and appreciate their own backyards, with the borders remaining firmly closed and many having to adjust to a more confined and domestic way of life.

There’s no sign yet that Trump has spotted the posts but he has been tagged in many of them.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/nz ... d=msedgdhp
<< Compared with the USA , where the pandemic has been spreading like a forest fire , the riots , the nasty political BS , NZ is paradise and people there are living a great life. >>
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Sep 08, 2020 8:29 am

8 SEPT FEDERAL
NDIS workforce casualisation makes pandemic 'scary'
Australians on the National Disability Insurance Scheme have been scared during the pandemic because having multiple support workers increases the risk of getting coronavirus.

A parliamentary committee looking at the NDIS on Tuesday heard calls for a workforce strategy, flexible pricing structure and improved access to data.

The committee was told the casualisation of the workforce has made it harder for participants to build long-term relationships with support staff, and has increased fears during the pandemic.

People with Disability Australia's Romola Hollywood believes about 40 per cent of the broad NDIS workforce are casual and part-time.

"Supports can be quite fragmented in the way that they're delivered," she said.

"Many people have told us that it's been quite scary through the COVID-19 pandemic to have multiple workers potentially coming in and out of your home."

The committee also heard from University of Sydney and University of NSW researchers who have surveyed NDIS workers.

The research found one-in-five workers believe the NDIS has been positive for them as a worker, and one-in-three believes the NDIS has been positive for participants.

"The more experienced the workers were, the more likely they were to be concerned about service quality compared to new recruits who have not worked in the sector as long," post doctoral fellow Georgia Van Toorn said.

"Workers felt like quality of services had suffered due to problems related to unstable and inconsistent work time arrangements, under-staffing, lack of training and supervision, and unpaid work."

Mental health groups also fronted the inquiry, expressing concern over highly skilled psychosocial support workers moving to other sectors to get better work conditions.

Community Mental Health Australia chief Bill Gye noted the lack of data on worker qualifications, and how difficult that is for planning.

"It would be great if an outcome of the recommendations from this hearing could be that the data is more publicly provided within the limits of confidentiality," he said.

NDIS workers also told the committee they were overworked, stressed, time-poor and weren't given adequate training.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

<< Seems there is no interest to change this on the part of the Federal Government = ticking covid time bomb >>

Aged care workers who are overeas & foreign aged care workers are struggling against coronavirus travel restrictions to return to Australia
Foreign aged care workers are facing confusion about their eligibility to enter Australia, with mixed messages as to whether they have the "critical skills" that qualify them for travel exemptions.

The inconsistency comes as the nation's aged care sector struggles to cope with ever-present workforce shortages, exacerbated by the coronavirus crisis forcing staff to self-isolate to protect vulnerable residents.

One of the carers who has battled to get back to Australia is Spana Nakarmi. She has been working for an aged care facility in South Hobart for the past four years as a highly qualified nursing assistant.

Ms Nakarmi travelled to Nepal earlier this year to briefly care for her sick mother.

"I was just here for like three weeks, but all of a sudden there was a closure of the borders, and I just got stuck here," Ms Nakarmi told the ABC from Kathmandu.

She told the ABC she had been knocked back nine times for a travel exemption to return to Australia, despite having full-time employment and a letter of support from her manager.

That changed, and an exemption was granted, after the ABC contacted the Australian Border Force (ABF) about her case.

Aged care not on 'critical skills' list
There are two lists detailing who can enter Australia. When it comes to aged care, the Priority Migration Skilled Occupation List only includes registered nurses working in the sector, and not other aged care workers.

There is a second register referred to as the "critical skills" list. When the ABC first asked why workers like Ms Nakarmi were not expressly mentioned on that list, publicly available on the ABF website, aged care did not feature.

That later changed and aged care was added to the category of workers "with critical skills required to maintain the supply of essential good and services" alongside those in medical technology, mining and agriculture.

Cached versions of the Australian Border Force's website log show the changes were made, and that "aged care" was omitted as far back as July.

"Aged care is considered a critical sector and travel exemptions have been approved for aged care workers who are able to provide evidence of their employment in this sector," a spokesperson for the ABF said.

This is at odds with Ms Nakarmi's experience of applying to return to Australia. She first applied for a travel exemption in April.

Such applications require letters of support from an employer that vouch for the traveller and outline why they are vital.

Ms Nakarmi's qualifications allow her to supervise other carers, assist nurses with some medical procedures, and administer high-level medications including morphine and fentanyl.

"Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it has been very difficult to cover shifts," Ms Nakarmi's manager wrote to the ABF in late July.

"It has always been difficult to attract staff in aged care based in Tasmania with high-level experience in aged care.

"Having Spana Nakarmi back as a permanent carer and not having to replace her 35 hours a week shift would be a very positive impact on our resident wellbeing."

Her case was brought to the attention of Tasmanian Greens senator Nick McKim, who asked the Department of Home Affair's parliamentary liaisons why her applications had been repeatedly knocked back.

"The onus is on an applicant to satisfy the Australian Border Force that their circumstances come within one of the exemption categories," the response in late August said.

"The ABF has not accepted that her skills come within any of the critical areas highlighted."

Not the only case, Greens say
Senator McKim has been a long-term opponent of the Government's immigration policies.

But he argued this was a matter of common sense, rather than ideology.

"It just beggars belief that when you have a sector in such crisis, and a workforce in such crisis, that the Government's not doing everything it can to bring people to Australia who live and work here to help respond to the pandemic," he said.

Senator McKim maintained Ms Nakarmi's case was not the only example of aged care workers being blocked from travel, including people trying to get back into Victoria, where aged care facilities have been hit hardest by COVID-19 outbreaks and associated staffing shortages.

"Theologians are on the [critical skills] list," he said.

"So if you're a priest, you'll be given permission to come back into Australia.

"This is not about people answering phones or cleaning the floors, this is about highly skilled workers who want to come home and help their colleagues respond to the pandemic and respond to the crisis in aged care."

The ABF said 5,142 people had been granted travel exemptions between the time the nation's borders were closed in March and the end of August, including in the aged care sector.

Ms Nakarmi said she was relieved to have been granted an exemption.

"I am in contact with some of my colleagues, and I've been asking them how [are] three of the residents I was close with," she said.

"They still remember me, who I am. I would ask them, my friends, to say hi to this person and that."

In a statement, Ms Nakarmi's employer, Bupa, confirmed it was in touch with her and had supported her application for an exemption "including letters from Bupa and the South Hobart general manager to help with her application".

More care workers needed to meet future demand
Getting the Federal Government to consider aged care to be a critical skill for the country, not only during the COVID-19 pandemic, has been something organisations such as Aged and Community Services Australia (ACSA) have been lobbying for for some time.

"We know that registered nurses for aged care have been on the list for some time, but we do think that there is a need that we hope is addressed for care workers to also be on that critical skills list," Patricia Sparrow, ACSA's chief executive said.

"When you've got to triple your workforce by 2050, and you're under the pressure that aged care providers have been under through the COVID pandemic, you want to have as many different opportunities and options for workers as possible."

The ABC's request for comment, spurred by Ms Nakarmi's plight, was originally directed at the offices of Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, Acting Immigration Minister Alan Tudge and Aged Care Minister Richard Colbeck.

The response, however, came from the ABF.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Coalition hasn't ruled out rescue flights for Australians stuck overseas, deputy PM tells ABC's Q+A
The federal government has not ruled out organising rescue flights for Australians stuck overseas, the deputy prime minister, Michael McCormack, has said.

Speaking on a combative episode of ABC’s Q+A program on Monday, McCormack said the Australian government was “doing everything we can” to help the 25,000 people stuck overseas return home.

Asked by show’s host, Hamish Macdonald, if that included providing more rescue flights, McCormack said: “Nothing is off the table at the moment. We are considering every option.”


The comment was offered in response to a question from Julia Mickler, whose husband, Andreas, received permission in July to leave Australia to see his dying father in Germany. His return flight was cancelled and he has been unable to get another flight. Mickler’s daughter has Batten disease, an incurable degenerative neurological disorder, and requires a high level of care, which Mickler is struggling to provide on her own.

McCormack said Mickler’s story was “heart-wrenching”.

“There are so many thousands of compassionate cases, yours being one of them,” he said. “We’re doing everything that we can to put those vulnerable people at the front of the queue.”

When another panellist, Labor’s immigration spokeswoman, Kristina Keneally, pointed out that lobsters and crayfish were flown on chartered flights out of Australia to keep the trade going, McCormack interjected that sheep, meat, fruit and vegetables were also chartered out.

“But what do we do for stranded Australians?” Keneally asked. “It is great for trade. Can’t a government do two things at once?”

The businesswoman and former soprano Tania de Jong, was asked about the international border issue and began singing the chorus of I Am Australian. McCormack, not a trained singer, joined in.

The Australian Medical Association’s president, Dr Omar Khorshid, said the cap on international arrivals of 4,000 people a week was arbitrary.

“The size of the hotel quarantine – that’s arbitrary,” Khorshid said. “I think a little bit of compassion is what it is needed here to look after the lives of Australians, and that also means protecting us here in Australia from the virus.”

He said many Australian jurisdictions were clearly pursuing an elimination strategy, with the next two steps being to “get our economy as normal as possible and hope and pray for a vaccine quickly”.

The Perth-based doctor said borders, both international and domestic, have served to protect people “and can’t be discarded because they are inconvenient”, and added that Western Australia’s premier, Mark McGowan, who broke from national cabinet on the issue of border closures, is “our most popular leader ever”.

For domestic borders to reopen, Khorshid said, state governments would need to “trust in other states’ arrangements, in other states’ contact tracing”.

“If one state does the wrong thing, the rest of the country gets let down,” he said. At the moment, I don’t see that trust there.”

McCormack, asked if other jurisdictions can trust Victoria, said: “We have’t been able to so far.”

Related: 'Shattered, heartbroken, financially ruined': stranded Australians plead for help

He said the international arrivals cap was based off figures provided by the states of how many new arrivals they could manage each week in hotel quarantine. It has been in place since Melbourne stopped accepting international flights in the wake of failures in Victoria’s hotel quarantine scheme.

He attempted to attribute part of the second wave to the Black Lives Matter protest in Melbourne but was rebutted by Macdonald. Victorian health authorities have said that although six people who attended the rally tested positive for the virus at a later date, there was no evidence of transmission at the rally.

Prof Kim Rubenstein, a legal scholar at Australian National University who brought a copy of the constitution to the panel, said the pandemic “has really amplified some of the structural problems that we have in our constitution”.

She said there was no reference in it to Australian citizenship or citizenship rights. The legal framework for the international border closure is based on the Biosecurity Act, with decision-making powers delegated back to Australian Border Force.

“The policy may not be clear enough or transparent enough for people to be able to follow in a way that is consistent,” she said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack under fire on Q+A over Black Lives Matter comments and Australians stuck overseas
Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack came under fire during Monday night's episode of Q+A after linking Black Lives Matter protests to Victoria's coronavirus dilemma, as the Government was criticised for failing Australians stranded overseas.

Shadow Home Affairs Minister Kristina Keneally said the Federal Government had done more for seafood exports than the 25,000 Australians the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) says are trying to return home.

DFAT estimates that around 3,500 of those Australians are in vulnerable situations.

Nationals leader Mr McCormack said the Government was limited in terms of the number of people it could fly home and get into quarantine, but that didn't placate the former NSW premier.

"Is there any more Australian value than [to] look after your mates?" Senator Keneally asked.

"There is a lot more that could be done — yes, there is a weekly cap of 4,000 [people, but] it is not at capacity, and it hasn't been at capacity.

"There are only four cities where international flights are currently allowed to arrive — why aren't we using Darwin or Gold Coast or Canberra where we could have international airports?"

Mr McCormack deflected, saying the problem of returning Australians home "has been exacerbated by states closing their borders".

Senator Keneally was having none of that.

"This Government was very quick to put in place a plan to ship seafood out of the country," she said.

"If you are a lobster or a crayfish, you get a chartered flight out of Australia.

"We spent $350 million and 1,800 chartered flights taking our seafood out of Australia — that is great for seafood trade, but what have we done for stranded Australians?

"How many chartered flights? None."

Host Hamish Macdonald asked if the Government was considering more rescue flights — like the ones out of Wuhan in the early stages of the pandemic. Mr McCormack said "all options" were on the table.

Fellow panellist, Australian Medical Association President Omar Khorshid, said more could be done for Australians stranded overseas, labelling Government policy "arbitrary".

"The Government could do something right now, if it really wanted to," Dr Khorshid said.

"The 4,000 caps … that is an arbitrary number, the size of the hotel quarantine, that's arbitrary.

"I think a little bit of compassion is what it is needed here to look after the lives of Australians, and that also means protecting us here in Australia from the virus."

But Dr Khorshid also praised the Government on border restrictions and hotel quarantine.

"Don't take what I said as not being supportive of hotel quarantine. It is the one most successful measure that protected the country from the virus," he said.

"We need the border restrictions, we need the hotel quarantine but the Government can look after Australians at the same time."

Mr McCormack said the caps on numbers were dictated by states.

"We have allowed the premiers to actually give us the number that they felt comfortable, that they could manage and maintain, whilst making sure that the integrity of the quarantine system was what it needs to be so that we don't get more community transmission," he said.

Deputy PM accused of 'Trumpism'
Australia's biggest coronavirus caseload is in Victoria but the state came under fire on Monday, with Prime Minister Scott Morrison calling for Daniel Andrews' State Government to fast-track its coronavirus roadmap.

Other premiers have also resisted federal pressure to open borders, particularly Western Australia's Mark McGowan and Queensland's Annastacia Palaszczuk.

After Dr Khorshid discussed the benefits of borders remaining closed, Mr McCormack was asked if other states could trust Victoria's contact tracing, given the large outbreak there.

"Let's wait and see," he said.

"We have had that outbreak because of the security guards, who did the wrong thing.

"We had that outbreak because of a family who gathered in too large a number. We had the outbreak in Victoria because of a [Black Lives Matter] protest rally."

Macdonald immediately challenged him, asking: "What's the evidence of the protest rally leading to the outbreak?"

Mr McCormack replied: "There were three confirmed cases from one of those protest rallies."

But Macdonald said the Deputy PM was drawing a link not substantiated in fact, and, after evidence of this was presented, was asked if he accepted what he said was wrong.

"No, I don't. I don't think people should be protesting actually at the moment … that can't have helped," Mr McCormack said.

AMA President Dr Khorshid said he was not aware of any evidence linking the BLM protest to Victoria's outbreak, and then Senator Keneally got stuck in.

"I'm gobsmacked about what I heard from the Deputy Prime Minister," she said.

"Trying to assert that this second wave in Victoria is linked directly to the Black Lives Matter protest… I mean, that is an alternative fact, Trumpism, make up your own reality."

Senator Keneally then launched an attack on the Federal Government's COVIDSafe app.

"You know what would help the contact tracing in Victoria? If we had an app that worked," she said.

"This COVIDSafe app was supposed to be our ticket from freedom, our way out. It hasn't yet found one unique contact that wasn't found by manual tracking and tracing.

"The New South Wales Opal Card has done a better job at tracking coronavirus than this COVID app.

"And what I'm frustrated by here is that we have a Commonwealth Government that is responsible for the app, responsible for aged care and mental health and yet all I've heard is, 'we're working on it'.

"There is no clear strategy or plan here in place."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12574
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Tue Sep 08, 2020 8:29 am

8 SEPTEMBER DATA

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No covid19 cases hospitalised in SA, Tas, NT, ACT

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CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12574
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Sep 09, 2020 6:48 am

9 SEPT VICTORIA

Victoria recorded 76 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, sparking fears a declining 14-day average isn’t on the horizon.
Victoria recorded another day of double-digit coronavirus infections on Wednesday, with just 76 new cases across the state.
The Department of Health and Human Services confirmed there have been 76 new coronavirus cases and 11 deaths in the past 24 hours.

It comes after the state reported 55 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, 41 new cases on Monday, 63 on Sunday and 76 on Saturday.
A further 11 deaths have also been announced, taking the state's death toll to 694.

The figures are a marked jump from previous days after the state recorded 55 infections on Tuesday and 41 on Monday - the lowest number in two months.
The rise comes after Premier Daniel Andrews unveiled his road map out of Stage Four restrictions - leaving many businesses devastated.

In order to move to the next step of easing restrictions on September 28, Melbourne must record an average daily infection rate between 30 and 50 over the next two weeks.

To progress to the next phase of Premier Daniel Andrews’ roadmap to easing restrictions, the 14-day average increase in new cases must be between 30 and 50 by September 28.

On Tuesday, Melbourne’s 14-day coronavirus case average fell below 80 as the state enlisted NSW help to boost its contact tracing efforts.
Previously, epidemiologist Adrian Esterman had predicted Victoria should be down to 20 cases a day in two weeks if the downward trend continued.

Figures released on Tuesday show almost a third of Victoria’s new coronavirus cases were coming from the postcode 3020.

The postcode, which covers Sunshine, Albion, Glengala, Sunshine North, Sunshine West recorded 16 of the 55 new coronavirus invections in Victoria on Tuesday.

n the coming weeks, five suburban contract tracing response units will be set up to swoop on local coronavirus outbreaks.

Victoria has also sent a team of contact tracers to NSW to learn from their experience in tracing and containing the virus.

Andrews said “pouncing on outbreaks” had proven as a successful strategy in the regions and the suburban response teams would provide “the very beat and localised response”.

https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/health-w ... -c-1301687

Andrews denies Victoria COVID-19 strategy has shifted to 'eradication strategy'
Premier Daniel Andrews has labelled criticisms he has shifted Victoria's COVID-19 approach from a suppression strategy to an eradication strategy "nonsense".

The Victorian Premier defended his approach claiming it was agreed upon by the National Cabinet that "very low, to no mystery cases" would be a crucial component of dealing with the virus.
"In order to have confidence you can keep numbers low for the long term, you need to get numbers low, as low as you possibly can to have confidence," Mr Andrews said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Andrews 'not interested' in politics of COVID-19
Daniel Andrews says he will speak to the prime minister about the future of JobKeeper and JobSeeker for Victorians and says politics “is of no use” in the fight against COVID-19.

“I will be having some conversations with the Prime Minister later on this week and it is best that I have those conversations with him rather than broadcasting my message,” Mr Andrews said.

“I don’t think that necessarily achieves anything. I am not interested in, at all, at all in the politics of this. I am just not. It doesn’t work. It doesn’t work. Politics is of no use in the fight against this virus.That has always been my view and that won’t be changing.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


Victoria records just 76 new coronavirus cases as economy suffers
The rise comes after Premier Daniel Andrews unveiled his road map out of Stage Four restrictions - leaving many businesses devastated.In order to move to the next step of easing restrictions on September 28, Melbourne must record an average daily infection rate between 30 and 50 over the next two weeks.

Cafes, bars and restaurants will not be able to have customers dine outside until October 26, as long as the statewide case average has fallen under five for the previous fortnight.

Customers won't be allowed inside until November 23 and only if there have been no cases at all for the previous two weeks.

The strict draconian curfew enforced in Melbourne will be also be extended to October 26 but will be increased to 9pm-5am. Currently it begins at 8pm.

Retail shops are also expected to open their doors from October 26 along with hairdressers under strict safety measures.

Public gatherings will also increase to ten people. More restrictions will ease from November 23 including public gatherings jumping to 50 people, 20 visitors at a home and groups of 20 people inside venues.

New modelling has predicted the extension of Melbourne's lockdown could destroy another 260,000 jobs in Victoria on top of the 432,000 already lost.

The Institute of Public Affairs, a free market think tank, has predicted the extended lockdown would cost Victorians 260,000 jobs between September 14 and November 23, with another 4,000 jobs set to be lost during the following week.

'Daniel Andrews is crushing jobs, small business, and the spirit of mainstream Victorians with continued lockdown measures,' IPA research fellow Cian Hussey said.

'He has disfigured Victoria with more lockdowns to deal with the second wave unleashed by his catastrophic ineptitude with hotel quarantine and contact tracing.' The IPA calculated the first lockdown in March and the reintroduction of stricter, Stage Four measures in August would cost 696,000 jobs in eight months - including the 432,000 already lost, based on weekly, Australian Bureau of Statistics payroll data.

The Reserve Bank of Australia is already expecting the national jobless rate to hit ten per cent by the end of 2020, a level unseen since 1994.

The IPA calculated total and expected job losses from the extended, temporary shutdowns were 'equivalent to 21 per cent of the Victorian workforce'.

More details on Wednesday's cases are expected be revealed in a press conference.

There are currently 18 active cases linked to the Frankston Hospital and 12 infections linked to Vawdrey Australia Truck Manufacturer.

Fifteen cases are associated with Bulla Dairy Foods in Colac and 13 infections linked to Dandenong Police Station.

The average daily case number in Melbourne was at 78.6 on Tuesday.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Woolworths closed after positive case in Melbourne
A Woolworths at a major shopping centre in Melbourne's south-east has closed after a worker tested positive to COVID-19.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Melbourne hospitality owners say Victoria's roadmap out of coronavirus lockdown is not practical
A plan to help Melbourne's hospitality businesses ease out of lockdown by making outdoor dining easier has been criticised as "useless", as some publicans choose to shut up shop for good.

Tracey Dean, who owns the the Morning Star Hotel in Williamstown, said Melbourne's roadmap towards COVID-normal was "the last straw".

"We had hung on by the skin of our teeth," she said.

"We had no rent relief, we have been in negotiations since March."

Ms Dean said if she had continued operating the business would have been in a "serious financial pickle".

"The banks won't look at us at the moment. We haven't made money since February," she said.

"We would have had to go into personal debt with friends and family to keep us afloat."

President of the Victorian branch of the Australian Hotels Association, David Canny, told the ABC he was flooded with calls from pub owners in the 24 hours after Melbourne's roadmap was announced.

He said more pubs were likely to fold before the end of the year.

"Some don't want to come out and say anything because they are emotional and want to look after their staff," he said.

Business owners say outdoor dining idea will not help
Mr Andrews said on Sunday he hoped local councils would help make alfresco dining a reality for cafes, pubs and restaurants when restrictions on outdoor dining would be lifted under the third step of the roadmap planned for October 26.

"If you look at some cities around the world, the kerbside car parking is gone, the footpath has been restricted, they have put plastic dividers between tables and they are seating more people outside than they could ever put inside. We are looking at all of that," Mr Andrews said.

The City of Melbourne announced last week it would adopt a similar plan to New York City's open restaurants policy that allows hospitality venues to use the footpath and laneways adjacent to their establishment to serve customers and ensure maximum social distancing.

Other municipalities have also come on board with Yarra, Darebin, Glen Eira, Port Phillip and Moonee Valley councils all confirming they would roll out policies allowing businesses to use areas such as car parks and laneways and even whole streets to serve customers.

Caterina Borsato, owner of Caterina's Cucina E Bar in Melbourne's CBD, said the idea was "useless" for her basement restaurant.

Ms Borsato said because the CBD was laid like a grid, little sunlight hit alleyways during the day, meaning businesses would have to fork out thousands for heaters and covers.

"It's not practical. There's a cost to making this work and we have no money coming in," she said.

Ms Borsato's restaurant is in Queen Street, a street she said was regularly filled with buses.

"It's noisy and it's not private and the footpaths won't be wide enough for my sort of dining," she said.

"It's all very idealistic, but we need something concrete and we need to give hospitality some sort of hope. The CBD is a disaster."

She said a more practical solution would be to allow restaurants to open indoors sooner with a lower cap such as 10 diners.

Publican says Melbourne's weather makes idea impractical
Manager of the Grosvenor Hotel in St Kilda East, Frank Chilelli, said the idea was great in theory but was not practical.

"For us and a lot of old pubs that were never really set up for outdoor dining this is not an option.

"The Government needs to let us open up, just open our doors and let us serve people. We can do it safely," he said.

Mr Chilelli's pub is located on a busy six-lane road and he said opening on the footpath just would not work.

"They might be able to change legislation and let us use our carpark but we're not set up for that, the carpark is at the back and logistically being able to serve people there would be a lot of work, it's not practical," he said.

"And let's face it, we're in Victoria, we're not in Queensland where you can bank on seven days of sun, we know what Victoria is like; beautiful one day and disastrous the next minute."

Mr Chilelli said financing an outdoor service would also be a major hurdle and meant the whole idea was "just silly".

"We are already struggling from a financial aspect, to go ahead and invest more capital into an outdoor dining area isn't worth it for 28 days, I don't see the sense in this."

'Why would you invest thousands of dollars ... for just 28 days?'
Restaurant and Catering Association head Wes Lambert agreed and said the idea was expensive and unlikely to help any business increase revenue.

He said, according to Melbourne's roadmap, hospitality businesses could open up outside on October 26 if daily case thresholds were met, but 28 days later (if thresholds were met) indoor dining would be allowed to begin.

"So why would you invest thousands of dollars for tables and heaters, etc, to move your business outside if it wasn't already outside, for just 28 days?

"It is great for businesses that already have outdoor seating — they can take on more revenue without more costs which is great but it doesn't mean much for larger and medium venues especially in the CBD that have no access to outdoor dining."

Mr Lambert said the association was lobbying for exemptions to be made to businesses that had zero access to outdoor dining to be allowed indoor dining.

Other business owners have been more optimistic.

Michael Vass is the co-owner of Curry Cafe in High Street, Northcote and said it was a good idea if it meant venues could increase capacity.

"I think that's awesome, that's great. For others, it will be awesome and for the morale of the community it will be great," he said.

Mr Vass's restaurant already has a few outdoor tables and he said all the indoor furniture would be moved outside to save on costs.

But reopening was still risky, he said, and would cost close to $10,000.

"We have grants which are awesome but we have to decide when we use it, do we use it now or do we wait? What if we open and have to close again?"

But either way, he said the news was "good to hear" and provided hope.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


Burning questions: why has the pandemic hit so much harder in Victoria?
As most of Australia enjoys the lead-up to summer, Victorians will still be locked down until late October. And while the Andrews government hopes a cautious reopening will mean the state can have a close to normal, virus-free Christmas, there are still plenty of frustrating, unanswered questions about how the hell Victoria landed in such a mess.
Is NSW better at contact tracing?
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has lauded NSW as the “gold standard” in contact tracing. Its highly efficient and quick test and trace system has been praised for helping keep new case numbers at a manageable level.

Victoria, meanwhile, has been criticised for an underfunded and ill-resourced contact tracing team, which was quickly swamped when cases began growing exponentially in Melbourne, and has been playing catch-up on huge backlogs ever since.

But are the two states really that different? ABC health reporter Norman Swan told ABC News Breakfast yesterday: “NSW isn’t the gold standard. NSW is lucky.”

University of NSW Kirby Institute head of biosecurity Raina MacIntyre writes that critics of the Victorian system overlook the fact that the process of contact tracing in both states is the same. The difference is the number of cases Victoria’s team had to deal with.

“If NSW were facing 700 cases a day, it would be in a similar situation to Victoria,” MacIntyre said.

And because NSW hasn’t had to deal with such high case numbers, we don’t know whether the system is that much better than Victoria’s, said Grattan Institute health program director Stephen Duckett.

But he also suspects NSW system is more successful because of the more detailed public data about cases and their movements its Health Department has been able to provide.

“They have consistently, over a longer period of time, been publishing data on how effective they are, and how quickly they contact cases … Because they are publishing that on the web, I suspect they’ve been using that information themselves. They jump on it when things are going awry.”

Finally, there are structural differences. For decades, successive Victorian governments stripped funds from public health — the state spends less on public health than any other.

And unlike Victoria, where public health has always been centralised, NSW follows a devolved model where it is managed in 15 local health districts. That model allows teams with a knowledge of the local area to do the tracing, something Victoria is now trying to emulate.

Is the modelling wrong?
Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews justified his conservative approach to easing restrictions by pointing to modelling which suggested easing up too quickly would be likely to put Victoria back in lockdown by Christmas.

But there’s been plenty of criticism of that modelling. Speaking to Crikey yesterday, Deakin University epidemiology chair Catherine Bennett said the modellers didn’t provide enough transparency around the parameters used or the questions asked by the government.

Today we got a little more detail on what the modelling didn’t factor in.

According to The Age, the model’s projections relied on outdated assumptions about Victoria’s contact tracing capacity. And speaking to ABC Radio National Breakfast this morning, the University of Melbourne’s Jason Thompson, one of the model’s developers, said it did not factor in local data — it didn’t consider the fact that most cases were happening in settings like health and aged care.

Can’t we just lockdown the hotspots?
In regional Victoria, the daily case average is now under five. Several local government areas in the regions have gone weeks without a case, and conservative politicians don’t want the whole state bound by Melbourne’s rules.

While regional Victoria is under looser restrictions, there are still limits on gatherings and restaurants until September 13.

But within greater Melbourne a localised plan which ring-fences “hotspot” postcodes hasn’t had great success — Victoria tried that approach in late June. Within a week all Melbourne was locked down.

“We saw from the early stages that ring-fencing postcodes in Melbourne didn’t work,” says Duckett.

We also can’t isolate hotspot settings, like aged care and health workers, because as Duckett points out, those workers mingled in the community, caught the virus and brought it in.

Why did hotel quarantine fail?
Good question. It’s still the topic of a wide-ranging inquiry now in its final days. So far, the hearings have exposed a shambolic system that let the virus get out. For months, nobody really knew who was in charge — responsibility seemed to bounce between health, employment and the police.

Infection control was inadequate and responsibility was placed on private security contractors who were often recruited via WhatsApp, given scant training and told to bring their own PPE.

And while there was criticism of guards’ poor behaviour, nobody has been able to work out who decided to use them.

The post Burning questions: why has the pandemic hit so much harder in Victoria? appeared first on Crikey.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Victorian government to make 'aggressive ( sensible ) changes' around al fresco dining
Melbourne hospitality venues may be allowed to increase al fresco dining availability under new government measures to assist businesses reopening.

Daniel Andrews flagged restaurants, cafes and pubs may be able to seat patrons on the sidewalk or
Melbourne hospitality venues may be allowed to increase al fresco dining availability under new government measures to assist businesses reopening.

Daniel Andrews flagged restaurants, cafes and pubs may be able to seat patrons on the sidewalk or in parks in an effort to boost capacity whilst adhering to the health advice.

“We are going to make some pretty aggressive decisions about freeing up as much space as possible,” Mr Andrews said.

“So I would just say to business, it’s not like only those who have got a very limited number of tables out the front today … that’s the only space you’ll have.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Victorian working permits to be resubmitted ahead of expirating.
Victorians holding working permits will need to reapply for their exemptions again as expiry dates loom.

Premier Daniel Andrews revealed on Wednesday permits for employees working on site would not just roll over and employers will be required to resubmit the application.

He said employers would be able to use the same template for the new permit but would have to alter the dates.

“They need to be contemporary and represent who is working and the circumstances under which they are working so police have the clearest and easiest sense of who should be out and about, who can be out and about after curfew,” Mr Andrews said.
“Therefore they need to be remade.

“We have tried to reduce the administrative burden as much as possible but if those permits are going to be accurate and effective, particularly for the purposes of curfew, they do need to be reissued.”

Childcare permits, however, will not have to be renewed as a date was not issued concurrent with the exemption.

The Premier also flagged permits for childcare would potentially be unnecessary in a few weeks if Melbourne was to successfully move to the next step, which would see childcare centres allowed to reopen.

The state recorded 11 new deaths overnight, nine of which were linked to the troubled aged care sector, with 76 new infections.

The Premier thanked regional Victoria for its testing efforts as the caseload outside of metropolitan Melbourne continued to drop, despite reporting seven new cases in the past 24-hour period.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

AFL avoids heavy club membership hit
Essendon, Sydney and Melbourne have suffered alarming membership drop-offs but the AFL's overall club membership numbers remain relatively stable in a season affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
The Bombers' tally dropped from 84,237 in 2019 to 66,686 in 2020 - a reduction of 17,551 - while Sydney's total fell by 13,590 and Melbourne's was reduced by 11,850.

Eleven of the AFL's 18 clubs recorded membership drop-offs, while the league-wide tally dropped 6.1 per cent from 2019's record total of 1,057,572 to 992,854 members in 2020.

A drop-off had been expected, given the season suspension, minimal games in Victoria and the majority of fixtures being played in front of either no crowd or limited numbers and AFL chief executive Gillon McLachlan lauded the high retention rate.

"Footy is about connection and a sense of belonging and this remarkable number demonstrates AFL members are the most passionate and loyal members across all sports," McLachlan said.

"The commitment members made to their clubs is a key reason why all 18 clubs were able to survive a challenging and unprecedented year.

"We have been blown away by the loyalty and commitment footy fans around the country have demonstrated this season."

Despite the challenging season, five clubs broke their records - West Coast (100,776 members), Carlton (67,035), St Kilda (48,588), GWS (30,841) and Gold Coast (16,236) - while Brisbane and Fremantle also increased their memberships

The Eagles joined Richmond in passing the 100,000 member mark and leapfrogged the Tigers to reach the top of the standings - and become the first non-Victorian club to achieve that feat.

AFLW membership numbers, which were largely unaffected by COVID-19, increased 48.9 per cent to 20,849 off the back of the league's expansion.

The official AFL club membership tally was compiled after an August 31 deadline.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/sport/afl/afl ... d=msedgdhp

REQIONAL
Traces of COVID-19 found in Apollo Bay
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Health officials are probing a possible outbreak in the Apollo Bay area after traces of COVID-19 was found in the sewerage system.

Wastewater testing is being rolled out across 25 sites in Victoria after the Department of Health and Human Services Testing Commander Jeroen Weimar revealed traces of the coronavirus was found in the Apollo Bay water catchment."On September 1 we picked up the first positive sign of some traces of coronavirus in the Apollo Bay water catchment and we picked it up again a second time on September 5," Mr Weimar said.

Melbourne Water's Nick Crosby told media someone had "excreted coronavirus at some stage" in the catchment, affirming the method for detection was "well-validated".

"It starts principally in the bathroom, right. Many people who are infected will excrete in their stool. It can also be washed off their hands or if they’re using tissues, they might discard them in the toilet," he said.

"Then there is the timing issue. If there is one person in a catchment, then the sewerage makes its way to the treatment plant, and then you have to sample it at a certain time to detect that."

People in the Apollo Bay area are being urged to come forward for testing.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

600 workers lose their jobs at meatworks factory
Almost 600 workers at Australia's largest meat processing facility have lost their jobs as the company scales back its operations due to plummeting profits during the pandemic.

The job cuts at JBS Dinmore in Ipswich, which is the largest meat factor in the southern hemisphere, comes after the company failed to convince Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg to make a JobKeeper exemption.

The company does not qualify for the scheme as its turnover has only dropped 40 per cent this year, and not the 50 per cent required by large businesses.

Bosses blamed JobKeeper for creating an 'inequity' in the market, with some companies propped up by handouts and others struggling to make ends meet.

JBS Australia chief executive officer Brent Eastwood said it hadn't been an easy decision, but bosses had been left with little alternative.

'Already facing a severe livestock supply shortage following an extended period of drought, the COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted the Dinmore business,' he told the Courier Mail.

'The situation has been further exacerbated by the market inequity created by the Federal Government's JobKeeper program.

'The market conditions mean there will be no work for around 600 full time jobs for the foreseeable future.'

The pandemic has wreaked havoc on the company over the past few months, with shifts at the factory cut by 40 per cent and 1,700 workers stood down with no pay for two weeks.

Due to the tumultuous few months, workers have lost more than 70 shifts this year and are classed as daily hire, meaning the minimum period of notice for termination is one day.

Australasian Meat Industry Employees Union and Blair MP Shayne Neumann said it was one of the saddest cases Ipswich had ever seen.

'It's catastrophic for the Ipswich community and it's devastating for these local workers and families.'

Smaller companies, those with an annual turnover of less than $1billion, must show their their turnover has fallen by 30 per cent to qualify.

For bigger companies making $1billion or more annually, this must have dropped by 50 per cent.

In statement JBS cited a range of issues, including COVID-19, extended drought conditions and a severe livestock supply shortage.

The company had also been heavily critical of the Federal Government's JobKeeper Program, which it claimed had created inequality in the meat processing sector and contributed to today's decision, as well as .

Under JobKeeper eligibility criteria, companies with more than $1 billion in revenue must show a 50 per cent drop in turnover, while companies earning less than that amount are required to demonstrate a 30 per cent fall in income.

JBS said the action to scale back operations would allow it to preserve 1,150 full time jobs at Dinmore and protect "the long-term future of our Dinmore facility and other Queensland beef processing operations."

Silent nights
Australiasian Meat Industry Employees Union Queensland branch secretary Matt Journeaux said the night shift would be stood down indefinitely from September 21.

He said JobKeeper had allowed smaller processors to pay more for cattle and keep their shifts.

"Unfortunately, it's a perfect storm," Mr Journeaux said.

"But the playing field has been tilted to those plants receiving JobKeeper.

"Some large meat processors using third party labour hire companies have been receiving JobKeeper and passing those savings onto their host."

'Distortion' and 'devastation'
The Federal Member for Blair, Shayne Neumann, said the job losses would be catastrophic for the Ipswich economy and for the families involved.

"It's one of the worst days we've had for years," he said.

"JBS is our largest private employer.

"My first job in life was to work at Dinmore as a cleaner, my uncle worked there, my cousins worked there, and my father worked there.

"I am just devastated for these people."

Mr Neumann also blamed the Federal Government's JobKeeper program for the job losses.

"The Government is effectively providing JobKeeper to labour hire companies who are producing labour at a cheaper rate into other meat processing plants," he said.

"So those processing plants can bid higher for cattle.

"This is a distortion of competition — it's driven up prices, they're outbidding JBS.

"The margins are already compressed in the industry and the market imbalance has resulted in a poor outcome for these JBS employees.

"I throw this at the feet of the Federal Government, they should do the right thing."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

BREACHES
Police probe Melbourne 'freedom walk'
Melbourne is bracing for another anti-lockdown protest, with more than 1000 supporters drummed up for a planned "freedom walk" amid stage four COVID-19 restrictions.
After violent anti-lockdown protests at the Shrine of Remembrance and surrounding areas on the weekend, some 1100 Facebook users have signalled their commitment to walk the Royal Botanic Gardens' Tan track this Saturday.

The "freedom walk" claims to be legal and asks citizens to "come together, get healthy and talk about getting our freedoms back".

In a statement on Wednesday, Victoria Police said it was aware of the event and is monitoring the potential protest activity.

"We are currently making a number of enquiries in relation to this and remain in the process of planning our operational response," the statement said.

"It remains very clear that under stage four restrictions protest activity cannot occur, with any individual deliberately and blatantly breaching the chief health officer's directives liable for a fine of $1,652."

Four men were arrested and charged with incitement in the lead-up to last Saturday's Freedom Day rally in Melbourne, as about 200 people gathered at the shrine and Albert Park.

Violent scuffles between protesters and police broke out, resulting in police arresting 17 people and handing out at least 180 fines.
<< More people will be fined as identified , as they should , as they are openly engaging in health sabotage and should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law >>

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp

Another illegal anti lockdown (pandemic health sabotage) protest "rally" planned - Hundreds say they'll walk the Tan in latest anti-lockdown protest
More than a thousand anti-lockdown protesters have said they will join a "Freedom Walk" on the Tan this Saturday after last weekend's clashes between demonstrators and police.

Police confirmed on Wednesday that they are monitoring the potential protest, promoted on Facebook as the "Melbourne Freedom Walk".

An organiser, Tony Pecora, is an anti-vaxxer and conspiracy theorist dropped by Clive Palmer as his party's candidate for the seat of Melbourne at the last federal election.

Organisers claim the event will be undertaken legally and is merely a forum to allow Victorians to "come together, get healthy and talk about getting our freedoms back".
<< yet they have not sort permission from the high court of Victoria, from the Premiers dept , the Health Department or the Police to do so and it's extremely unlikely permission would be forthcoming >>.
More than 1300 people have indicated that they are either interested in attending or plan to attend the protest at the running track that encircles Melbourne's Royal Botanic Gardens.

The page promoting the event claims the walk is legal, but does not elaborate on whether it conflicts with stage four restrictions still in place in Melbourne.

It would be "a legal walk, allowing citizens to come together, get healthy and talk about getting our freedoms back", organisers wrote.

The only people allowed to exercise on the Tan under stage four rules are those who live within five kilometres of the walking track and then for no more than an hour. Police say any protest would be illegal under the current restrictions.

"Victoria Police is aware [of] and monitoring potential protest activity planned for this weekend," a spokeswoman said.

"We are currently making a number of inquiries in relation to this and remain in the process of planning our operational response.

"It remains very clear that under stage four restrictions protest activity cannot occur, with any individual deliberately and blatantly breaching the Chief Health Officer's directives liable for a fine of $1652."

Organsier Mr Pecora said the march had been designed to comply with the directives.

"This Freedom Walk is geared toward residents that live within five kilometres of Melbourne," said Mr Pecora, who wants Melbourne to "reset" back to what the laws were before COVID-19 restrictions were introduced, and policies that allow "everybody to take responsibility for their own health".

"Social distancing will be adhered to, along with facial coverings, and the aim is to remain walking so as not to create a conflict with police," he said.

"This is an effort to win hearts and minds, and conflict is the last thing we want.

"This walk will happen every week. Same time, same place. We expect more than 15,000 people this Saturday, and hopefully it doubles week on week."

Mr Pecora is an anti-vaxxer who was dropped by Clive Palmer as the United Australia Party's candidate for the seat of Melbourne in the 2019 federal election over his views on various conspiracy theories, including relating to the September 11 attacks.

Police estimated about 200 people gathered at the Shrine of Remembrance late on Saturday morning after people used social media to tout "Freedom Day" rallies across the country.

About 100 police were in and around the Shrine early in the day. Mounted officers were used to move the crowd on about midday amid chants of "Dictator Dan" and "Let the kids live".

Before last Saturday's protest, police said they would arrest people they suspected of "inciting" people to attend.

Assistant Commissioner Luke Cornelius had said that the force would not tolerate "bat ***** crazy" anti-coronavirus theories and warned people planning to attend protests that their feet "won't touch the ground" before they were arrested.

Last Wednesday officers arrested pregnant Ballarat woman Zoe Buhler and charged her with incitement over a Facebook post in which she encouraged people to attend a rally.

The young mother was handcuffed in front of her children while telling police she would remove the post. Lawyers and civil liberty groups have since raised concerns about the way she was arrested.

On Friday police arrested James Bartolo, the moderator of conspiracy group the Conscious Truth Network, at his home in Taylors Hill.

Bartolo live-streamed his arrest after police arrived with a search warrant and knocked his front door in.

The 27-year-old was charged with incitement, possession of prohibited weapons and two counts of resisting police.
Police arrested 17 people at a gathering on Saturday that began at the Shrine of Remembrance and moved on to Albert Park Lake. After that event, protesters vowed to continue taking to the streets in defiance of coronavirus restrictions.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp
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Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Sep 09, 2020 8:20 am

9 SEPT NSW



Coronavirus alert issued for high-end restaurant China Doll in Sydney's Woolloomooloo
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The state recorded nine new cases of COVID-19 overnight.

Here's what you need to know this morning.

High-end Sydney restaurant closed
A health alert has been issued for award-winning restaurant China Doll in Woolloomooloo after a person with COVID-19 visited last week.

NSW Health said the infectious person dined at the waterfront spot on Thursday, September 3, and a small number of patrons and staff were considered close contacts.

They have been directed to self-isolate and seek testing.

Other people who visited the venue that evening should monitor for symptoms until September 17.

Dancing and mingling rules
It's the antithesis of social distancing — but coronavirus restrictions on dancing and intermingling could soon be about to change.

Just over six weeks ago, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian insisted there would be "no singing, no mingling, no dancing" as she tightened rules for weddings and hospitality venues.

But earlier this week, NSW Health said it was looking at safe ways to allow dancing and mingling.

So what would a COVID-safe dancefloor look like?

Berejiklian won't bow to pressure over koalas
NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said she would not allow Nationals MPs to change the draft koala protection policy, despite mounting pressure.

On Monday, the Deputy Premier and Nationals Leader John Barilaro wrote to the Premier asking her to hold an unscheduled meeting to discuss changes next week ahead of parliamentary sittings.

The Nationals MPs want changes made to the draft koala protection policy because they're concerned it will limit clearing of trees and building on farms.

At least two Nationals MPs are considering moving to the crossbench if the policy isn't altered.

Doctor Who saves Sydney retailer
A Sydney retailer has survived the coronavirus pandemic thanks to a unique line of products: small plastic Doctor Who figurines.

The Who Central shop in Sydney's north west has seen record sales in recent weeks, selling out of most products and propping up its picture-framing operation in the shop next door.

The owner's partner Mark Anstis said figurine sales rose 14-fold between January and July.

iCare chair steps down
The chair of the troubled state insurer icare has quit and will be replaced by former Labor leader John Robertson.

Michael Carapiet has been the chair of the board since icare was created in 2015 and has stood down before his tenure was complete.

NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet has been under pressure to sack the board over allegations of mismanagement and systemic underpayment of workers in the compensation scheme.

The Treasurer ordered a statutory review into the scheme and an audit of his office into icare paying the salary of two of his staff, with the findings released today.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/sy ... d=msedgdhp

Graph shows why next week 'CRUCIAL' in NSW's fight against COVID-19
Image
A worrying graph shows New South Wales is teetering on the edge of another coronavirus outbreak, according to an expert, as it's revealed Victoria's extended lockdown could wipe $6billion off the economy.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison this week said the quality of contact tracing in NSW - which recorded nine new cases on Tuesday - was the nation's 'gold standard'.

But World Health Organisation adviser and Professor of Epidemiology at the University of NSW Professor Mary-Louise McLaws on Tuesday shared a reminder 14-day case totals in New South Wales are trending upwards.

The state's average daily change in cumulative case numbers over a two-week period is 2.5 cases in the positive - a level similar to late July.
By comparison the average daily change in cumulative case numbers in Victoria sits at minus 150 cases as of Monday.

'Next week is critical in NSW to see if another surge is coming,' Professor McLaws wrote on Twitter.

'Wear a mask and continue good public health practices.'

KPMG analysis has meanwhile warned an increasing number of Victorian businesses are expected to fold after being forced to stay closed for up to two months as part of Premier Daniel Andrews' controversial road map out of Stage Four restrictions.

An estimated 350,000 workers are expected to be made jobless in the three months to the end of September on top of the 250,000 jobs already lost to the pandemic, The Australian reported.

KPMG Chief Economist Brendan Rynne said the second lockdown 'compounded' the damage done by shutdowns in April and May.

'The likelihood is the downturn in economic activity in Victoria is going to negate the upturn elsewhere in the country, which will put the September quarterly result at virtually zero growth,' Dr Rynne said.

Mr Andrews' road map predicts Victorian businesses will not begin to reopen until at least October, which the research said could see a further $6billion to 8billion wiped off the economy.

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Professor of Epidemiology at the University of NSW Professor Mary-Louise McLaws on Tuesday shared how 14-day case totals in New South Wales are trending upwards over the past two weeks

Chair of Qantas, Woodside and the AFL Commission, Richard Goyder, is urging politicians to be forthcoming about the medical advice being used to justify the restrictions.

'It would be useful to understand the medical advice that governments are receiving and the context in which that advice has been asked for,' he said.

The lockdown's weekly cost to the national economy is now estimated to be $1billion per week, which means Victoria's total economic damage could spike to $20billion by the end of the year.

Earlier on Tuesday, Daniel Andrews hit back at Prime Minister Scott Morrison after he criticised the decision to keep Melbourne in Stage Four lockdown for another two weeks.

The Victorian premier has been slammed by the public, businesses and politicians over his refusal to reopen the collapsed economy.

'The plan that was outlined yesterday, I hope, is a worst-case scenario,' Mr Morrison said on Monday, a day after Mr Andrews released his highly-anticipated 'roadmap to recovery'.

'I see it as a starting point in terms of how this issue will be managed in the weeks and months ahead in Victoria.'

Mr Andrews fired back at Mr Morrison on Tuesday, saying 'there's just no place for politics' when tackling COVID-19.

'This virus will not be defeated by playing politics. I'd say to the Prime Minister the worst case scenario is being open for three or four weeks and then closed down again,' he said.

'That's the worst case scenario. Absolutely that's the worst case scenario and I'll continue to work closely with the Prime Minister and his team.

'There would be 15 minutes of happiness and then we'd be back in lockdown and arguably facing an even worse situation than we face now.

'If I can be so bold as to have a judgement on these things - I think I've got some insight into what's happening here in our state.'

On Monday morning, the premier said he is open to changing the plan.

'If we saw things change dramatically then we would obviously remodel the whole thing,' he told Melbourne radio station 3AW.

VICTORIAN CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER DEFENDS STATE'S CONTACT TRACING
Victoria is ramping up its much-maligned coronavirus contact tracing system amid more criticism from the federal government.

As Premier Daniel Andrews hit back at the prime minister, chief health officer Brett Sutton also defended the state's contact tracing following comments from federal Health Minister Greg Hunt.

Victoria had eight more deaths on Tuesday, but 55 new cases meant five-straight days under 100.

The premier said a team of officials would visit NSW later this week to look at that state's contact tracing system, which the prime minister has described as 'gold standard'.

Melbourne will also have five suburban response teams soon to help with contact tracing.

Asked if the NSW contact tracing system could have contained Victoria's hotel quarantine outbreak, Mr Hunt said: 'Yes, that's my belief.'

Professor Sutton told 3AW in response: 'I wish the system were as robust then as I know it is now.'

'But I can't say that it would have been stopped with a NSW system, by any means.'

'If the data was to fundamentally change then we would be standing up making different announcements.'

Mr Andrews also said he was not trying to eliminate the virus but suppress it enough that contact tracing teams can identify and isolate the contacts of every case.

He said after lockdown is lifted there will be cases but they would not necessarily mean a return to harsh restrictions, saying the state was not pursuing unrealistic eradication but controllable numbers.

'A strategy where you're trying to eradicate it would mean that if you had one case you would go back into lockdown. That's the difference,' he said.

'This thing, it moves so fast, so silently, that it can get away from you so fast.

'You've got to beat it first then you can find that new normal.'

On Monday Victoria announced nine more deaths from coronavirus, taking the state toll to 675 and the national figure to 762.

But there was some good news for the state, with new case numbers dropping significantly on Monday to 41.

Get tested immediately
Anyone who attended the venue at these times is considered close contacts and is directed to get tested and isolate for 14 days.

Plus Fitness, 47 Beecroft Rd Epping on September 5 between 9am - 10:15am

Source: NSW Health

It is Victoria's lowest daily case number since June 26.

Three of NSW's nine new infections reported on Tuesday were returned travellers in hotel quarantine, while five were linked to known outbreaks.

But NSW Health revealed the origin of one new infection from south eastern Sydney remains a mystery.

Three of the locally acquired cases have been traced back to Concord Hospital, including two healthcare workers, and a visitor.

State health authorities have now issued an alert for several venues across Sydney.

Meanwhile, another case at Kincoppal Rose Bay School of the Sacred Heart in Sydney's exclusive eastern suburbs has been linked to the CBD cluster which has now reached 66.

Two year seven students at the prestigious Catholic girl's high school also tested positive on Monday.

Today's patient was a boarding student living on the premises.

All boarding operations have now been suspended with students sent home and staff instructed to self-isolate.

The CBD cluster was also the source of a another case contracted through a household contact.

There's now growing concern in the state after clusters emerged at two Sydney hospitals in recent days

More than 100 health workers are now in isolation waiting on coronavirus tests.

Three healthcare workers at Sydney's Concord Repatriation General Hospital and Liverpool Hospital tested positive on Monday.

The health staff were diagnosed during investigations into an emergency department doctor, reported on Saturday, who worked at the two hospitals while potentially infectious.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


NSW Covid-19 hotspots: list of regional and Sydney outbreak locations
Here’s an overview of the state’s current hotspots and what to do if you’ve visited them. More detailed information is available at the NSW Health website.

List of outbreaks in NSW for 9 Sept.
If you were at the following venues on these dates you must get tested and self-isolate for 14 days, even if your test is negative.

Paperboy Cafe, Concord: 10am to 12pm on Sunday 6 September
Plus Fitness, Epping: 9am to 10.15am on Saturday 5 September
Oatlands Golf Glub, Oatlands: 6.30pm to 8.45pm Friday 4 September
Four in Hand Pub, Paddington: 6.30pm to 10pm on Wednesday 26 August, guests who attended downstairs at this time for more than two hours
It’s Time For Thai, Newtown: 5pm to 8pm on Friday 28 August
Kuleto’s Cocktail Bar, Newtown: 6.30pm to 9.30pm on Friday 28 August
City Tattersalls fitness centre, Sydney: 8am to 2pm on Wednesday 19 August, Friday 21 August, Sunday 23 August, Monday 24 August, Tuesday 25 August. Other members of City Tattersalls should get tested if they have even the mildest symptoms.
Hyde Park Medical Centre, Sydney: Monday 24 August to Saturday 5 September. Anyone who worked at Hyde Park Medical Centre (including physiotherapy, pathology, dermatology and dental practices and pharmacy on the ground floor of the building) should get tested immediately and self-isolate until a negative result is received.
Virgin Gym, Zetland: People who attended the active dance class at 7.40pm on Monday 24 August.
Fitness First, Randwick: Anyone who attended between Sunday 23 August and Tuesday 1 September should monitor for symptoms and if they develop, get tested right away and self-isolate.
Life in the Spirit Ministry, Prestons: Sunday 30 August, 12:30pm to 2:30pm
New Brighton Golf Club, Moorebank: 6:15pm on Friday 28 August to 12:30am on Saturday 29 August
With the growing number of cases in the area, NSW Health is asking all people who live in, or have visited, the following areas in the past two weeks to get tested if they have any symptoms of Covid-19 at all, even the mildest of symptoms such as a runny nose or scratchy throat.

Bankstown (suburb)
Cumberland local government area (LGA)
City of Sydney (East) LGA (includes central Sydney and the suburbs Surry Hills, Darlinghurst, Woolloomooloo, Potts Point, Rushcutters Bay, Elizabeth Bay, Centennial Park)
Fairfield LGA
Ku-ring-gai LGA
Liverpool LGA
Mt Druitt (suburb)
Parramatta LGA
Randwick LGA
Sutherland LGA
Waverley LGA
Willoughby LGA
Woollahra LGA
If you were at any of the following locations on these dates, monitor yourself for symptoms and self-isolate and get tested if symptoms occur.

Chemist Warehouse, Balmain: 2pm to 2.30pm on Friday 28 August
Woolworths, Balmain: 10am to 11am on Thursday 27 August
Balmain Community Pharmacy, Balmain: 11am to 11:20am on Monday 31 August
Platinum Fitness First, Bondi Junction: 7am to 5pm on Monday 31 August
Quality Suites (foyer), Camperdown: 3:15pm to 4:30pm on Saturday 29 August
Rydges Hotel, Camperdown: 2pm to 3.15pm on Saturday 29 August
University of Sydney Carslaw building toilets, Camperdown: 8pm to 8.20pm on Friday 28 August
Sushi Rio, Chatswood: 5.45pm to 7.30pm on Thursday 27 August
Westfield, Chatswood: 1pm to 1:50pm on Thursday 27 August
Gram Café and Pancakes, Chatswood: 11:10am to 12:15pm on Thursday 27 August
Clovelly Hotel, Clovelly: 12.45pm to 1.45pm on Saturday 5 September
Croydon Park Pharmacy, Croydon Park: 1pm to 2pm on Thursday 3 September
Metrol Fuel, Greystanes: 3.15pm to 3.35pm on Thursday 27 August
Leaf Café & Co, Lidcombe: Lidcombe Shopping Centre11:30am to 1:30pm on Monday 31 August
Randwick Golf Club, Malabar: 11.50am to 12.20pm on Tuesday 25 August
Fitness First, Maroubra: 8am to 12pm on Saturday 5 September
Big Bun, Merrylands: 3.30pm to 4pm on Thursday 27 August
Stockland, Merrylands: 9am to 11am on Saturday 29 August
Archie Bear cafe, Mosman Rowers: 11am to 12pm on Monday 24 August and 9am to 9.30am on Tuesday 25 August
Newtown Train Station, Newtown: 5.10pm to 5.20pm on Friday 28 August
BWS, Newtown: 5.15pm to 5.40pm on Friday 28 August
Off Ya Tree Clothing, Newtown: 7.15pm to 7.55pm on Friday 28 August
Aldi, North Strathfield: 10am to 10:30am on Tuesday 1 September
Bunnings Warehouse, Padstow: 12pm to 2pm on Thursday 27 August
God’s Power Ministries Heckenberg, Prestons: 2:50pm to 3:30pm on Sunday 30 August
Charles St Kitchen, Putney: 1.30pm to 1.40pm on Wednesday 26 August
Rosebery post shop, Rosebery: 1.30pm to 1.40pm on Wednesday 26 August
Rouse Hill Town Centre, Rouse Hill: 12.30pm to 1.30pm on Saturday 5 September
Stanhope Village Shopping Centre (including Kmart), Stanhope Gardens: 8.30am to 9.30am on Monday 7 September
St Ives shopping centre, St Ives: 2.30pm to 3.30pm on Monday 24 August and 5.30pm to 6pm on Wednesday 26 August
Coles St Ives Shopping Centre, St Ives: 1pm to 2pm on Friday 28 August
300 George Street, Sydney: Wednesday 19 August, Thursday 20 August, Friday 21 August, Monday 24 August
Virgin Active Mary Street, Sydney: 5.10pm to 6.40pm on Wednesday 26 August
Virgin Active Pitt Street, Sydney: 5pm to 6.30pm on Tuesday 25 August
Missing Spoon Cafe, Wahroonga: 4.45pm to 5.30pm on Saturday 5 September
Warriewood Shopping Centre, Warriewood: 12.30pm to 2.30pm on Saturday 29 August, including Kmart, Coles, Aldi and the food court
Magpies Waitara restaurant, Waitara: 24 August from 11.30am to 1.15pm
East Ryde Netball Association, West Ryde: 12.15pm to 1.30pm on Saturday 5 September
Mater Clinic, Wollstonecraft: 8.30am to 9am on Friday 28 August
If you travelled on any of the following public transport routes on these dates, monitor yourself for symptoms and self-isolate and get tested if symptoms occur.

Tuesday 25 August:

Central Coast train, at 6.49am from Woy Woy, arriving 7.36pm at Gordon, stopping at Woy Woy, Berowra, Hornsby, Gordon
Central Coast train, at 7.53am from Hornsby, arriving 8.28am at Woy Woy, arriving at 8.28am, direct
T4, Sydney eastern suburbs train, at 8.32am from Bondi Junction to Martin Place, arriving at 8.42am, stopping at Edgecliff, Kings Cross
T4, Sydney eastern suburbs train, at 5.51pm from Martin Place to Bondi Junction, arriving at 6.05pm stopping at Kings Cross, Edgecliff
T1 Blacktown to City train, at 6.58am from Blacktown to Central, arriving at 7.45am
T1 City to Blacktown train, at 6.25pm from Townhall to Blacktown arriving at 7.18pm
Wednesday 26 August:

T4, Sydney eastern suburbs train, at 7.56am from Bondi Junction to Martin Place, arriving at 8.07am, stopping at Edgecliff, Kings Cross
T1 Blacktown to City train, at 6.59am from Blacktown to Central, arriving at 7.41am
T1 City to Blacktown train, at 6.38pm from Townhall to Blacktown arriving at 7.35pm

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

SCHOOLS

Kincoppal cases continue
Around 100 students and 30 teaching staff from a Catholic girls' school in Sydney's east are in isolation, because they're close contacts of a boarding student who has COVID-19.

A third student from Kincoppal-Rose Bay tested positive for the virus on Sunday with all three cases linked to the City Tattersalls gym cluster that has now swelled to almost 70 cases.

The students and staff identified as close contacts will remain in home isolation for a fortnight.

Because of the reduced capacity to supervise students in the boarding facility, all boarders in years seven to 10 have been sent home.


NSW coronavirus restrictions on dancing could soon be about to change in time for year 12 formals
It's the antithesis of social distancing — but coronavirus restrictions on dancing and intermingling could soon be about to change.

Just over six weeks ago, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian insisted there would be "no singing, no mingling, no dancing" as .

Shortly after, NSW Police's Acting Commissioner Tony Cooke slammed a series of house parties in Bondi, in Sydney's east, as "***** behaviour".

But yesterday, NSW chief health officer Kerry Chant confirmed she was exploring "how we can conduct dancing safely, how we can encourage that intermingling" at school formals and graduation ceremonies.

This is what COVID-safe dance floors could look like.

What are the rules right now?
Since they reopened in May, dancing and mingling in bars, clubs and restaurants has been banned in NSW.

Weddings can go ahead in NSW with an attendee cap of 150, but only the happy couple are permitted on the dancefloor.

Despite NSW being hailed as Australia's "gold standard" for coronavirus suppression this week, the state has no timeframe for when dancing will be allowed.

In Melbourne, stage 4 restrictions mean weddings are banned unless an exemption is issued, which allows for a maximum of five people, and no mingling.

Some Victorians have taken to social media to get their dancing fix, with one doctor's important coronavirus message going viral.

In South Australia and Western Australia, nightclubs are back in the swing of things with dancefloors open for revellers — as long as a COVID safety plan is in place.

Is dancing and mingling an outbreak risk?
Epidemiologist Fiona Stanaway, from the University of Sydney, said the risks of dancing during a pandemic were twofold.

"Being in a closed indoor environment with other people is associated with increased transmission — and this risk increases with longer duration," Dr Stanaway said.

Additionally, dancing "increases the force of your respiration and results in greater respiratory droplet formation and increases the distance that they are likely to travel".

A spokesperson from NSW Health agreed, saying "high energy dance can spread COVID-19 if a participant is infected".

NSW has already seen coronavirus outbreaks from mingling and dancing — in March, 35 coronavirus cases sprung up after a wedding in Stanwell Tops, on the NSW South Coast.

But this week, Dr Chant said several factors meant school students were a lower risk of transmitting coronavirus while dancing.

She said year 12 students had already been in close proximity to each other throughout the school year.

"Just remember, a lot of these students have been sitting together in indoor environments sitting their exams," she said.

She also said an alcohol-free venue would make it easier to ensure COVID-compliance.

What would COVID-safe dancing look like?
A spokesperson from NSW Health said dancing at concerts would be required to adhere to the 4-square-metre rule as per a COVID-19 safety plan.

"This should address how the organisers will ensure that people comply with 1.5 metres physical distancing and minimise co-mingling of participants, including if/when they are dancing," the spokesperson said.

"Additional planning around these activities should be undertaken from a work health and safety perspective."

Dr Chant said that outdoor dancefloors reduced the risk of transmission of coronavirus, which is less likely to happen in open spaces.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian added that the one-off nature of school formals and graduation ceremonies meant they were easier to track-and-trace if there was a confirmed case.

Tasmanian health authorities have permitted dancing on school sites, citing the regular mixing of students and the straightforwardness of contact tracing in the controlled environment.

How is dancing and mingling done elsewhere?
The UK recently hosted its first socially-distanced festival, providing spaced areas for up to five people to dance, drink and sing.

Dr Jamie Ranse founded Griffith University's Mass Gathering Collaboration, a group who are working on festival health and safety during the pandemic.

He said the idea is to create "a pen-type of environment or a pig pen … where they can still enjoy the atmosphere of a music festival".

The new pop-up venue, dubbed the Unity Arena, welcomed 2,500 fans and the event was considered a health and safety success, though the financial viability of significantly lower-than-normal ticket sales was unclear.

As many as 200,000 tickets are typically sold for England's world-famous Glastonbury Festival, which was cancelled this year due to COVID-19.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/ns ... d=msedgdhp

What the HSC exams will look like during the pandemic
The NSW state government has announced its guidelines for the HSC exams at the end of the year.

Exam rooms will be cleaned and sanitised after each use and one person will collect papers at the end of each day.

NSW Education Minister Sarah Mitchell said masks will be optional during tests, just as they are in classrooms.

Temperature checks for students are "not necessary", NSW Health's Dr Jeremy McAnulty said, and will be up to the discretion of each school.

Marking will all be done online, presenting a "huge logistical challenge" for teachers.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

HOSPITAL CLUSTERS

Healthcare workers most infected with COVID-19 revealed
More than 3000 healthcare and aged care workers have contracted coronavirus in Victoria, with Australia's Deputy Chief Medical Officer describing the alarming number as "unacceptable".

Department of Health and Human Services figures show a total of 3286 healthcare workers have been diagnosed with COVID-19, with 2281 of those being acquired in the workplace.
here are still 252 active cases among healthcare workers in Victoria. The state recorded 76 new cases today.

"We've seen a large number of healthcare and residential aged care workers diagnosed with COVID-19," Dr Nick Coatsworth said.

"This is not an acceptable figure for any government – be it the Victorian Government or the Commonwealth Government.

"It is incumbent on all of us to do what we can to protect healthcare workers."
According to new data, aged care or disability workers had the greatest number of COVID-19 cases with 1398 infections, followed by nurses at 1256 and medical practitioners at 199.

Majority of infections - 2281 in total – were contracted in healthcare settings, with more than half (1407) acquired in aged care facilities.

Premier Daniel Andrews said the number of virus cases among healthcare workers continued to fall, while thanking those working on the frontline during the pandemic.

"A special mention and thank you to all the healthcare workers for the amazing job they are doing in difficult circumstances," he said today.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Sydney hospital bans ALL visitors and goes into lockdown
Concord Hospital in western Sydney has gone into lockdown, closing its doors to all visitors until at least Friday.

The drastic move comes after several healthcare workers at the hospital tested positive to coronavirus, sparking fears that vulnerable patients could become infected.

There are five cases linked to Concord Hospital, including the initial emergency ward worker who worked a shift while infectious on September 1.

The hospital will be closed to visitors from 8am on Wednesday to 10am on Friday for deep cleaning of all wards, but people needing medical care can still attend.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said it was 'concerning' that a person likely became infected after touching a surface in the hospital, as they were wearing full PPE.

'I am always concerned about those cases, because every case can blow out if you don't contact trace and isolate,' she told Sunrise.

'But what is concerning about the Concord Hospital example is that health are still doing discussions but they suspect that this is a case where someone has picked it up from a surface, because everybody who got it was wearing a mask and full PPE.

'This is really contagious ... whilst the pandemic is around and until we have a vaccine, all of us have to be cautious and assume we have got it or that people we are interacting with have it as well.'

NSW Health assured families and friends that arrangements will be made for them to be able to contact patients by phone or video calls.

'There is no evidence that there is ongoing risk in the hospital and patients should continue to visit to receive the medical care they need,' NSW Health said in a statement .Meanwhile, Sydney Local Health District (SLHD) said those identified as contacts are being tested, and are isolating at home for 14 days.
'As an additional precaution, all staff on the aged care wards are wearing full personal protective equipment (gowns, gloves, masks and goggles) to minimise risks to patients,' SLHD said in a statement.

'We know this is a worrying time, but we would like to thank you all for your patience and understanding.'

The hospital's closure to visitors comes after more than 100 health workers were forced into isolation waiting on coronavirus tests.

There were four new COVID-19 cases in NSW on Monday - a returned overseas traveller and three healthcare workers at Sydney's Concord Repatriation General Hospital and Liverpool Hospital.

The three healthcare workers were diagnosed during investigations into an emergency department doctor, reported on Saturday, who worked at the two hospitals while potentially infectious.

Another case, a visitor to a hospital emergency department where the doctor worked or sought treatment, was included in Tuesday's numbers, taking the cluster to five.

Patients considered close contacts of the infected, and all staff at Concord and Liverpool emergency departments who shared shifts with them are being isolated and tested.

The three newly reported health workers say they had no symptoms while at work, and also wore personal protective equipment while caring for patients.

Chief Health Officer Kerry Chant said there was no evidence to suggest NSW hospitals weren't operating safely and effectively, and urged people not to delay urgent care.

Authorities suspect at least one of the new cases caught the virus while both parties were wearing masks.

'For some of the cases there isn't that clear-cut direct contact without a surgical mask,' Dr Chant told reporters on Monday.

'We are exploring avenues of whether there could be transmission.

'If your hands are contaminated, and then you're touching computer screens or touching pens and pencils pieces of paper, can you actually transmit the virus?

Saturday's reported case worked at Liverpool Hospital's emergency department while potentially infections on September 3 between 8am and 6pm.

The healthcare worker also worked at Concord Repatriation General Hospital between 2pm and midnight on September 1.

Two of the new cases reported on Monday worked at Liverpool Hospital between September 2 and September 4

The third case worked at Concord's emergency department between 7pm on September 1 until 7am the next day.

Meanwhile, Premier Gladys Berejiklian on Monday confirmed school formals and graduations would be allowed to go ahead in term 4, despite a number of outbreaks in schools in recent months.

WHEN WERE THE HEALTHCARE WORKERS ON DUTY WHILE POTENTIALLY INFECTIOUS?
Liverpool Hospital
Concord Repatriation General Hospital'


Last night councillors unanimously voted not to proceed with next year's event, saying the risk of bringing COVID-19 to the region outweighed any economic concerns.

Mayor Col Murray said it was a tough decision to make.

"There's really no opportunity within current or predicted health regulations to do anything else," he said.

"Some people will argue that it's too far out to be making this call, but the reality is we have to engage in contracts.

"We've lost the support of our major sponsors, which is not unexpected."

Economic blow will be felt
The economic impact on the town is expected to be significant.

Usually the festival brings an about $50 million into the town each January.

Cr Murray said he empathised with the small businesses that would lose income as a result of the decision.

"The reality is the guidance we've had from government, from Destination NSW, from professional organisations like the Pub Group, Wests Entertainment Group, Servies Club, South Tamworth Bowlo, NSW Health — it's all the same," he said.

"It's just not a proposition at this stage."

Awards will go on, despite 'crazy times'
The Golden Guitar Awards will still go ahead, in a virtual format.

Festival manager Barry Harley says performers are backing the decision to cancel the festival.

"Their endorsement of the decision has been overwhelming," he said.

"Yes, they're sad it's not on, but very supportive of the logical conclusion that the festival could not go on in its current form."

It is the first time in its almost 50 year history that the festival has been called off.

Troy Cassar-Daley, a 33-time Golden Guitar Award winner, took to Facebook to express his sadness at the decision.

"The effect this has on Tamworth will be monumental, both financially and emotionally, so I'm thinking of all my friends and family down there," he said.

"The residents in that beautiful town have to be kept safe from COVID-19 and gatherings of this amount of people simply can't happen in these crazy times.

"As you all know this will affect a lot of musicians and artists who support their families with music please keep them in your thoughts today as we work through what has been one of the hardest years we've all experienced in our industry.

"I have huge history with this town and Tamworth has given me so much.

"We have word that the Golden guitar awards will go ahead as scheduled, but will be an online event.

"So at least that part of our tradition will not be lost this year."[/quote]
https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Western Sydney hospital cluster forces 100 workers into isolation
ix health care workers have now been linked to the latest outbreak in Western Sydney as New South Wales health authorities work to uncover the source of infection.

The infected workers included one in the Concord Hospital Emergency Department and two others who worked in the Liverpool Hospital Emergency Department, prompting 100 health care workers to enter isolation while awaiting test results.
A person who visited a patient at the Concord ED also returned a positive test.

NSW health authorities investigated fomite transmission as one possible theory for the spread, which was where the virus spread through contaminated surfaces.

All non-urgent surgeries were suspended until Friday, while doctors and nurses from other hospitals faced being re-deployed to cover the shortfall.

NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard said it was not unexpected a small number of health workers became infected in the fight against the virus.

The state recorded nine new cases in the past 24 hour period.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

New South Wales to manufacture ventilators
Premier Gladys Berejiklian says New South Wales will manufacture ventilators, which can be distributed domestically and overseas.

"Can I say how incredibly proud I am that after March, when Minister Ayres and myself, issued a call to arms to NSW businesses to support us during the pandemic we've had two different groups of smart people, one university-based in Sydney another company based in Hunter work together to provide the prototypes of these two great ventilators," Ms Berejiklian said.
The ventilators will be produced in a few months and should have regulatory approval shortly according to Ms Berejiklian.

"They are going through the approval process and are nearly there for manufacturing. It is a really exciting time in NSW."

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said the crucial instruments can be the difference between life and death.

“In some of the worst-hit nations, health staff was forced to choose who got access to a ventilator, so we need a reliable local supply chain to safeguard NSW patients,” Mr Hazzard said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

QLD--NSW BORDER
F.I.F.O wife slams Annastacia Palaszczuk over senseless border closures
A young mother with a newborn baby has been left in limbo over when she will next be reunited with her mine worker husband due to Queensland's strict border restrictions.

Laura Goff, 29, and Chris Bennett, 27, welcomed their daughter Adalyn at the end of July in Wangi Wangi, Lake Macquarie, New South Wales.

But six weeks later, Mr Bennett, a fitter in mines at Moranbah in North Queensland, was forced to leave his loved ones behind to return to his week-on-week-off work schedule in North Queensland.

Queensland's mandatory $2,800 two-week hotel quarantine for anyone entering the state from NSW will make it impossible for the young father to return to see his family during his days off.
<< her husband is a mine fitter in QLD . He'll earn $3000 in a 2 or 3 days EASILY , if he's an engineer or professional ( lab or management ) , he'll make this in a day or 2 , so money is not the issue here . perhaps she should move permanently to QLD ,even if he remains on a F.I.F.O roster , this might be happening soon for her anyway as Rio Tinto , Hamersley, BHP and other big miners are moving their F.I.F.O workers' families interstate and paying all costs for them to sweeten the move >>
Ms Goff doesn't even know when she will see her husband again, and is grappling with raising and watching seven-week-old daughter Adalyn meet milestones on her own.

'I try not to get too caught up in the fact that he works away because that's entirely our choice, but it is hard knowing that I don't know when he is going to come back,' she told the Newcastle Herald.

'He usually comes back and we get a full week of family stuff, but we just don't get that at the moment.'

Mr Bennett is currently in hotel quarantine in Brisbane, where he spent his first Father's Day alone.

The young father said it was hard leaving his newborn family last month not knowing when he would see them again.

Annastacia Palaszczuk has faced growing criticism of her tough border restrictions, including from national politicians who argue it is drastically impacting the Australian economy.

The premier's policy has also been slammed for double standards, after a pregnant NSW woman lost one of her unborn twins after being denied entry to a nearby QLD hospital, while 400 AFL employees and their families were openly welcomed into the state.

Ms Goff said it was frustrating watching the league families get special treatment and enjoy quarantine in a lavish private resort while others are forced to pay.

'They've just let a whole football code go over the border and stay in a hotel, with their wives having cocktails with each other not social distancing at the swim-up bar, and Chris is in quarantine and I'm trying to take photos and videos of our baby smiling for the first time so he is not missing out,' she said.

The couple, who have been together three years, had lived in Airlie Beach but relocated to NSW in January to be closer to family ahead of their daughter's birth.

They are now considering the possibility of moving back north if the border remains shut long-term.

Mr Bennett has been a FIFO ( BHP JV ) Coal Miner for six years, an irregular lifestyle the couple have acclimatised to in return for the financial benefits.
<< lot of people I know who work at the same group of mines and washeries , live on the coast and do DIDO rosters ( weekly ).>>

While they have accepted the harsh work schedule, they are disheartened by the inflexibility of Queensland's border policy which is preventing the young family from spending time together.

Image
Mr Bennett said the young family are now considering moving to Queensland if the strict border restrictions remain in place long-term. Pictured: Mr Bennett's FIFO route between home in NSW and work in Queensland.

He'll drive Wangi Wangi ( Western Lake Macquarie ) to Williamtown , Flies from Williamtown - Brisbane - Moranbah , 1 hr car + 4 hr air travel each way . << I'd done this several times as a consulting engineer >>

When states shut down borders as the coronavirus outbreak unfurled in March, Mr Bennett became stuck in QLD for three months while a pregnant Ms Goff was in NSW.

To their relief, the border's reopened in July as their due date loomed and Mr Bennett flew home.

During that time, Adalyn arrived early and the mine worker took six weeks off to spend with his girls.

Mr Bennett said the issue was not knowing when he would he would be home or being given any clear guidelines by the Queensland government.

Adding to their frustration, their are no active cases of COVID-19 in the hunter region where the young family are based.

Mr Bennett said about 20 of his colleagues from NSW or Victoria are also unable to see their families due to the strict measures.

The Queensland government considers all of NSW, VIC and ACT, COVID-19 hotspots, with Ms Palasczuk banning residents from freely entering the state until NSW enjoys 28 days without community transmission.

Her strict requirements have come under fire from fellow politicians, including Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian.

Mr Morrison has urged the QLD Premier to reopen, arguing movement between states is essential to saving the nation's tourism industry.

The pandemic-induced lockdowns and border restrictions has jeopardised one million tourism jobs, and is set to cost the country a whopping $54.6billion this year.

WHAT ARE QUEENSLAND'S BORDER RULES?
You will have to quarantine if you:

- Have been overseas in the last 14 days

-Have been in contact with someone who has COVID-19 in the last 14 days

-Have been in a COVID-19 hotspot in the last 14 days (and you are allowed to enter)

-Have COVID-19 or have had COVID-19 in the last 14 days

-Have had COVID-19 symptoms in the last 14 days

-Are a Queensland border zone resident who travelled outside the border zone in New South Wales

-Are a New South Wales border zone resident who travelled outside the border zone in New South Wales

You may not have to quarantine if you have been in a COVID-19 hotspot in the last 14 days if you:

- Need to come to Queensland to complete an essential activity

-Arrive into Queensland by air and you transfer directly to another flight to leave Queensland or quarantine until your flight out of Queensland

-Were in a COVID-19 hotspot for the sole purpose of transiting through an airport, excluding Melbourne Tullamarine airport

-Can provide evidence that you completed mandatory hotel quarantine in a COVID-19 hotspot and immediately transited to Queensland, unless you flew out of Melbourne Tullamarine airport

-Are a border zone resident and have not been in a hotspot in the last 14 days

Those crossing Queensland borders, will be screened and need to provide Queensland Border Declaration Passes and identification

Providing false, misleading or incorrect information on a Border Declaration is an offence punishable by a fine of $4,003, a court-imposed penalty of up to $13,345 or 6 months

<< a mine maintenance fitter , he'll easily qualify as an essential worker.
As a FIFO worker living in a FIFO "camp" or motel room , he can be regarded as being isolated when at site ( provided he stays out of town and away from the shops and the local pub ) .>>
https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


'I do begrudge her': NSW Premier on Queensland's border stance
The tension between the New South Wales and Queensland premiers doesn't appear to be easing anytime soon, with Gladys Berejiklian insisting there is no health basis to close the southern border.

"I do begrudge her because situation has got very low community transmission," Ms Berejikilian told Today.

"And NSW has shown that you can have open borders."

A number of Queenslanders were in NSW hotels, quarantined with COVID-19, Ms Berejiklian said.

"If you are confident in your health system, if you are confident that you can do things, if we had high case numbers like Victoria, of course I would support them closing the borders.

"But when the case numbers are so low at this stage and yes, it's a daily battle, why would you close your borders?

"Why would you hurt your businesses and jobs in your own state?

"And for NSW, I know how frustrating it is for all of our citizens who have relatives, or friends in other parts of Australia and not just on a human level but also economically."

The two leaders have recently spoken about the issue after a long stand-off, with Ms Berejiklian previously suggesting Annastacia Palaszczuk was not returning her calls.

"I have had conversations with her," Ms Berejiklian said this morning.

"Yes, I have spoken to her but we also have these conversations at length at National Cabinet.

"I don't know (if) it's because we are NSW and maybe we have a different world view of our nation, but you know, with Victoria out of action you have to think about what is going to power our economy forward.

"Normally NSW and Victoria subsidises the smaller states with GST and other things, so what is going to happen in six months or a year if our economies aren't able to function in a reasonable rate?

"That does worry me because I worry about jobs and job security."

Ms Berejiklian also condemned a Sydney pub caught repeatedly breaching COVID-Safe rules. It will now be closed for a week and has copped a $10,000 fine.

"I really am frustrated because the vast majority are doing the right thing," Ms Berejiklian said.

"But you have to have three strikes before we shut you down. So that's really disappointing.

"If you have had a fine you have been shut down for a few days, and then you do it again and ignore t that is how the disease spreads."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Berejiklian opens up on border battle
New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian has opened up to Sky News about the ongoing border battle at National Cabinet.

In an exclusive interview with Political Editor Andrew Clennell, Ms Berejiklian has implored other state leaders to think of the economic consequences if states like Western Australia and Queensland don’t reopen.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp


REGIONAL

2021 Tamworth Country Music Festival cancelled due to COVID-19 risk
Image
The Tamworth Regional Council has officially decided the 2021 Country Music Festival will not go ahead.

Last night councillors unanimously voted not to proceed with next year's event, saying the risk of bringing COVID-19 to the region outweighed any economic concerns.

Mayor Col Murray said it was a tough decision to make.

"There's really no opportunity within current or predicted health regulations to do anything else," he said.

"Some people will argue that it's too far out to be making this call, but the reality is we have to engage in contracts.

"We've lost the support of our major sponsors, which is not unexpected."

Economic blow will be felt
The economic impact on the town is expected to be significant.

Usually the festival brings an about $50 million into the town each January.

Cr Murray said he empathised with the small businesses that would lose income as a result of the decision.

"The reality is the guidance we've had from government, from Destination NSW, from professional organisations like the Pub Group, Wests Entertainment Group, Servies Club, South Tamworth Bowlo, NSW Health — it's all the same," he said.

"It's just not a proposition at this stage."

Awards will go on, despite 'crazy times'
The Golden Guitar Awards will still go ahead, in a virtual format.

Festival manager Barry Harley says performers are backing the decision to cancel the festival.

"Their endorsement of the decision has been overwhelming," he said.

"Yes, they're sad it's not on, but very supportive of the logical conclusion that the festival could not go on in its current form."

It is the first time in its almost 50 year history that the festival has been called off.

Troy Cassar-Daley, a 33-time Golden Guitar Award winner, took to Facebook to express his sadness at the decision.

"The effect this has on Tamworth will be monumental, both financially and emotionally, so I'm thinking of all my friends and family down there," he said.

"The residents in that beautiful town have to be kept safe from COVID-19 and gatherings of this amount of people simply can't happen in these crazy times.

"As you all know this will affect a lot of musicians and artists who support their families with music please keep them in your thoughts today as we work through what has been one of the hardest years we've all experienced in our industry.

"I have huge history with this town and Tamworth has given me so much.

"We have word that the Golden guitar awards will go ahead as scheduled, but will be an online event.

"So at least that part of our tradition will not be lost this year."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

BREACHES
Multiple COVID-breaches closes hotel = Sydney pub ordered to close for a week after breaking coronavirus rules
Image
The Unity Hall Hotel in Balmain is the first NSW venue to be closed down for COVID-19 safety breaches.
An inner-city Sydney pub has been forced to close its doors after management admitted it did not understand coronavirus regulations.

Unity Hall Hotel in Balmain received the closure notice from NSW Liquor and Gaming for disobeying regulations on two separate occasions.
A day after it was hit with a penalty notice for COVID-19 health breaches, the Unity Hall Hotel in Balmain was caught hosting two birthday parties and also failed to follow its coronavirus safety plan, NSW Department of Customer Service said last night.

The pub has been forced to close for a week from 5am today and has been fined a total of $10,000 by NSW Police and Liquor and Gaming authorities.
"I don't enjoy seeing businesses shut, but if they are putting everybody else at risk I have no hesitation," NSW Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello said.

"We don't have a vaccine yet, we are still living in pandemic conditions and if people have any doubt about the severity of it, look at Victoria."

The pub had initially been fined $5000 after an inspection on August 5 revealed chairs and tables not appropriately distanced, inadequate sign-in processes and incomplete digitised records. Authorities said the penalty notice was handed out on August 7.

Police turned up the next day, August 8, responding to a public complaint. They found 32 guests drinking while standing, dancing and mingling at what seemed to be a private function, and fined the Unity Hall Hotel another $5000.
When Liquor and Gaming authorities reviewed CCTV from the venue, they confirmed it had breached rules for a 10-person limit on bookings, dancing, and only permitting drinking when seated.

The pub last night apologised "unreservedly" in a post on Facebook and promised new procedures were in place.

"We acknowledge that we did not fully understand every aspect of the changing regulations and we should have.

"The standards required of the hotel by the health authorities are very high, but we recognise that the consequences of this virus are severe and are not to be taken lightly."

https://www.facebook.com/UnityHallHotel ... 3459910457

Director of Compliance Dimitri Argeres said inspectors could close venues after a second offence.

"People in large groups who are known to each other are far more likely to mingle – including by dancing – and this increases the risk of transmission," he said.
"Each person brings with them a history of interaction with others in the community which means the more people in a group, the more close contacts they are sharing across that group.

"To repeatedly not comply with the Public Health Orders poses a clear and significant risk to public health."

So far, 108 fines totalling $480,000 have been handed out to hospitality businesses in NSW.


The hotel will be closed for seven days and management has promised updates to the health and safety plan.

"The standards required of the hotel by health authorities are very high, but we recognise that the consequences of this virus are severe and not to be taken lightly," a statement read.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/s ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Sep 09, 2020 9:33 am

9 SEPT QLD

Queensland Covid-19 hotspots: list of Brisbane and south-east Qld outbreak locations
Queensland authorities are fighting to contain a Covid-19 outbreak in the south-east of the state stemming from the Brisbane youth detention centre at Wacol. While no children detained at the centre have yet contracted the virus, workers and their families have created a small community cluster.
To contain the outbreak, Queensland authorities have released a list of hotspots where Covid-positive people visited while infectious.

Those who attended some locations must isolate immediately for 14 days. Others will be contacted by members of the public health team to discuss next steps.

Related: NSW Covid-19 hotspots: list of regional and Sydney outbreak locations

More detailed information is available on the Queensland government website. This list will be updated as more locations are added or removed.

Hotspot locations
All passengers sitting in rows 25 to 29 on flight VA962 from Brisbane to Sydney on 17 August must isolate immediately for 14 days. If they develop symptoms they must get tested.

All other passengers on board the flight should monitor for symptoms.

Public health officials will be also contacting all those who dined at the Jam Pantry cafe in Greenslopes on 16 August between 9.45am and 11am.

Those who attended the cafe outside those hours should monitor for symptoms.

Potential hotspot locations
According to the Queensland government, everyone who attended these locations during the listed time should monitor for Covid symptoms and immediately get tested if they develop.

4 September

Super IGA Supermarket, Russell Island: 8.00am-8.30am
Coles, Karalee: 9.30am-10.15am
Ipswich Garden Centre, Raceview: 12.30pm-1.30pm
3 September

Super IGA Supermarket, Russell Island: 12.00pm-2.00pm
2 September

Russell Island Pharmacy, Russell Island: morning
1 September

Canaipa Nursery & Tea Centre, Russell Island: 12.00pm-12.30pm
Super IGA Supermarket, Russell Island: 12.40pm-12.50pm
Passenger Ferry: Russell Island to Redland Bay: 1.30pm-2.10pm
Passenger Ferry: Redland Bay to Russell Island: 4.00pm-4.30pm
31 August

Woolworths, Yamanto: 11am to 11.15am
Country Market, Yamanto: 11.20am to 11.40am
Priceline, Yamanto: 11.40am to 11.45am
30 August

Woolworths, Yamanto: 12pm to 12.20pm
Dominos, Yamanto: 11.45am to 12.30pm
29 August

Spa Choice, Springwood: 10.30am to 11am
Spa World, Underwood: 11am to 11.30am
Dosa Hut, Springfield: 11.55am to 12pm
Indian Spice Shop, Springfield: 12pm to 12.05pm
27 August

Princess Alexandra hospital fever clinic, Woolloongabba: 12.40pm to 12.55pm
Priceline Pharmacy, Forest Lake: 9am to 9.10am
Coles Forest Lake shopping centre, Forest Lake: 9.15am to 9.30am
Pizza Hut, Beenleigh:
TSG Tobacconist, Eagleby: 4.50pm to 5pm
26 August

Coomera Westfield, Coomera: 9.30am to 10.25am
Woolworths Pimpama Junction, Pimpama: 10.40am to 10.50am
Kmart Oxenford, Oxenford: 11am to 11.10am
Bunnings Oxenford, Oxenford: 11.20am to 11.50am
Woolworths Pimpama Junction, Pimpama: 12.00pm to 12.15pm
Zazar’s Kebabs Pimpama, Pimpama: 12.15pm to 12.25pm
Logan Motorway BP service centre and McDonald’s, Larapinta: 5.45pm to 5.50pm
Gold Coast University hospital fever clinic, Southport: 7pm to 7.20pm
Pub Lane Tavern, Greenbank shopping centre, Greenbank: 7.30pm to 9.30pm
Platypus Shoes, Hyperdome Shopping Centre, Loganholme: 5pm to 5.30pm
Footlocker, Hyperdome Shoping Centre, Loganholme: 5pm to 5.30pm
The Reject Shop, Hyperdome Shoping Centre, Loganholme: 4.35pm to 4.55pm
Kmart, Hyperdome Shoping Centre, Loganholme: 4.05pm to 4.30pm
Best & Less, Hyperdome Shopping Centre, Loganholme: 3.15pm to 5.45pm
Madhouse Discount Variety, Waterford Plaza, Waterford West: 1.50pm to 2.15pm
25 August

Logan Motorway BP service centre and McDonald’s, Larapinta: 6.40am to 6.45am
Logan Motorway BP service centre and McDonald’s, Larapinta 4.20pm to 4.30pm
24 August

The Good Guys, Oxley: 9am to 9.45am
Woolworths, the Station Oxley, Oxley: 10am to 10.30am
Perks Cafe, Jimboomba Central shopping centre, Jimboomba: 10am to 10.45am
Woolworths, Jimboomba Central shopping centre, Jimboomba: 11am to 11.15am
Logan Motorway BP service centre and McDonald’s, Larapinta: 4.20pm to 4.30pm
Coomera Westfield, Coomera: 5.30pm to 6pm

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Queensland records 8 new coronavirus cases as border tensions rise
Queensland has recorded eight new coronavirus cases overnight, the state's biggest daily rise in nearly five months, including three more workers from Ipswich Hospital.

The other five cases were members of the same family who were under quarantine in a household when they were diagnosed. These cases are linked to the cluster at the Queensland Correctional Services Academy.

The spike in cases follows New South Wales premier Gladys Berejiklian admitting she 'does begrudge' the Queensland premier of her decision to keep the southern border shut.

Speaking on Today on Wednesday, Ms Berejiklian said there was no health basis to keeping the border shut.

'I do begrudge her because the situation has got very low community transmission,' Ms Berejikilian said.

'And NSW has shown that you can have open borders.'

Tensions between the two leaders have been simmering for months over Queensland's decision to keep the southern border shut.

Ms Berejiklian said a number of Queensland residents were in New South Wales hotels under quarantine with COVID-19.

She said if NSW had high numbers like Victoria then closing the border was a sensible measure, however, state's with a confident health system and low numbers should not be isolated.

'When the case numbers are so low at this stage and yes, it's a daily battle, why would you close your borders? Why would you hurt your businesses and jobs in your own state?'

The eight new cases in Queensland brings the number of active cases in the state to 29. Since the pandemic began there have been 1143 confirmed cases in the state, six of theMs Palaszczuk told parliament on Wednesday morning that despite the jump in cases there was no need to be alarmed and credited the state's 'professional testing system' and 'vigilant' residents.

'We have had remarkable success in containing the virus.' she said.

Ms Berejiklian has previously hinted that Ms Palaszczuk was not returning her calls over the border issue but backtracked on Wednesday morning.

'I have had conversations with her. Yes, I have spoken to her but we also have these conversations at length at National Cabinet,' Ms Berejiklian said.

The NSW Premier said one of her concerns was the Australian economy as a whole and 'with Victoria out of action' other states need to step up.

'Normally NSW and Victoria subsidises the smaller states with GST and other things, so what is going to happen in six months or a year if our economies aren't able to function in a reasonable rate?'

Queensland briefly reopened the state's southern border in July before shutting again amid a spike in cases in New South Wales.

The Queensland treasurer in September revealed that the state's economic forecasts were being based on the assumption that Queensland border would not reopen until early 2021.

.Meanwhile, the AFL has been rocked by reports its controversial quarantine hub in Queensland has turned into an 'out of control' party.

About 400 AFL players and officials flew to Queensland from coronavirus-riddled Victoria a week ago after being given approval to dodge the state's lockdown.

The move infuriated those who unsuccessfully applied for a medical exemption to skip premier Annastacia Palaszczuk's mandatory hotel quarantine.

AFL boss Gill McLachlan is angered by the behaviour in the hub at the Mecure Resort, after scrutiny across Australia, with many angry the game's elite are being treated specially.

Furious Channel Nine reporter Tony Jones described the quarantine hub as 'out of control' and questioned some of those who have been allowed into the hub.

'I don't agree with some of the people that have gone up there. You're talking about grandparents, babysitters, the girlfriend of a reporter, there's even suggestions a swimming coach has gone up there for the kids — this is out of control,' Jones told Footy Classified on Monday night.

Fremantle Dockers stars were revealed to be living it up in the Queensland AFL hub, with several players sharing pictures from an incredible waterfall adventure on Tuesday.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

BORDER ISSUES
Queensland government withholding 'clarification' on student border exemptions
Regional Education Minister Andrew Gee is calling on the Queensland government to provide clarity and a formal declaration on the border exemptions for boarding school students from New South Wales and the ACT.

Queensland’s Chief Health Officer Jeanette Young granted travel exemptions to those students from NSW and ACT who had been separated from their families for many months due to the state’s strict border restrictions.The ruling applied to boarding students from areas with no coronavirus cases and will allow them to return home without having to go into mandatory hotel quarantine.

Mr Gee told Sky News it was a “positive sign” but the Queensland government was yet to provide official confirmation of the changes.

“So the parents and the kids up there are going, ‘well on the face of it, its great news’,” he said.

“But how come the Queensland government hasn’t come out and clarified exactly what the position is and actually made a statement on it?

“My concern is that it’s the new politics of COVID border closures in that these children and their families are just pawns in a wider political game and for the purpose of trying to save the skins of certain state governments.

“I think we just have to have a common sense, caring and practical approach on this, but it needs to be a unified approach.

“At the moment we’ve got a mish-mash of regulations, no one’s really sure what’s going and we just need some certainty and uniformity so the anguish of these students and parents can actually end.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Tom Hanks' special treatment sparks row between Annastacia Palaszcuzuk and Queensland MP
Tom Hanks doesn't have to undergo hotel quarantine after flying into Queensland from the US, despite Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk's 'double-standard' border closures tearing families apart and leaving small towns without supplies.
Ms Palaszczuk copped fierce criticism for letting 400 AFL officials descend on the state ahead of the Grand Final, while repeatedly knocking back everyday Australians with health or family reasons.

The embattled premier took on a line-up of opposition MPs who grilled her in parliament on Wednesday about the consistency of her border rules designed to contain COVID-19 in southern states.

Liberal National Party MP Laura Gerber on Wednesday asked if the American movie star was in mandatory quarantine after flying into Gold Coast on Tuesday night.

Hanks and his wife Rita Wilson tested positive for COVID-19 and underwent 14 days of self-isolation on the Gold Coast in March, during the filming of Baz Luhrmann's Elvis Presley biopic.

The Hollywood couple's diagnosis came after the couple met with several celebrities on the east coast, before Richard Wilkins also tested positive.

Rather than spending two weeks in a small room at one of the hotels participating in the quarantine scheme, Hanks and the film crew are allowed to isolate in a luxury resort at Broadbeach, 7News reports.

The production company has rented out several floors of the resort to operate its own quarantine operations, meaning Hanks is free to roam throughout the designated areas.

Hotels that regular Australians and returned travellers have been forced to isolate in have come under fire for poor quality food, small rooms and a lack of fresh air.

Ms Palaszczuk confirmed Hanks was exempt from quarantine under the film industry's COVID-safe plan.

'Under that plan they have to stay in the place for two weeks just like everybody else and they will have random checks, as my understanding, by the police,' she told parliament.

'I've had discussion with Mayor Tom Tate to find out how we can have more production on the Gold Coast because other countries are shut down because of COVID.'

Currumbin LNP MP Laura Gerber, who was one of the MPs questioning the premier over her border closures, was ordered to leave the floor for an hour after several interjections.

Ms Palaszczuk says the film will bring more than $100million and 900 jobs into the Gold Coast economy.

She defended the border policy as recommended by Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young, saying if it wasn't in place Queensland could be in a situation like Victoria.

'I don't know what the future holds, I don't know if all this could be at risk if at the end of October, if the LNP is in office and the borders are open,' she said.

The premier's special treatment of Hanks is likely to stir up even more criticism, after a Queensland grandmother was forced to recover from brain surgery in a quarantine hotel.

Jayne Brown, 60, spent two weeks confined to a tiny hotel room in Brisbane following her recent return from Sydney, where renowned neurosurgeon Dr Charlie Teo removed two large tumours on her brain.

The grandmother-of-seven requested an exemption from hotel quarantine to self-isolate at home on the Sunshine Coast, but was rejected twice.

She blasted the Queensland premier, who allowed 400 AFL players and officials from coronavirus-riddled Victoria to enter the state last Tuesday night.

'I don't understand it, mind-blowing,' Ms Brown told Nine News last week.

Not even a letter from Dr Teo himself could convince Queensland officials to change their mind and allow Ms Brown and her husband to isolate at their home.

Instead, she struggled through hotel confinement in agony unable to walk and limited access to pain relief.

Meanwhile, a young mother with a newborn baby has been left in limbo over when she will next be reunited with her mine worker husband due to Queensland's strict border restrictions.

Laura Goff, 29, and Chris Bennett, 27, welcomed their daughter Adalyn at the end of July in Wangi Wangi, Lake Macquarie, NSW.

But six weeks later, Mr Bennett, a fitter in mines at Moranbah in North Queensland, was forced to leave his loved ones behind to return to his week-on-week-off work schedule in North Queensland.
Queensland's mandatory $2,800 two-week hotel quarantine for anyone entering the state from NSW will make it impossible for the young father to return to see his family during his days off.

Ms Goff doesn't even know when she will see her husband again, and is grappling with raising and watching seven-week-old daughter Adalyn meet milestones on her own.

'I try not to get too caught up in the fact that he works away because that's entirely our choice, but it is hard knowing that I don't know when he is going to come back,' she told the Newcastle Herald.

'He usually comes back and we get a full week of family stuff, but we just don't get that at the moment.'

Ms Palaszczuk was slammed last week for saying Queensland's hospitals were 'for our people only'.

A heavily pregnant mother was forced to wait 16 hours for emergency surgery in Sydney after being turned away at the Queensland border, before losing one of her unborn twin babies.

Ms Palaszczuk initially did not grant the seriously ill mum-to-be's exemption despite her needing emergency surgery for the unborn twins.

The mother, from Ballina in New South Wales which is 88km from the Queensland border, had twins who were just 24 weeks along and needed urgent care.

She wasn't initially granted an exemption to cross the border for surgery at the Gold Coast University Hospital 125km away and instead had to wait for 16 hours in Lismore for a flight to Sydney.

The woman's father Allan Watt says one of the twins became anaemic during surgery at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney.

Mr Watt said the family were very upset about his daughter being denied an exemption.

Queensland Chief Officer Dr Jeannette Young said the NSW woman's exemption had been approved as soon as her application had been made.

Ms Palaszczuk had said last week while she was not aware of the specifics of the case, the decision about who to let into Queensland would be made by health professionals, not politicians.

'People living in NSW have NSW hospitals. In Queensland, we have Queensland hospitals for our people,' she said.

The premier's no-nonsense stance on border closures have also left a small drought-stricken town without any supplies.

A fire tore through Mungindi, on both sides of the Queensland and New South Wales border, last week - wiping out its only supermarket and butcher.

But due to border closures, locals have been forced to leave their border bubble to get essentials, or travel 160km to the nearest supermarket.

Moree Plains Shire Mayor Katrina Humphries said Mungindi's 600 locals would be forced to leave their border bubble to travel to Mooree to buy supplies.

'Although we are in the shire we aren't all in the bubble, only selected postcodes have been included in it,' she told Daily Mail Australia.

'It's completely split our shire. I've spoken to elderly people who are so frightened that they can't get into Moree to go to the shops because then they'll break the travel bubble.'

New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian on Wednesday admitted she 'does begrudge' Ms Palaszczuk of her decision to keep the southern border shut.

Speaking on Today on Wednesday, Ms Berejiklian said there was no health basis to keeping the border restrictions.

'I do begrudge her because the situation has got very low community transmission,' Ms Berejikilian said.

'And NSW has shown that you can have open borders.'

Tensions between the two leaders have been simmering for months over Queensland's decision to keep the southern border closed.

Ms Berejiklian said a number of Queensland residents were in New South Wales hotels under quarantine with COVID-19.

She claimed if NSW had high numbers like Victoria then closing the border was a sensible measure, however, states with a confident health system and low numbers should not be isolated.

'When the case numbers are so low at this stage and yes, it's a daily battle, why would you close your borders? Why would you hurt your businesses and jobs in your own state?'

The eight new cases in Queensland brings the number of active cases in the state to 29. Since the pandemic began there have been 1143 confirmed cases in the state, six of therm deadly.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg also criticised Ms Palaszczuk's major coup in securing the AFL grand final, accusing her of favouring sporting stars over desperate families needing to cross the border for medical reasons.

The Queensland Premier proudly announced that she'd secured the landmark match on Tuesday alongside AFL CEO Gil McLachlan, who was granted an exemption to fly in to the Sunshine State for the announcement.

The Gabba in Brisbane was awarded AFL's showpiece event over Perth's Optus Stadium and the Adelaide Oval last week.

But Mr Frydenberg, along with hordes of others, have argued the celebrations were insensitive to families who had been barred from entering Queensland.

'I think the Queensland Premier has got some questions to answer here,' he told A Current Affair.

'How can it be okay for people to go up to prepare for a footy game, and its not okay to go to hospital for treatment?'

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
<< Hanks is hardly an ESSENTAL INTERNATIONAL WORKER , it's a very bad look , and he should have been told to quarantine as there are more than on genetic strain of covid19 at loss in the USA , and he could very earily be infected (again). >>

IPSWICH CLUSTER
Coronavirus case in Ipswich shuts St Edmund's College as eight new cases are recorded in Queensland
Queensland has recorded eight new cases of coronavirus suspected to be linked to existing clusters.

Five of the cases are from the same family, in the same household, and relate to the cluster at the Queensland Correctional Services training academy at Wacol in Brisbane's west.

A further three of those cases are linked to a cluster at the Ipswich Hospital, including two healthcare workers already in quarantine and one of their children.

The ABC understands the child is a year 11 student at St Edmund's College.

The Catholic boys' school in Ipswich has closed for cleaning and contact tracing, and all parents have been contacted.

The Principal of St Edmunds College in Ipswich, Ray Celegato, said the school was likely to be closed until next week.

"We were advised yesterday that he was positive and so Queensland Health then asked us to shut down for 48 hours," Mr Celegato said.

"One of the things that we have been certainly aware of is the need for deep cleaning, and so we will be likely to be closed until next week to ensure that the school is thoroughly deep cleaned."

He said the year 11 student had only been at the campus for exams.

"Those students who are likely to have been exposed will be contacted and be given the opportunity for testing." Mr Celegato said.

"[Queensland Health is] comfortable with the fact that the risk of exposure was low.

"We are concerned about our young man but we certainly know that he's being looked after and we wish him and his family all the best over the next few weeks."

He confirmed other schools in the area taught siblings of St Edmund's College students and they had been informed of the case.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the high number of cases was concerning, but urged Queenslanders not be alarmed.

"From the outset I want to assure Queenslanders that although that number is our highest daily tally for some time, each of those people diagnosed is related to existing cases," she said.

"This is not a time for alarm, this is a time for thanks that our testing system is so professional and Queenslanders are so vigilant, and that we've had remarkable success in containing this virus."

Health Minister Steven Miles said contact tracers had been working through the night to identify new locations where the positive infections had visited.

Mr Miles said Queensland Health was expected to provide updates throughout the day.

The state now has 29 active COVID-19 cases.

More than 12,000 tests were performed in the past 24 hours.

Ms Palaszczuk called on Queenslanders to continue to get tested to stop any spread of the virus in the community.

"I urge everybody to remember to practice social distancing because we are not out of the woods yet," she said.

"But, if we stick together we will get through this together."

Queensland Health will have updates on contact tracing throughout the day.

Yesterday, there was one new case of coronavirus recorded in hotel quarantine.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/brisbane ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Sep 09, 2020 9:45 am

9 SEPT WA
WA nurses to fly home after serving Melbourne quarantine following coronavirus infection
A West Australian nurse who contracted coronavirus in Melbourne will be spared from having to serve two lots of hotel quarantine, with the State Government to arrange a special "clean" charter flight to bring her and six colleagues home.

Renee Freeman, 44, was among a team of nurses who travelled to Victoria last month to assist with the state's COVID-19 outbreak.

She had been working in aged care when she returned a positive test for COVID-19 on Sunday.

All of the nurses in the team were deemed close contacts and were required to isolate in Melbourne hotels, with Ms Freeman quarantined separately in a hotel for frontline workers.

WA Health Minister Roger Cook said the team members would see out their two-week quarantine period in Melbourne before flying back to Perth.

"They are already a few days into their quarantine experience," he said.

"Staying there is much better than returning to Perth, where they would need to start quarantine again."

'Safest and quickest way' home: Cook
Once the nurses have served their two weeks in isolation, a specially chartered flight will collect them from Melbourne.

It will be staffed by West Australian crew members.

"This flight will be a clean flight with crew leaving from WA, collecting the nurses and returning directly to Western Australia," Mr Cook said.

"By returning in this way, they will not be required to undertake a further 14 days quarantine in Western Australia.

"This will provide the safest and quickest way of getting them back home."

The Minister said the plan had been agreed to by the nursing team and if all went to plan, they could be back in Perth by September 21.

WA's deputy chief health officer Robyn Lawrence spoke to the affected workers this morning to ensure they were comfortable with the course of action.

She said Ms Freeman's symptoms were mild and she was hopeful she would be able to fly home in the coming weeks.

"Universally they thought it was an excellent plan," Dr Lawrence said.

"They have no other immediate needs at the minute.

"They feel supported and look forward to returning to WA as soon as they are able to."

Nurse left 'very scared' after diagnosis
Ms Freeman's mother, Michele Freeman, said her daughter had been struggling but seemed better today.

"Monday when she found out she was positive, she was very, very distressed, and then the symptoms started and she was very scared," she said.

"But she's pretty good today, her friends on the team over there are keeping her spirits up, doing silly things and buying presents and really doing a good job."

Michele said she had been very disappointed when the WA Government had not been able to say how it would get her daughter safely home, and she welcomed today's outcome.

"To know there'll be no isolating when she comes back and just comes straight off the plane will be great," she said.

Ms Freeman's sister, Lara Freeman, said it had been a terrifying few days, but she was also pleased with the plan to get the team home.

"We're a very close-knit family, we don't really go a day or two without either speaking to each other or seeing each other, so we have been in constant contact via Facetime and messages and things," she said.

"But knowing she's sick and I can't actually get to her, physically, to help her is probably the hardest part.

"Also trying to support her daughter who's taking it quite badly as well, and [Renee's son is] not doing very well either."

She said despite what happened, Ms Freeman did not regret having signed up to go to Victoria, and imagined she would be back at work after a brief rest if all went according to plan.

"We did have a discussion as a family as to how everybody felt about it, and it was quite a lengthy discussion," she said.

"But at the end of the day it was something that she felt she wanted to do, and she also felt that if WA was in the same situation as Victoria that they would want to help us as well.

"She's going to take a week or two off and just see how she feels and then she'll definitely want to get back into it."

Premier praises 'heroic' nurses as ANF backs plan
Premier Mark McGowan thanked the nurses for their service.

"Obviously it's very traumatic and concerning for the families and individuals involved," he said.

"The nurses themselves have done the right thing by Australia, by Victoria and by Western Australia.

"They have been heroic in what they've done, gone over to help their fellow citizens in a difficult environment, and they deserve all of our thanks."

Australian Nursing Federation state secretary Mark Olson welcomed the Government's plan, saying it would offer some confidence to other workers who were considering putting their hand up to travel interstate.

"First of all the nurses are happy with the outcome, and that's the most important thing," he said.

"Second of all it means that our 35,000 members, if any of them are thinking of volunteering in future, they know that this Government will do what's necessary to get them home should things not go according to plan."

But he said a concrete plan should have been in place, and should have been clearly communicated, before the nurses travelled interstate.

"The Government didn't have a plan, the bureaucrats … did not have a plan for these nurses going in," he said.

"I think that's just a complete failure on their part, however it looks like they've now got a plan they can reproduce when required.

"We don't know where this pandemic is going but we do know that all the states are going to have to help each other, and we need to remove those obstacles that stop people volunteering."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Mining giant Rio Tinto announces 300 jobs
Rio Tinto has announced 300 new jobs, with generous relocation packages on offer for new employees moving to Western Australia from interstate.

So far this year more than 1,500 people have been hired for the iron ore division in Perth, the Pilbara region, Busselton, Albany and Broome.

The mining giant, which will prioritise candidates from WA, is investing $60million in training and development next year, including 150 apprentices and trainees.
The announcement comes after calls from Premier Mark McGowan for the mining industry to permanently relocate their 6,000 FIFO workers from Australia's east coast.

Mr McGowan on Wednesday said BHP 'has set the benchmark' and called on the mining industry to 'follow BHP's lead'.

'What it means is more people with big incomes coming to live in Western Australia - build houses here, raise their families here and spend their money here,' he said.

'It means the incomes from the mining sector will stay in Western Australia and that's a great thing.

Mr McGowan said the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted issues with importing workers from interstate and overseas.

WA is a near monopoly producer of Australia's biggest export iron ore, the commodity used to make steel.

Image
Ms McGowan on Wednesday said BHP 'has set the benchmark' and called on the mining industry to 'follow BHP's lead'

The state Labor government conservatively rakes in $5billion a year from iron ore royalties.

National iron ore exports are worth more than $100billion a year, with WA home to 98 per cent of Australia's iron ore reserves, meaning the state rakes in about $38,000 per resident from those mineral deposits alone.

Two-thirds of that goes to China, Australia's biggest trading partner.

Broken down again, iron ore last year made up 43 per cent of Australia's exports to China by value.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

BHP to axe interstate FIFO work as mining industry conforms to WA's 'hard borders'
WA Premier, Mark McGowan, has welcomed BHP's decision to put Western Australia first
BHP will shift much of its interstate FIFO workforce to Western Australia in the face of the state's border restrictions, requiring new operational employees to live in the state or be willing to move there.

The move is in response to pressure from the state government, which has urged WA's resources sector to relocate its 7000-strong interstate workforce to reduce the risk of COVID-19 entering the state.
efore the pandemic interstate mine workers, a majority living in Queensland, supplemented WA's workforce.

But BHP will now give preference to West Australian job applicants for operational jobs in its iron ore, nickel and petroleum operations, with some exceptions for maintenance and project based jobs.
All job advertisements will stipulate the requirement that candidates must live in or be willing to move to WA for the duration of their employment.

The company has offered financial assistance for interstate employees to temporarily relocate to WA, which has resulted in over 800 employees moving to the state.

The resources giant also offered incentives for employees already on the books willing to move to WA permanently.

Premier Mark McGowan has been on record urging resources companies to do more to move workers to WA or to employ WA workers first.

He said BHP had set a new benchmark for the rest of the industry, and encouraged other mining companies to follow.

Mr McGowan said the move would have a positive impact across the state's economy, with more income generated from mining staying in WA.

"It means more West Australians will be employed in our resources industry," he said.

"I look forward to more people making WA their home, just like I did when I was in the Navy and relocated to WA.

"We don’t believe flying in workers from over east is sustainable any longer."

After the state closed its borders in April, the industry was forced to negotiate travel exemptions and strict quarantines for its interstate workers.

"This is the time for the resources industry to rethink the way it employs workers in WA and move interstate workers here," Mr McGowan said.

"WA workers should be first in line for WA jobs. There are many West Australians that can perform the roles needed in the sector."

Mr McGowan has asked the federal government to assist in helping it fill jobs in regional areas while the WA border is closed, calling on Prime Minister Scott Morrison to allow West Australians to keep their JobKeeper payments if they take up employment outside of major population centres.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/western ... 55tpg.html

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
<< NOT BEFORE TIME >>
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Sep 09, 2020 9:50 am

9 SEPT TAS
Tasmanian car dealership reports downturn in new-car sales, used cars in 'tight supply'
Car sales are down around the country, with about a quarter of a million fewer new cars being sold this year, according to Tasmanian car dealership owner Errol Stewart.

That also directly impacts your chance of picking up a privately sold used car for a bargain price.

Gone, at least in the meantime, are cars by the side of the road with a phone number and asking price scrawled on the windscreen that are offered for private sale.

Car dealers are increasingly buying direct from the public due to trade-in car numbers decreasing and their new-car sales declining.

If you are selling a car via an online sales platform Mr Stewart says it is probably a dealer contacting you "because we need the stock".

"It is a very good time if someone wants to come in and bring a trade-in because we're not getting the trade-ins," he said.

"It's not just our business, but every car dealer across the state is in exactly the same position.

"Used cars are in tight supply," Mr Stewart said.

Less new cars coming into the country
Mr Stewart said people were not buying as many new cars and less new cars were coming into the country.

"Just about every manufacturer has had some shortages in one form or another, so there are not as many new vehicles coming in to Australia," he said.

"Consequently, people are seeing less new cars for sale, and saying, 'I can't get the new car I want, so I'll buy a used car'."

Those who have bought a new car in the past would, more often than not, trade it in for their current car, and accordingly, less second-hand cars are being made available to the dealers.

"We're not selling as many new cars, but we are selling plenty of used cars," Mr Stewart said.

"We've gone from about 12,000 back to 9,000 sales so there are 3,000 cars that haven't been sold as new cars in Tasmania."

Strong luxury car market
The new cars that are still being bought are top-end vehicles.

Mr Stewart believes that this is because the customers who are in the market for luxury cars are not spending their money on travelling due to the coronavirus.

"People who buy the upper-end products are not travelling and they have more disposable income," he said.

"They might normally say, 'We're going overseas,' and spend $20,000 to $30,000 but they are putting that towards buying a car.

"Instead of buying a run-of-the-mill car they might buy a more luxurious brand.

"The luxury market, particularly in Hobart, is much stronger for us than last year."

Superannuation used to buy cars
Mr Stewart is also seeing purchases of new cars made with superannuation that has been accessed during the pandemic.

"A customer may have taken $10,000 out of super, saved up another $10,000 and borrowed $10,000 to buy a $30,000 car," he said.

"That's certainly been very evident — and fairly so — it is their money at the end of the day."

While there are changes happening in the used car market, Mr Stewart is confident that consumers can still find what they need.

"I'd just shop around and do your homework," he said.

"There are plenty of good cars and it's still a very competitive market place."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/markets ... d=msedgdhp

RURAL
Tasmania hoping to bring in interstate fruit pickers
There's renewed optimism Tasmania will be allowed to bring in fruit pickers from other states in time for the berry harvest.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

AGED CARE
More than 30 coronavirus complaints in five months, but just one spot check for Tasmanian aged care
he federal aged care regulator conducted just one spot check on Tasmanian facilities in five months — despite receiving more than 30 complaints related to the deadly coronavirus pandemic during that time.

New figures tabled in Federal Parliament show the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission received 98 complaints about Tasmanian aged care facilities between March and early August, 31 of them related to COVID-19.

Only one out of five site visits in that time was an unannounced check.

In the same period, a 79-year-old woman who lived at Melaleuca Home for the Aged in East Devonport died after testing positive for the virus. That home has not been visited by the regulator since last November.

Federal Labor aged care spokeswoman Julie Collins said it was "completely unacceptable" that spot checks on Tasmanian facilities had only started last month.

"The Minister [Richard Colbeck] is Tasmanian," Ms Collins said.

"You would've thought that he would have some idea of what's happening here in Tasmania and he himself would be concerned there were not spot checks done here in Tasmania."

Council On The Ageing Tasmania chief executive Sue Leitch said while she welcomed 37 recent unannounced visits, they were "well overdue".

"We've certainly had people contacting us that are concerned about a range of different things during the COVID infection period, and not necessarily related just to COVID infection control," Ms Leitch said.

In a statement, Aged Care Quality and Safety Commissioner Janet Anderson said processes related to spot checks changed between mid-March to June to minimise infection risks.

All of the state's aged care providers had been assessed for COVID-19 preparedness over the phone, Ms Anderson said.

On the 98 complaints related to Tasmania, Ms Anderson said: "One complaint can consist of more than one issue raised.

"[More than 100] complaint issues associated with these complaints were finalised to the satisfaction of the complainant and/or further monitoring or determining that the service had taken steps to address the issues."

Senator Colbeck said all complaints had been finalised.

"I am confident [the commission's] work will continue, with an emphasis on ensuring the quality of care for senior Australians, in what is a challenging time for the aged care sector," he said.

'Really scary time' for aged care home
Speaking publicly for the first time since Tasmania's deadly north-west outbreak, Melaleuca Home for the Aged chief executive Simone Collins said it had been a "devastating" period for everyone.

More than 20 staff were quarantined during the April period, meaning agencies were required to supply interstate and intrastate help.

Ms Collins it was near impossible to source additional personal protective equipment until the Federal Government appointed a coordinator specifically to help with supply.

She praised state and federal authorities for their swift involvement after a staff member tested positive and said the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission was in phone contact during and after the broader north-west Tasmanian coronavirus cluster.

"It was a really scary time but at the end of it we got through because we worked together," Ms Collins said.

The Melaleuca resident who died was believed to have contracted the virus from the staff member, who worked at three aged care facilities as well as the North West Regional Hospital.

Each of the three aged care homes — Melaleuca, Eliza Purton Home in West Ulverstone and Coroneagh Park at Penguin — isolated and tested all employees and residents after the staff member returned a positive test.

Melaleuca had been screening staff for one month before the unwell but asymptomatic employee entered the home.

"Most people have the virus before they even know it, and that was the unfortunate situation with us," Ms Collins said.

"That's the way the virus spreads and that is my greatest concern, that you've got it before you know it and the damage has been done."

Premier Peter Gutwein has repeatedly pointed to the preparedness of the state's aged care sector to deal with a second outbreak as one reason to keep Tasmanian borders closed.

Ms Collins said surge staffing was a consideration at her 48-bed facility, with about 20 per cent of its staff casual workers.

The home has plans "constantly under review" and ready to be enacted if coronavirus hits the community or the home again.

"We as an organisation are ensuring that if there is community transmission that we would not engage staff who are working at other facilities as well," Ms Collins said.

Ms Leitch said the high number of casual workers in aged care was a concern in Tasmania, adding a second outbreak would be a "real test".

"It's a complex area and certainly something we need to be aware of," Ms Leitch said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
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Posts: 12574
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Sep 09, 2020 10:01 am

9 SEPT SA
Adelaide Film Festival to defy COVID-19's effect on the arts, welcoming audiences back to cinemas
Adelaide Film Festival is set to defy the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, becoming one of the first events to welcome audiences back to cinemas despite the global crisis.

Adelaide-raised movie star Tilda Cobham-Hervey's movie, I Am Woman, is one of the films set to screen at the festival.

The actor said she was prepared to serve a double period of quarantine in Australia to escape America's continuing COVID-19 crisis and disastrous bushfires in California.

She will be out of quarantine in time for the biennial film festival next month — one of the first in the sector which has been decimated by the pandemic.

"I got pretty sick of being in America; we were basically in quarantine for about five months, so I didn't actually see real humans apart from my partner for five months," she told ABC News.

"A lot of people are choosing to ignore it exists and I think that can be quite hard when there isn't sort of hope or a clear plan as to how it can get better; that got pretty exhausting after a while."

The pandemic has wreaked havoc with Cobham-Hervey's 2020 plans.

"A lot of films that we were sort of talking about at the beginning of the year are now no longer able to happen and we're not really sure if they will get back up again," she said.

"It's sort of impossible to film in Los Angeles; I know some productions are starting to go back with some very strict rules and protocols, but it's very challenging."

Challenging role for actor
The pandemic also wrecked the release plans for Cobham-Hervey's latest film, I Am Woman, which saw her play the role of Australian singer Helen Reddy and her trip to the top.

It was her most challenging role yet, shot in just six weeks and requiring her to play Reddy from the ages of 24 to 48, often on the same shooting days.

The movie was sent to streaming early and is booming, while there has only been a limited cinematic release due to the pandemic.

The actor said screening the movie at the Adelaide Film Festival in front of family and friends will be a big moment.

"Incredibly nerve-wracking, still nervous about it — it was really hard playing a real person," she said.

"I'd sort of never done that before … she's such an extraordinary person and someone we all know and love."

Festival adopts COVID-safe cinema plan
The film festival is one of the first in the world to be able to show movies in cinemas.

It will adopt the checkerboard seating plan of about 50 per cent capacity in what will be a challenging debut for creative director Mat Kesting.

"We've been very careful with our box office forecasting and we've made adjustments to make that work," he said.

"I think everyone's really hungry for a great event.

"There are very few film festivals internationally that have been able to proceed, so there is indeed a great opportunity for extra buzz around and we're really quite lucky in South Australia to be able to proceed in the cinema."

The 2020 festival includes 22 world premieres, 27 Australian premieres and 54 feature films from more than 40 countries.

They include the Sundance-winning documentary The Painter and the Thief, and Australia's High Ground, which wowed audiences in Berlin.

There is also the film ShoPaapaa, a collaboration from Tasmanian duo Molly Reynolds and Rolf de Heer, which features disabled English-based artist Shekhar Bassi.

The film is one of the first to depict the year 2020 and how London in particular was hit by the coronavirus, before Black Lives Matter protests began.

"This was sort of intended to be a psychological vaccine, a psychological remedy to these tumultuous times," Reynolds said from her Tasmanian base.

So contemporary is the film that it is not finished yet, but the production team said it will be ready to be shown.

Mr Kesting said having the Adelaide Film Festival in cinemas was a blessing, as most new movies were being held back from mainstream release due to the pandemic.

"Until the cinemas can open in all markets, and that's the US and further afield, we'll see hold-backs, so South Australia is quite unique in that we're able to proceed in the cinema," he said.

As for Cobham-Hervey, she has no return date to her home in Los Angeles, and an industry she still struggles to feel totally comfortable in.

"It is a really tough business," she said.

"Particularly in America, the system of Hollywood and filmmaking, I still find pretty confusing and a lot of it I don't love — but I really love the work."

The Adelaide Film Festival runs from October 14 to 25.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

9 SEPT FEDERAL
Federal government to boost spending on new construction projects to create jobs
The federal government is planning for an immense boost in spending for the October budget to launch new construction projects which will create jobs and focus on long-term infrastructure.

The Sydney Morning Herald has reported Deputy Prime Minister Michal McCormack labelled water as a crucial part of the agenda which adds to existing projects worth $100 billion and is calling on state governments to back these plans.

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Events organiser on JobKeeper will be left with just $6 a day to eat
Image
A young event planner will be forced to live off just $6 a day for food when the federal government cuts JobKeeper payments later this month.

Sarah Marshall, 26, has been out of work during the COVID-19 pandemic, with the events and hospitality industries decimated by restrictions on public gatherings.

She signed on to the government's wage subsidy scheme that currently hands up to $1,500 a fortnight to workers losing out on work because of the coronavirus crisis.

But on September 27 the handout will be slashed to $1,200 per fortnight, despite the extension of Stage Four stay-at-home orders in Melbourne, where she lives.

The JobKeeper payment was a lifesaver for me, but it's a dramatic drop from what my full-time salary was,' Ms Marshalll told news.com.au.

'The drop again means I won't be able to afford my food for the week after paying my rent and my car loan, and I've got barely any savings after moving away from home at 19 and living in Sydney, now Melbourne.

'The cut of JobKeeper only adds on more stress to an already difficult situation.'

After tax is taken out of Ms Marshall's JobKeeper payment in three weeks time, she will receive about $540 a week.

Her rent is roughly $270 a week and her car loan costs $370 a month with an extra $100 for insurance, she said.

When Ms Marshall deducts money for essential bills like electricity and gas, she will be left with just $40 a week to pay for food - or about $6 a day.

The successful events organiser says she will be forced to ask her parents for money to survive.

To make matters worse, she's not able to visit her childhood friends and family in Western Australia due to state border closures.

Ms Marshall revealed she does not have a partner and lives alone, so feelings of isolation during lockdown have been compounded.

She said it's a struggle just to get out of bed in the morning.

Now, all her focus is centered around not falling into a 'huge slump'.

But Ms Marshall is able to apply for a top up in payments under the other subsidy scheme JobSeeker.

From September workers who are getting JobKeeper at a rate of $1,200 per fortnight may also be eligible for a part payment of JobSeeker which would bring in an extra $276 a fortnight.

This would leave Ms Marshall with about $25 per day for food.
The Victorian Labor government has been calling on Mr Morrison to introduce a program to that would assist Victorian workers during lockdown - which is set to continue until at least October 26 in metropolitan Melbourne.

So far, the federal government appears reluctant to keep shelling out the fortnightly $1,500 payments.

But one of Australia's leading economists says Mr Morrison will be left with no choice as the 'once in hundred years' economic crisis deepens.

'The government was hoping things would be bouncing back, people would be back in work and that everything was going to be brought back to normality,' Digital Finance Analytics principal Martin North told Daily Mail Australia on Wednesday.

'But I don't think it is going to be feasible for the government to try and ride it out because we are not just looking at a few months - this crisis could echo for up to five years.

'This cliff face is really stepping down dramatically... and we now have about one million people affected by greatly reduced income.

'It's not just Victoria. It's also happening more broadly in other states... so we have to find a way to support them through this.'

How are the support payments changing from September?
JOBKEEPER

* The $1500 fortnightly wage subsidy will continue until September 27

* From the end of September to January, JobKeeper will be reduced to $1200 for full-time workers and $750 for people working 20 hours or less

* From January to March, the full-time rate will be $1000 and part-time will reduce to $650

* Businesses turning over less than $1 billion will have to requalify for the program at both stages through showing a 30 per cent drop in revenue.

* Businesses with more than $1 billion in turnover have to demonstrate a 50 per cent fall

JOBSEEKER

* The elevated unemployment benefit will remain at $1100 a fortnight until September 27

* From that date until the end of the year the $550 coronavirus supplement will be cut by $300 to make the overall fortnightly payment $800

* People will be able to earn up to $300 without having their payment reduced

* The mutual obligation rules requiring people to search for four jobs a month will restart on August 4

* Penalties for people refusing a job offer will be reintroduced

* Job search requirements will increase in September when the assets test will also return

* The permanent JobSeeker rate to take effect from January next year will be announced in the October 6 budget.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

'Never too late' for an 'intervention' in Victoria: Deputy CMO
Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Nick Coastworth says it is "never too late" to have an "intervention" given Victoria could not continue with its current systems and methods of coping with its COVID-19 second wave.

Dr Coatsworth welcomed the Andrews government's decision to send Victorian health authorities to New South Wales to examine its effective contact tracing system.

"In any system, if control is lost, you have to understand why and make changes," he said.

"It would be the expectation of all Australians, the Victorian public health response was reformed in some way."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Australia’s state by state coronavirus lockdown rules and restrictions explained
Australians had been slowly emerging from Covid-19 lockdowns since the federal government announced a three-stage plan in May to ease restrictions across the country, but from 8 July the Melbourne metropolitan area and Mitchell shire immediately to the north returned to a stage three lockdown for six weeks.
After consistently high case numbers despite the lockdown, the Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, announced further restrictions for the state. From 2 August, metropolitan Melbourne entered a six-week stage four lockdown, while a stage three lockdown took effect across regional Victoria and Mitchell shire from 6 August.

Here we try to answer some of the most common questions people have about the laws in each state, based on the information current as of 26 August.

These answers should not be treated as legal advice. This article will be updated as new restrictions are announced, implemented, or repealed.

Here, you can find the official state and territory restriction guides for NSW, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, Western Australia, South Australia, the Northern Territory and the ACT.

Victoria coronavirus outbreak: what are the rules and do they apply to me?
Melbourne entered stage four restrictions from 6pm on Sunday 2 August, a statewide mandatory mask policy took effect from midnight Sunday 2 August, and regional Victoria entered stage three restrictions from Thursday 6 August.

You can read all about the rules and recommendations around masks here.

Related: Australia's face mask advice: are reusable or washable masks best, and what are the rules?

You can read all about Melbourne stage 4 restrictions and coronavirus lockdown rules here.

You can read all about regional Victoria stage 3 coronavirus restrictions and lockdown rules here.

Details on restrictions in other states and territories can be found below.

How many people can I have over at my house?
New South Wales – On Sunday 19 July, the government issued advice asking people not to host, or go to, a gathering of more than 10 people at home. But the law in NSW currently allows 20 people from different households to visit. There is no limit to the number of guests you can have over per day, as long as there are no more than 20 at a time and guests can stay overnight.

Queensland – On Saturday 22 August, the government issued new advice in response to recent Covid-19 positive cases. Brisbane City, Cherbourg, Gold Coast, Goondiwindi, Ipswich, Logan City, Scenic Rim Regional, Somerset Region, South Burnett, Southern Downs, Lockyer Valley, Moreton Bay, Toowoomba, Western Downs and Redland City local government areas have been listed as restricted areas. Gatherings at homes in these areas are now restricted to a maximum of 10 people. Gatherings at the homes in all other parts of Queensland are now restricted to 30 people.

Tasmania – You can have up to 20 visitors over.

Western Australia – Since 27 June, you can have as many guests over as long as there is no more than one person per two square metres.

South Australia – From midnight 5 August, up to 10 people can visit your home (reduced from 50).

Northern Territory – There is no limit on how many people can gather indoors or outdoors, but you must keep 1.5 metres between you and anyone with whom you don’t live.

ACT – There is no limit on household visitors.

How many people can gather outside?
New South Wales – Currently public gatherings of up to 20 people are allowed. On 1 July community sport for children and adults returned, including contact sports. The Public Health Act says organisers must ensure that venues do not exceed the four square metre per person rule, up to a limit of 500 participants (which includes players, officials and spectators). Associations must also have a Covid 19-safety plan.

Queensland – Brisbane City, Cherbourg, Gold Coast, Goondiwindi, Ipswich, Logan City, Scenic Rim Regional, Somerset Region, South Burnett, Southern Downs, Lockyer Valley, Morteon Bay, Toowoomba, Western Downs and Redland City local government areas have been listed as restricted areas. Gatherings in public spaces are restricted to a maximum of 10 people, except for businesses operating with a Covid-safe plan. Gatherings in all other parts of Queensland are restricted to a maximum of 30 people, again these limits do not apply to businesses operating with a Covid-safe plan.

Tasmania – Up to 500 people are allowed in an undivided outdoor space.

Western Australia – There is no limit on the number of people allowed at public gatherings.

South Australia – There is no limit on the number of people allowed, as long as there is no more than one person per two square metres.

Northern Territory – There are no limits on gathering in the NT, but you should maintain physical distancing.

ACT – Up to 100 people can gather together outdoors.

Can I visit someone in an aged care facility?
Please note that in every state, all visitors must have received this year’s flu vaccination, unless they have a documented medical contraindication to receiving the vaccine. Visitors cannot enter an aged care facility if they have recently been overseas, been in recent contact with a confirmed case of Covid-19, or are feeling unwell.

New South Wales – NSW Health provides guidelines for residential aged care facilities. Residents should only have one daily visit with a maximum of two visitors (immediately family or close friends), no large group visits or gatherings, and all visits should be short and take place in the resident’s room, outdoors or a specified area (instead of a communal area).

Queensland – Visiting restrictions are in place for residential aged care facilities in 15 local government areas – including Brisbane City and Gold Coast City. Residents are not allowed any personal visitors, as well as other restrictions. In all other areas aged care residents can have up to two visitors at any one time. There is no limit on the number of visits allowed in a day or the length of each visit.

Tasmania – As of Monday 22 June, residents in aged care facilities can have multiple visits of two people, with no restrictions on the length of visits or the total number of visitors they receive in a day. Residents are permitted to go outside on trips, and hairdressers can be allowed in. Children under 16 are also allowed in. Additional visitors are allowed for the purpose of end of life support, or if needed to reduce distress and confusion given a residents’ medical condition.

Western Australia – Each resident in an aged care facility can have one care and support visit a day, with up to two visitors at a time. Only immediate social supports, like family members and close friends, professional help or advocacy services can attend.

South Australia – Residents can have one visit per day. Up to two people can visit them at the same time for the purpose of providing care and support. As of 20 June, children under the age of 16 years can visit, and aged care facilities can approve additional visits if this is appropriate or necessary.

Northern Territory – Residents can have up to two visitors at a time, and visits should be kept short. Children aged 16 years and under are not allowed to visit those in aged care facilities, except for special circumstances.

ACT – Residents can have one visit per day, of up to two people, for the purposes of providing care and support. Visits cannot last more than two hours. Those aged 16 years or younger can only visit on compassionate grounds for the purpose of visiting a resident at the end of life.

Can I eat at a restaurant, cafe or pub?
New South Wales – Yes, but from Friday, 17 July, new limits applied on how man people can be inside cafes, bistros and restaurants. Group bookings are limited to 10 people, with venues observing the four square metre per person rule up to a cap of 300 people at any one time. A dedicated marshal must oversee social distancing at all venues with a capacity greater than 250 at all times, while a marshal is only required during lunch and dinner peaks at hotels with a capacity less than 250. All diners must provide their name and contact details, including a phone number or email address, to allow for contact tracing. Food courts have reopened.

Queensland – Yes, restaurants, cafes, pubs, registered clubs, RSL clubs and hotels (with a Covid-Safe Checklist) can seat any number of patrons as long as the four square metres per person limit is observed. Venues with a floor space less than 200 square metres can have a maximum of 50 people, not exceeding a limit of one person for every two square metres.

Tasmania – Up to 250 are allowed in an undivided space, as long as there is no more than one person per two square metres. Up to 500 people are allowed in an undivided outdoor space, density requirements also permitting.

Western Australia – Yes, cafes and restaurants (including in pubs, bars, hotels, casinos, clubs) can open to up to seated diners, with one person per every two square metres. Venues are allowed to serve food and alcohol to non-seated patrons. There is no requirement for businesses to maintain a patron register.

South Australia – Yes, as of 29 June, restaurants, cafes, pubs, food courts, nightclubs and casinos can open, as well as standing hospitality venues. There is no limit on the number of people allowed, as long as there is no more than one person per two square metres. However, alcohol can only be served to seated patrons from 5 August. Communal food, like buffets and salad bars, are not permitted.

Northern Territory – Yes. All businesses are allowed to reopen as long as they have a Covid-19 plan. The two-hour limit has been lifted, meaning night clubs can reopen. You will be able to purchase alcohol from a bar. Licensed gaming activities, including TAB, will start again.

ACT – Yes, restaurants, cafes and other hospitality venues offering seated dining can host up to 100 patrons in each indoor or outdoor space, as long as there is one person per four square metres. This limit excludes staff. Bars, pubs, and clubs can serve alcohol in groups of up to 10 seated patrons, without a meal. From 10 July, food courts will be allowed to open to seated patrons.

How far can I travel on holiday within my state?
New South Wales – There are no limits on travelling within the state, including for a holiday. A number of caravan parks and camping grounds have reopened.

Queensland – You are allowed to travel anywhere in Queensland for recreational purposes, other than in certain designated remote communities. Camping and holiday accommodation sites, including caravan parks, are allowed to open.

Tasmania – There is no limit on where you can go within the state.

Western Australia – Residents are allowed to leave their homes for recreational activities including picnics, fishing, boating or camping. Recreational travel to most nearby regions is now allowed, except to some remote Aboriginal communities.

South Australia – There are no restrictions on travel within South Australia. Some Aboriginal communities across the state have chosen to close access to their townships and lands to non-essential outside visitors. Non-essential visitors to these communities have to quarantine for 14 days and be granted permission.

Northern Territory – There are no restrictions on travel within the Northern Territory.

ACT – There is no limit on where you can travel.

Can I visit another state?
New South Wales – As of Friday 7 August, residents returning from Victoria will be required to go into mandatory hotel quarantine for 14 days. From Saturday 8 August, Queensland has closed its border to people from NSW or the ACT and anyone who attempts to enter without a permit will be turned away at the border. Residents can travel to Tasmania if they haven’t been in a designated hotspot, but they will be required to undertake government-supervised quarantine. Only those with exemptions can travel to Western Australia. Residents travelling to South Australia will be required to self-isolate for 14 days. Those travelling to the Northern Territory who have been in a declared hotspot will be required to undertake government-supervised quarantine at a cost of $2,500 per person. The entire greater Sydney region is now classified as a hotspot.

Queensland – Since 10 July, anyone can enter Queensland unless they have been in a Covid-19 hotspot in the previous 14 days, in which case they will be refused entry. This includes anyone who has visited any part of Victoria, , NSW and the ACT. Residents travelling to Tasmania will be required to self-isolate for 14 days when they arrive in the state and people from Queensland can’t travel to WA unless they have an exemption.

Tasmania – From 7 August visitors from South Australia, the Northern Territory and Western Australia may enter without going into quarantine, but they must apply first and declare that they have not been in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland or the ACT in the preceding 14 days. Travellers from the “safety bubble” states will have to undergo a mandatory health check upon arrival, and anyone with coronavirus symptoms will have to take a mandatory test, and remain in hotel or home quarantine until the results are received. All travellers from the other states, including returning residents, must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Non-Tasmanian residents must carry out their quarantine in government-provided accommodation.

Western Australia – You cannot enter Western Australia unless you are granted an exemption on application. On Sunday, 20 July, the WA government tightened the rules around exemptions for anyone who has travelled from, or through, NSW or Victoria. There is no date for when the interstate border will reopen.

South Australia – People from Queensland, WA, the NT and Tasmania can enter South Australia without having to quarantine for 14 days. The South Australian government has not set a date to welcome visitors from other states. South Australian residents will not be allowed to return to their state from Victoria unless they are essential travellers. As of 28 July, this restriction was hardened, removing the ability for a resident to return from Victoria and quarantine for 14 days. From 21-28 August, people who live close to the border who come and go for school, work or for shopping are not allowed into South Australia unless they can comply with essential traveller requirements. From 28 August, the 40km buffer zone will be reinstated.

Northern Territory – You can enter the Northern Territory provided you fill out a border entry form up to 72 hours from entering and present your application upon entry. You will be required to legally declare you have not been in an area the state considers a Covid-19 hotspot in the past 28 days. Penalties of up to $5,000 fines and up to three years in prison apply for providing misleading information on this border entry form.

However travellers from hotspots – including Victoria, Greater Sydney and Port Stephens in NSW – cannot enter the NT freely. They will have to complete 14 days of mandatory self-quarantine, at their own expense, which is $2,500 per person. Residents returning to the NT from these hotspots will be made to undergo the same quarantine. Greater Brisbane and the Gold Coast were previously included in this list, but were removed on 4 September.

ACT – People who are not ACT residents may not enter the ACT from Victoria, unless they hold an exemption. ACT residenets are required to enter quarantine until 14 days after leaving Victoria.

How many people can attend a wedding or funeral?
New South Wales – From 24 July weddings and corporate events are limited to 150 people, subject to the four square metre rule. Funerals and places of worship are limited to 100 people. People attending weddings and corporate events must remain seated. “No dancing, no singing, no mingling,” the premier Gladys Berejiklian has said.However, when it comes to funerals, places of public worship, funeral homes, or crematoriums can have up to 50 attendees, ignoring the four square metre rule, provided non-household contacts can maintain 1.5 metres of physical distance. Those attending will have to provide their name and contact details for contact tracing, if necessary.

Queensland – No more than 100 people are allowed to attend weddings and funerals conducted at a professional venue. Private wedding and funeral services performed in public areas and spaces in the restricted local government areas can have a maximum of 10 people attend including the bride, groom and marriage celebrant. Private wedding services performed in public areas and spaces not within restricted local government areas can have a maximum of 30 people attend including the bride, groom, wedding party and marriage celebrant.

Tasmania – Up to 250 people can gather in an undivided indoor space, and up to 500 people can gather in an undivided outdoor space. In both cases, the number of people present must also not exceed one person per two square metres.

Western Australia – There is no limit on the number of people who can gather together, as long as there is no more than one person per two square metres.

South Australia – Weddings can have up to 75 attendees, not including the celebrant, venue staff or any other person required to facilitate the wedding. Up to 75 can also attend a funeral. This excludes those officiating the funeral or any staff required to carry out the funeral. If the ceremony involves food or drinks, no shared utensils can be used. Social distancing must be observed.

Northern Territory – There is no limit on the number of attendees.

ACT – Up to 100 guests can attend weddings or funerals, as long as there is no more than one person per four square metres. Under stage three rules, expected to be introduced in July, attendance limits will require four square metres per person.

Can I go to church?
New South Wales – The number of people in a public place of worship must not exceed 100, and the four square metre physical distancing rule must be observed. The state’s chief health officer has urged congregations to reconsider activities that might spread the virus-like group singing and passing round of collection baskets.

Queensland – Yes. Places of worship can have one person per four square metres. However, if the place of worship is less than 200 square metres, then the venue can have one person per two square metres, up to a total of 50 people at either private or public services.

Tasmania – Yes, up to 250 people can gather in an undivided indoor space, as long as there are two square metres per person.

Western Australia – Yes, attendance is limited only by the two square metre rule.

South Australia – Yes, attendance is limited only by the two square metre rule.

Northern Territory – Yes, but you can only be there for less than two hours. There is no limit on how many people can attend a place of worship at the same time.

ACT – Up to 100 people, the four square metre rule permitting, can attend religious ceremonies and places of worship, not counting those conducting the ceremony.

Are schools back in session?
New South Wales – Yes, all students went back to school full-time on Monday 25 May. New restrictions for public schools were announced on 17 August, including the banning of graduation ceremonies, formals and choirs.

Queensland – Yes, all students are back at school as of Monday 25 May.

Tasmania – Yes, as of 9 June, all students have returned to the classroom.

Western Australia – Yes, all students returned on 18 May. Parents and visitors are also now allowed on school grounds. Events and activities such as assemblies, excursions, choirs, exams, sports training and swimming classes can resume, in line with distancing requirements. School libraries can also open for up to 100 people in a shared space at a time. From 27 June, all gathering limits, including the 100/300 rule, will be removed.

South Australia – Yes, they reopened for term 2.

Northern Territory – Yes, since 20 April all NT students have been expected to physically attend school.

ACT – Yes, all students have returned to school as of 2 June.

Can I shop for clothes and other ‘non-essential’ items?
New South Wales – Yes.

Queensland – Yes, retail shopping for non-essential items is back on.

Tasmania – Yes, you are allowed to leave your home to use businesses or services that are allowed to operate, which includes retail stores.

Western Australia – Yes.

South Australia – Yes.

Northern Territory – Yes.

ACT – Yes.

Are salons, spas and other beauty services open?
New South Wales – Hairdressers, barbers, as well as nail waxing, tanning and beauty salons, and tattoo and massage parlours can open, but must allow four square metres per person within the premises and should minimise personal contact with the customer.

Queensland – Yes, beauty therapy and nail salons, tanning salons, tattoo parlours, spas, and non-therapeutic massage parlours (with a Covid-Safe checklist) can open to up to 100 people on site.

Tasmania – Yes, hairdressers and barbers can open. Beauty services and day spas can reopen withno cap on the number of people allowed inside, as long as there is one person per four square metres. Saunas and bathhouses will be allowed to open from 13 July.

Western Australia – Yes, all beauty services, including nail, tanning and waxing salons, as well as saunas, bath houses, wellness centres, float centres, spas and massage centres may reopen, for up to one person per two square metres.

South Australia – Yes, hairdressers and barbers, along with beauty salons, nail and tattoo parlours, non-therapeutic massage providers, spas, saunas and bathing can open, as long as the total number of people on site doesn’t exceed one person per two square metres.

Northern Territory – Yes, hairdressers, and nail, massage and tanning salons, tattoo and piercing parlours and any other beauty services can open.

ACT – Yes, hairdressers and barbers are allowed. Beauty therapy businesses, including nail salons, tanning and waxing services, day spas, including massage parlous and tattoo businesses are allowed to reopen to up to 100 people, but cannot exceed one person per four square metres, including staff. They must keep a record of customers to enable contact tracing, if needed.

What about cinemas, entertainment venues, museums and libraries?
New South Wales - Museums, galleries and libraries, National Trust and Historic Houses Trust properties are allowed to reopen to guests, as long as four square metres is allowed per person and they have a Covid-19 safety plan. For venues with 40,000 seats or less, attendance to a ticketed event with allocated seating must not exceed 25% of capacity. The total number of people in a major recreational facility hosting a non-ticketed or non-seated event must not exceed one person per four square metres (excluding staff), to a maximum of 500 people. Alcohol can only be served to seated patrons.

Queensland – Libraries, museums, art galleries, historic sites, indoor cinemas, concert venues, theatres, arenas, auditoriums, stadiums, nightclubs, outdoor amusement parks, zoos and arcades are allowed to host up one person per four square metres if the venue is larger than 200 square metres. If it is smaller than 200 square metres, they can host one person per two square metres but no more than 50 people.

Tasmania – Up to 250 people can attend each undivided space in indoor recreational facilities, such as libraries, arcades, play centres, cinemas, museums, national institutions, historic sites, and galleries, the two square metre rule permitting. Up to 500 people are also allowed per undivided outdoor space.

Western Australia – Community facilities, libraries, galleries, museums, theatres, auditoriums, cinemas, and concert venues can all reopen, along with Perth Zoo, wildlife and amusement parks, arcades, skate rinks and indoor play centres. All venues can have as many people, as long as there is one person per two square metres. The two square metre rule only includes staff if the venue holds more than 500 patrons. There is a 50% capacity cap on major sport and entertainment venues, such as the Optus Stadium, HBF Park and RAC Arena. All events are allowed, except for large scale, multi-stage music festivals. Unseated performances can go ahead at concert halls, live music venues, bars, pubs and nightclubs, and the casino gaming floor will be allowed to reopen under temporary restrictions.

South Australia – Libraries, community and youth centres, cinemas, theatres, galleries and museums can have one patron per two square metres. Indoor play centres, arcades and amusement parks are also allowed to open. Swimming in public pools is allowed.

Northern Territory – Public libraries, art galleries, museums, zoos, cinemas and theatres, music halls, nightclubs, amusement parks, community centres, stadiums, sporting facility and similar entertainment venues can open.

ACT – Up to 100 people are allowed at cinemas and movie theatres, indoor amusement centres, arcades, outdoor and indoor play centres, betting agencies, outdoor amusements and attractions, community and youth centres, galleries, museums, national institutions, libraries historic sites and zoos. There can only be one person per four square metres throughout the venue. Organised tour groups of up to 20 people (excluding staff) will be permitted, as long as they run for less than two hours. Audiences must remain seated at live performances.

Can I go to the gym? What else can I do for exercise?
New South Wales – Yes, gyms, fitness centres, and studios (like dance studios) are allowed to open for up to 20 people per class. The total number of people in a facility must not exceed one person per four square metres, excluding staff. Indoor pools and saunas will also be allowed to reopen to up to 20 people. Community sporting competitions and training can go ahead as long as the number in a facility does not exceed one person per four square metres, excluding staff, to a maximum of 500 people. You can use outdoor gym equipment in public places, with caution, and engage in recreational activities like fishing, hunting and boating.

Queensland – Yes, gyms, health clubs, yoga studios and community sports clubs can open for up to one person per two square metres up to a total of 50 people if the indoor venue is 200 square metres or less. Indoor venues larger than 200 square metres can have one person per four square metres. People can gather outside, play non-contact sport, and participate in outdoor group training and boot camps with physical distancing . Parks, playgrounds, skateparks and pools are open with physical distancing rules.

Tasmania – Yes, up to 250 people are allowed in an undivided indoor venue, as long as there are two square metres per person. A multi-purpose Outdoor gathering limits have increased to 500. Full contact training and full competition sport (contact and non-contact) is allowed, as is the sharing of equipment, change rooms and other facilities.

Western Australia – Gyms, health clubs, and indoor sports centres can reopen for up to one person per two square metres. Gyms can operate unstaffed but must undergo regular cleaning. Contact sport and training can also recommence, and playgrounds, outdoor gym equipment and skate parks can be used.

South Australia – Yes, gyms and indoor fitness classes can operate, subject to the one person per two square metres rule. Outdoor and indoor training and competitions for non-contact is allowed, as is the use of golf courses, tennis courts and public gym equipment.

Northern Territory – Yes. Gyms, fitness studios, and indoor training activities like Cross Fit are allowed to operate. You can also officiate, participate and support team sports, like football, basketball, soccer and netball.

ACT – Yes. Indoor gyms and fitness centres are allowed to reopen to up to 100 people in any enclosed space, as long as there is only one person per four square metres. Patrons are allowed to take part in circuit training, individual weight training, and use gym equipment. That includes yoga, barre, pilates, and spin facilities, boot camps, personal training, swimming pools, organised sport activities, and dance classes. Up to 20 people can take part in outdoor bootcamps and other non-contact training or sport. Full contact training for sport, dance and martial arts, as well as circuit training, is allowed. Communal facilities, such as change rooms, can reopen if a risk assessment has been done and a strict cleaning regime has been put in place.

Who decides if I am breaking the new laws?
Generally, enforcement will be left up to the discretion of police officers.

States have expressed different approaches, for example, the ACT says it will be issuing a warning in the first instance, while Victoria has adopted a more hardline attitude to those break social distancing rules.

NSW police commissioner Mick Fuller said he would personally review all physical-distancing fines issued in the state.

“If I think it’s unreasonable, it will be withdrawn immediately and we’ll make personal contact with the individual,” he said.

What are my options for challenging a fine?
Not all states have specified this, however, it appears these fines can be appealed using the same process as other fines issued by police.

Information on how to lodge an appeal should be available on your state or territory’s government website.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

9 SEPT NZ
NZ opens borders to separated couples
Trans-Tasman couples separated during the COVID-19 pandemic could soon reunite in New Zealand after Jacinda Ardern's government announced changes to border and visa controls.

Like many countries, New Zealand has enacted strict rules on international arrivals during the global pandemic.

New Zealand has restricted entries to citizens and Australians who are normally residents, giving out some exemptions on economic or hardship grounds.

On Wednesday, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi said NZ was in a position to allow "a small number of people" into the country who "under normal circumstances, would have the right to come to New Zealand".

Australian partners will need to demonstrate they are in a "genuine and stable relationship" when applying for the border exemption, which would see them given a Critical Purpose Visa to travel and then a resident visa on arrival.

Dependent children can be included in the exemption request.

Since the onset of the pandemic, more than 40,000 Kiwis have returned home to their relatively safe shores.

The government has capped the number of international arrivals to allow for a compulsory 14-day isolation on arrival in a largely successful attempt to keep COVID-19 out.

With capacity to house around 7000 people within isolation at a time, those doors will now be open to those separated partners, and also to regular residents who found themselves overseas during COVID-19.

Those non-citizens who did not return to NZ will now also be able to apply for an exemption to return home if they can prove they still have a job or business in Aotearoa.

"Many of these visa holders and their families have lived in New Zealand for years and have built lives here ... it is only fair to let these visa holders return given their long-standing and ongoing connections to this country," Mr Faafoi said.

In another change, Kiwis in-waiting who have been granted residency but are stuck offshore, will be able to keep their residency status for an additional 12 months.

"The government understands the uncertainty that COVID-19 has had on a number of visa holders, particularly individuals overseas who have not been able to travel to New Zealand to activate their new resident visa," Mr Faafoi said.

"If not for border closures forced by the COVID-19 pandemic, they would be living in New Zealand.

"These changes will provide around 5600 resident visa holders, who have invested a lot of time and money to be granted a resident visa, with more certainty about their ability to come and settle in New Zealand in the future."

Some 16,500 temporary work visa holders have also had their stays in New Zealand lengthened.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/nz ... d=msedgdhp
CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12574
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Wed Sep 09, 2020 10:24 am

9 SEPTEMBER DATA

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ZERO covid patients in hospital in ACT, NT, SA, TAS.

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CBDs: Cleopatra & Caesar born 28Jan19.
Puff (RIP 10Dec15),Rex (RIP 16Mar17),Toothless (RIP 26Nov17).Peppa (RIP 22Mar19).
EBTSs : George & Mildred (born july 2010).
EWSs : , Fluffy (F) rescued injured by lawnwacker 14Nov17, Gutzy (F) rescued 27Sep19 - RIP 3Aug20 (est 12 yo), Wriggles (F) - injured rescue, over 8 yrs old, RIP 2Feb16 old age. Lucky juvenile (M) - cat attack rescue (lost r-eye, broken r-lower jaw), fatal SI RIP 21Jul2010.
kingofnobbys
BD.org Sicko
 
Posts: 12574
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 10:56 pm

Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Thu Sep 10, 2020 6:55 am

10 SEPT VIC ( 3 months into Australia's 2nd Wave )

Victorian COVID-19 cases approach key milestone as deaths top 700
Victoria has recorded 51 new cases of coronavirus in the last 24 hours, with 7 lives lost.

The new deaths have brought the state's total number of COVID-19 fatalities to 701.

Victoria now accounts for nearly 90 per cent of Australia's COVID deaths.
https://twitter.com/VicGovDHHS/status/1 ... 2059317249
The state now has 1673 active virus cases.

Today's figures are a drop from yesterday when 76 new cases and 11 deaths were reported.

There are now six locations considered high risk due to positive cases of COVID-19 visiting venues and businesses.

Yesterday it was revealed more than 3000 healthcare and aged care workers have contracted coronavirus in Victoria, with Australia's Deputy Chief Medical Officer describing the alarming number as "unacceptable".

Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) figures show a total of 3286 healthcare workers have been diagnosed with COVID-19, with 2281 of those being acquired in the workplace.

There are still 252 active cases among healthcare workers in Victoria, excluding today's figures.

According to new data, aged care or disability workers had the greatest number of COVID-19 cases with 1398 infections, followed by nurses at 1256 and medical practitioners at 199.

The majority of infections - 2281 in total – were contracted in healthcare settings, with more than half (1407) acquired in aged care facilities.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Daniel Andrews defiant on Melbourne curfew after police chief denies responsibility
The Victorian premier defended his government’s decision to impose a night curfew as part of the state’s stage-four lockdown, at a testy press conference on Thursday.

Daniel Andrews was grilled by reporters on the justifications for a curfew after both Victoria’s police chief and its chief health officer claimed neither were responsible for the policy.

Andrews appeared to shoulder responsibility for the decision to impose a curfew, saying “that’s a decision that I’ve made”, adding that in matters of health and enforcement, the government was “free to go beyond” the advice it receives.

Controversy has mounted over the curfew as the government has to date failed to provide data to show it significantly reduces disease spread, or that enough public health law breaches were occurring between the curfew hours of 8pm to 5am to justify it.

The government has also failed to provide evidence to show it restricts movement significantly beyond other measures, such as closure of venues and bans on gatherings.

When pressed by Guardian Australia on data to support the curfew, the premier vowed to “try and get you some comparisons of some of the enforcement activity, pre-curfew and post-curfew”. Guardian Australia has followed up on this.

This comes a day after the premier said the state’s Covid-19 restrictions were informed by “science and data and doctors”. On Thursday, however, the premier was unable to present data to back the need for a curfew and said government decisions reserved the right to go beyond medical advice. Epidemiologists have also questioned the measure, along with restrictions on exercise.

Related: Victoria's roadmap out of Covid lockdown is 'a sledgehammer approach', expert says

“If you want to put it to the prime minister, has he ever acted beyond, in any sense, the advice that [health department secretary Prof] Brendan Murphy or [chief medical officer Prof] Paul Kelly have given him, I think the answer will be he has,” Andrews said.

“You always have to reserve the right to operationalise and deliver the advice of the medical experts and the principles that they want achieved.”

The premier’s remarks followed comments from the police commissioner, Shane Patton, to radio 3AW that he did not even know if police had been briefed on the curfew before it was introduced. “I was never consulted,’’ Patton said. “I’ve made enquiries to determine if anyone in the organisation was briefed on the matter.”

On Wednesday, the chief health officer, Prof Brett Sutton, said that while he was consulted on the curfew, it was not a measure he had suggested. “It was a separate decision-making pathway,” he told 3AW. Asked whether he would have introduced it, he said: “I’m not sure. I haven’t reflected on it. I think it has been useful. If I put my mind to it, probably.”

Andrews said the only thing the curfew was limiting was the public’s ability to exercise or buy supplies at night. Told the curfew and exercise limitations had a disproportionate impact on shift workers, he responded: “I’m not for a moment saying it doesn’t.”

He also said he needed to make the job of police “as simple as possible”. Asked about whether vulnerable populations were being disproportionately affected by the fines – with community legal centres reporting they had not successfully overturned fines they challenged on behalf of clients – Andrews responded: “No”.

“Ultimately, those matters, whether they’re overturned or not ... that’s not a political judgement, that’s not a policy judgement,” Andrews said. “Each of those matters are dealt with on their merits, and despite the types of clients that would typically be assisted by a community legal service, that has no bearing on the matter.”

Related: Victoria police powers under scrutiny after fines issued for exercise and going to supermarket

Meanwhile, the federal health minister, Greg Hunt, said it was up to the Victorian government to reveal the origin of the more onerous restrictions. He added: “We were somewhat surprised to learn that not all of the restrictions were based on medical advice.

“I think that is very important,” Hunt said. “I do know, of course, that Victoria has a strong human rights charter … [The] Victorian human rights charter sets out under the relevant section that freedom of movement is a fundamental right in Victoria and so I am sure that that would only ever, ever be impinged upon if they have the strongest reasons.”

There were 51 cases of the virus recorded in Victoria overnight and seven deaths.

Andrews was asked whether a failure to get on top of Covid sooner in workplace settings, such as hospitals, had impeded the state’s efforts to control the virus. The government insisted for weeks that health staff were becoming infected in the community rather than the workplace, before admitting that the majority of health workers infected during the second wave had acquired the virus at work.

Andrews responded that hospitals had done an excellent job of protecting staff and providing safe workplaces, including personal protective gear.

Guardian Australia revealed earlier in September that WorkSafe inspectors had issued hospitals in the state with five notices for non-compliance with the Covid-19 plan, after conducting 22 workplace visits and 244 compliance checks since 20 July.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Biotech company boss slams Dan Andrews' lockdown strategy for Victoria
The boss of one of Australia's biggest biotech companies has slammed Daniel Andrews' road map out of lockdown as a disaster and has warned there may never be a successful coronavirus vaccine.
CSL chairman Brian McNamee described the Premier's strategy as a 'map for misery' for Victoria and crushing policy for a dynamic city such as Melbourne as it recovers from a second horror coronavirus wave.

He also warned against the federal and state governments assuming a vaccine was on its way after Australia's hopes for a vaccine being developed in the UK was put on hold earlier this week.

Dr McNamee told the Herald Sun: 'It's a map for misery for Victoria. Why do I say that? There's so many factors that influence that.

'First of all the modelling is too narrow in the context they're looking for. Your model is only as good as your inputs and what you are trying to achieve with that model.'

MELBOURNE CURFEW WAS ANDREWS' CALL
Daniel Andrews claimed on Wednesday that he only introduced Melbourne's overnight curfew to make it easier for police to enforce lockdown.

But in an extraordinary retort, Victoria Police's Chief Commissioner Shane Patton said he did not request a curfew and that he only found about the new law hours before the public was told.

'I was never consulted. I've made enquiries to determine if anyone in the organisation was briefed on the matter,' he told the 3AW radio station.

'We had never asked for a curfew.'

After initially denying it was his decision to bring in the stay-at-home rule, Mr Andrews finally came clean and admitted he was responsible for it and that it wasn't based on medical advice.

The decision was 'ultimately made by me', the premier said at his daily press conference on Wednesday.

'It's not a matter for Brett [Sutton], that's not health advice, that's about achieving a health outcome. His advice is 'do whatever you can to limit movement'.

Mr Sutton, Victoria's Chief Health Officer, had earlier confirmed that he did not advise implement the curfew.

The Melbourne businessman says he doesn't know anyone who supports Premier Andrews' strict stage four lockdown and his 'roadmap' to ending restrictions.

He told the publication the premier doesn't understand the severity of what is happening in the economy.

Australian's second largest city will remain in stage four lockdown until at least September 28 after Premier Andrews extended it by two weeks on Sunday.

Regional Victoria remains under stage three restrictions which allows residents to leave home for essential purposes.

He's among a host of business and community leaders who have slammed the premier's plan out of lockdown this week.

Others included Australian Workers' Union state secretary Ben Davis, Kmart Group managing director Ian Bailey, Harvey Norman chairman Gerry Harvey, Australian Retailers Association chief Paul Zahra and Melbourne Lord Mayor Sally Capp.

Dr McNamee also had a dire warning regarding the coronavirus vaccine, despite CSL being charged as one of the companies to manufacture it in Australia.

He believes Victorian government's lockdown strategy relies on a vaccine but warned it may be 'a very long way off'.

'We can't bank on a vaccine. I think the treatments are improving but we have to learn to live with COVID. We have to manage it,' Dr McNamee told the Herald Sun.

Australia's hopes for a coronavirus vaccine are under threat after trials in the UK were paused over major safety concerns.

Late-stage studies of AstraZeneca's vaccine candidate are on hold after a patient became seriously ill on Tuesday.

The jab being developed at Oxford University is the only overseas candidate that Australia has agreed to buy while other developed countries have signed several deals.
Australia has only one deal to buy a vaccine from overseas - the Oxford one with Prime Minister Scott Morrison under pressure to sign more deals.

Dr McNamee wasn't surprised about the vaccine trial pause.

'We've said all along everyone is working incredibly hard, we're cautiously optimistic, but there are risks and that's why at CSL we've got two vaccines we could manufacture because the likelihood of both working is not high,' he said.

Mr Andrews claimed on Wednesday that he only introduced Melbourne's overnight curfew to make it easier for police to enforce lockdown.

But in an extraordinary retort, Victoria Police's Chief Commissioner Shane Patton said he did not request a curfew and that he only found about the new law hours before the public was told.

'I was never consulted. I've made enquiries to determine if anyone in the organisation was briefed on the matter,' he told the 3AW radio station.

'We had never asked for a curfew.'

After initially denying it was his decision to bring in the stay-at-home rule, Mr Andrews finally came clean and admitted he was responsible for it and that it wasn't based on medical advice.

The decision was 'ultimately made by me', the premier said at his daily press conference on Wednesday.

'It's not a matter for Brett [Sutton], that's not health advice, that's about achieving a health outcome. His advice is "do whatever you can to limit movement".

Mr Sutton, Victoria's Chief Health Officer, had earlier confirmed that he did not advise implement the curfew.
Dan Andrews admits the Melbourne curfew was put in place to make it easier for cops to enforce the lockdown after taking responsibility for the 8pm restrictions
Premier Daniel Andrews has taken responsibility for his 'captain's call' of night curfews in Melbourne to help Victoria Police enforce Stage Four lockdowns.

Five million Melburnians are currently banned from leaving their homes each night between 8pm and 5am under some of the harshest coronavirus restrictions in the world.

The night curfew, which has now been in place for 57 days, will be eased to 9pm to 5am from 11.59pm on September 13.

Andrews claimed on Wednesday that he only introduced Melbourne's overnight curfew to make it easier for police to enforce lockdown.

But in an extraordinary retort, Victoria Police's Chief Commissioner Shane Patton said he did not request a curfew and that he only found about the new law hours before the public was told.

Andrews was also forced to backflip his previous admissions he'd taken advice about the curfew from chief health officer Professor Brett Sutton when he revealed he wasn't responsible for the restrictions.

When Chief Commissioner Patton was asked if police were consulted about the curfew by 3AW morning show host Neil Mitchell on Thursday morning, he replied: 'No.'

'At no stage?' Mitchell quizzed further.

Again Comissioner Patton replied: 'No.'

'The reality is I was never consulted … our policy area was provided a copy of the proposed guidelines for our information a couple of hours before they were signed off.'

Commisioner Patton admitted the night curfew has been effective and made it easier for his officers to police the city.

'We are able to enforce with the curfew and movement is very much restricted because of it … but we weren't involved in discussions over it,' he added.

He also admitted police found out about the curfew a few hours before being made public on August 2.

Mr Andrews was initially reluctant to identify himself as the person responsible for the curfew during his daily press conference on Wednesday.

'I can't pinpoint the individual and the day, I can't give you a specific person,' he told reporters.

'If you want to go out and be unlawful now police have got the easiest set of arrangements they have ever had to catch you and fine you. That's what a curfew delivers.'

Following grilling by reporters, Mr Andrews finally buckled under pressure and admitted it was his decision to implement the night curfew.

'These are decisions ultimately made by me, so the answer to the question (of why there is a curfew) is, I've made that decision. It's a challenging one to make, but it's effective.'

He reiterated his strong stance night curfews on Thursday and vowed to remain accountable for his decision.

'As I said before, if people find fault with the rule, they can take it up with me,' Premier Andrews told reporters on Thursday.

'Decisions are made by groups of people. And I can't necessarily pinpoint for you the exact individual and the exact moment that it was suggested that we put a curfew on.

'What I'm saying to you is, anyone who's displeased with that or doesn't think that's a proportionate measure, well, that's a decision that I've made.'

The premier insists the curfew has been effective and is working.

'There's no denying - simply no denying - that those measures have made the job of police never easy, but it has made it clearer-cut, it has made it somewhat simpler, and driving down movement, just as a - there's no denying less movement means less virus,' Mr Andrews added.

'That's what all of these rules are about. And the curfew will come off when it is appropriate.'

He added the night curfew was about achieving health outcomes.

'It's not a matter for Brett [Sutton], that's not health advice, that's about achieving a health outcome,' the Premier said.

'His advice is 'do whatever you can to limit movement'. Police then say 'we need rules we can enforce'. These are decisions ultimately made by me.'

'It just makes the job of police much, much easier.'
The state opposition was quick to slam the Premier following his starting admission on Wednesday that the curfew wasn't based on health advice.

'It wasn't a Brett Sutton call, it wasn't a medical evidence call, it was a captain's call by the Premier who wanted to keep Melbourne in curfew,' Victorian Liberals Leader Michael O'Brien said.

'The curfew should go. When you consider how extreme a curfew is – in wartime we haven't been subject to a curfew.'

Former Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett also weighed into the debate on Thursday morning.

'Since when did a deputy chief medical officer have the authority to lock down six million people? On what grounds? At whose request? And apparently without the knowledge of the Chief Medical Officer. We are being led by a very small group of vindictive, thoughtless and cruel individuals,' he tweeted.

Health experts have also weighed into the debate about night curfews.

Sydney Associate Professor Adam Kamradt-Scott believes they encouraged large numbers of residents to congregate at shops prior to closing each night.

'The danger associated with introducing a curfew is shortly before that time, people realise they need to do things, so they may turn up to the shops and find 1000 other people have also had the same dilemma,' he told the Age.

'At least previously in Australia's pandemic plans we were doing the opposite, we would look to extend business operation hours and spread people's risk of infection. A curfew would do the exact reverse of that, which is risk consolidating people in high numbers at specific locations.'

Meanwhile, Professor Sutton revealed medical experts did not request the curfew but it was brought in as the state government declared a state of disaster on August 2.

'The curfew came in as part of the state of disaster... it wasn't a state of emergency requirement,' Professor Sutton told Melbourne radio station 3AW.

'It wasn't something that I was against from a public health perspective.

'I was consulted on it but it was a separate decision-making pathway.'

Professor Sutton was also asked for his personal opinion on the effectiveness of the curfew during Tuesday's interview.

'I haven't reflected on it, I think it has been useful. If I put my mind to it, probably,' he said.

Professor Sutton denied any rumours that he had fallen out with Mr Andrews and said: 'We've worked very well together.'

'I get along pretty well with all sorts hopefully across the political spectrum and across all the various personality types,' he said.

'My gig is to provide straight up robust advice.

'I'm pretty comfortable with giving it, maybe when it's not comfortably received.'

Under Mr Andrews' road map to easing restrictions, released on Sunday, lockdown will only end when there are an average of five cases per day, which is not expected in Melbourne until October 26.

Until then, a curfew will be in place from 9pm to 5am and residents can only leave home for exercise, shopping, school and work, and caregiving.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES
Calls to eating disorder support service Butterfly Foundation triple during coronavirus pandemic
Previously diagnosed with anorexia, 18-year-old Ruby Littler was so affected by the coronavirus lockdown in Tasmania that she relapsed and was admitted to hospital.

"It's such an intense environment being so isolated. I had basically an excuse to starve myself with no-one watching," Ms Littler said.

"Moving out of home I think I would have relapsed anyway, but I don't think without COVID I would have relapsed to the extent of going to hospital."

She is far from the only Tasmanian with an eating disorder suffering a decline in mental health during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Butterfly Foundation, which supports people with eating disorders and body image issues, has had a tripling of calls from Tasmanians to the foundation since the start of the year.

"People being at home unable to visit their support face to face, not being able to see friends and family, their psychiatrists, dietitians, psychologists face to face, has really affected people's recovery," Georgina Taskunas, eating disorders coordinator for the Butterfly Foundation in Hobart, said.

There has been an increase in mental health-related presentations to hospitals in general, according to Tasmania's Health Department.

In Tasmania, people with eating disorders deemed non-urgent wait up to six weeks for an initial appointment. Others with acute conditions are referred to emergency departments.

Supermarket stress factor
Already a stress factor before, shopping during the peak of restrictions and panic buying have made a trip to the supermarket even worse.

"All of the sudden the one thing I did let myself have wasn't there," Ms Littler said.

"And I guess the anorectic part of me was like, 'Oh there you go, that's another reason why you're not allowed to eat food.'

"It became very toxic, very quickly."

It is an experience shared by other Tasmanians with eating disorders.

"People suffering an eating disorder have really struggled with their routines being upset," Ms Taskunas said.

"Gyms closing, supermarkets not having familiar brands, it's all caused extra stress."

Wait lists 'not uncommon'
National eating disorders research institute InsideOut surveyed 2,000 people with eating disorders and tracked their symptoms during the pandemic.

InsideOut director Sarah Maguire said almost all of the core behaviours of an eating disorder — extreme restriction, body image concerns, purging and exercise — increased during the pandemic.

"In almost every marker of severity of an eating disorder we've seen a majority of people reporting that the pandemic has had a negative impact," Dr Maguire said.

She said more people with eating disorders were presenting to public health services for treatment.

Dr Maguire said a long wait for treatment could be very damaging for a person with an eating disorder if they were at a critical point in their illness.

"Sadly, wait lists when you're waiting for critical treatment for an eating disorder are not uncommon in our country."

Dr Maguire said more services were needed in Tasmania.

"It certainly would be very important for families and people that have eating disorders in Tasmania for them to see other services develop so they have an appropriate response regardless of their age, regardless of their gender, regardless of their geography," she said.

"When you don't have services available, you're going to have people whose illness is allowed to progress without any input, and given all available evidence, are going to have worse outcomes."

In a statement, the Tasmanian Government said $104 million has been invested in mental health generally in the past six years and it was spending almost $500,000 to employ peer support workers for people living with eating disorders.

The Federal Government is also funding a $10 million residential facility for people with eating disorders in Hobart. It is unclear when it will open.

Road to recovery
Since coming out of hospital, Ms Littler has been staying with her family in Turners Beach in north-west Tasmania.

She said her recovery was going well.

"I guess I stay with my motivators and have all these goals for the future and things I want to be and things I want to do," Ms Littler said.

"That really helps me because I don't just want to live at home my whole life and being in and out of hospital. That's not too fun."

She hopes sharing her story will help others in the same situation.

"If even one person saw this who was struggling with an eating disorder, or a parent, and it changed something for them, it would almost make all that I went through kind of worth it."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

HISTORICAL = LOW INCOME PUBLIC HOUSING TOWER LOCKDOWN ISSUES
More nasty bigotted BS from Hansen (who doesn't even live in Victoria) - councillor says Melbourne Housing Comm tower tenants should have had choice over ‘distressing’ ( stubby holders sent to muslims who lived there ) mail from Pauline Hanson,
A City of Melbourne councillor urged the council to give public housing tenants a choice to receive “distressing” mail before it blocked Pauline Hanson-branded stubby holders from reaching locked-down towers.
The councillor, Philip Le Liu, has since requested a formal investigation into the council’s handling of the incident.

The Sydney Morning Herald and the Age revealed this morning that Australia Post threatened the council with legal action after it blocked stubby holders sent by Hanson from reaching the Flemington and North Melbourne public housing towers.

Earlier that week, Hanson had made inflammatory and widely-condemned remarks labelling the tenants “drug addicts” and “alcoholics”.

The council, which was managing deliveries during the hard lockdown of the estates, decided to stop the packages from reaching the residents.

Councillor Philip Le Liu applauded the decision to provide a barrier between the mail and the residents, given its potential to cause distress and traumatise the tenants.

But Le Liu said he warned the council it was wrong not to give the residents a choice over whether to receive mail.

“I personally think the council did the right thing in terms of providing a barrier between the mail and the residents,” he told the Guardian.

“But at the same time we should have said ‘we believe this is distressing content in here’, and notified them.”

“It should have been for the residents to decide, not council to decide.”

The Sydney Morning Herald and Age reported that the stubby holders pictured Hanson with the words: “I’ve got the guts to say what you’re thinking”. The items were reportedly accompanied by a note that said: “No hard feelings”.

At the time the packages were sent, the council had responsibility for “overseeing the receipt and distribution of all food and supplies to residents in the North Melbourne public housing estate”, the council said in a statement to the Guardian.

The council’s chief executive, Justin Hanney, said the council had become aware of a “a number of identical packages” delivered to a single address on Canning Street in North Melbourne.

The packages were addressed “to the householder”, he said.

“The City of Melbourne consulted with Australia Post, and also lodged a complaint with the Australian federal police to investigate whether the delivery breached the commonwealth criminal code,” Hanney said in a statement.

“The City of Melbourne ceased its responsibility for overseeing delivery at the estate and so we requested that Australia Post collect the parcels. The City of Melbourne subsequently withdrew its complaint from the Australian federal police.”

Emails published by the Age and Sydney Morning Herald show Australia Post’s general counsel, Nick Macdonald, warned Australia Post would go to the police unless the parcels were delivered immediately.

Related: Q+A: Brooke Boney 'completely heartbroken' over Pauline Hanson's public housing comments

The email said the “integrity of the mail is of paramount importance” and that it was “fundamental” that mail is delivered as addressed, without interference, so long as it is safe to do so.

Australia Post issued a statement on Thursday morning saying that its chief executive, Christine Holgate, did not speak with Hanson or One Nation about the delivery of the parcels.

The statement also denied Holgate threatened the council, saying she has a “valued relationship” with the City of Melbourne.

Australia Post said federal laws prohibited conduct that interfered with the mail and oblige it to “complete the delivery of Australians’ mail to the designated address”.

“Australia Post takes its obligation to deliver mail as addressed seriously, and given the unique nature of the circumstances – namely with site access being denied, due to the units being under lockdown and under the control of DHHS and City of Melbourne – met this obligation when we delivered all mail to authorised officers at the site control centre,” the statement read.

“Upon subsequently being made aware that the items did not reach their ultimate destination, we raised it with the City of Melbourne and engaged with the sender in good faith to resolve the matter.”

Hanson’s office also did not respond to requests for comment. But Australia Post’s intervention came months after the company was seeking to have regulatory changes passed through parliament to temporarily ease delivery time requirements. Those changes were passed in April, with the support of Hanson.

The packages were sent in July.

The opposition is now attempting to have those changes overturned and requires the support of four of the five crossbenchers for its disallowance motion to pass.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

HISTORICAL = Melbourne's coronavirus hotel quarantine inquiry hears returned traveller received one welfare call before suicide
A man suspected of taking his own life in Victoria's hotel quarantine program received only one welfare check during his time in quarantine and not until the fifth day of his detention, an inquiry has heard.

Government agency Safer Care Victoria conducted a review into the apparent suicide of the guest.

It found the man's body was discovered more than 24 hours after he had stopped answering calls from authorities.

The coroner is now investigating the death of the man, at the Pan Pacific hotel in Melbourne's South Wharf in April, during the first two weeks of hotel quarantine coming into force.

Due to a backlog, the first welfare check call was not made to the guest until the fifth day of his detainment, the government's hotel quarantine inquiry heard. It was the only welfare check made during the nine days he was in quarantine before his death.

At least five phone calls went unanswered in the day before the man's body was discovered, Safer Care Victoria CEO and Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) deputy secretary Euan Wallace said.

"Twenty-four hours transpired between last speaking with him and escalation," Professor Wallace told the inquiry.

"My review team found there were at least five calls made during the day.

"There had been other very significant events happening in the hotel."

Due to the workload, authorised officers working at the hotels were sometimes required to manage multiple competing demands, the inquiry heard. That resulted in delays in attending to potential health and welfare concerns of guests.

Concerns were raised by on-the-ground staff that only two welfare checks were required to be performed on hotel guests over 14 days, which was insufficient.

Some welfare checks missed due to switchboard 'bottleneck'
The inquiry also heard welfare checks were being completed by non-clinical staff from the Hello World travel agency call centre.

"They had to go via the hotel switch because they couldn't call the room directly and often the switch was overwhelmed and therefore the welfare check was not done at all," Professor Wallace said.

"But we want as few people as possible in the hotel, so if the welfare checks are being done just by phone and not by a team present in the hotel, that is a good design … except the phone call had to go through the reception desk and [that] created a bottleneck through the switchboard."

The inquiry heard staff were not able to access all the health and welfare information they needed to provide adequate care to hotel guests. It heard the forms for collecting information were not well designed, and only asked guests on arrival if they had had past mental health concerns.

"The day-to-day operations were marked by a lack of communication and coordination regarding detainee information collected," Professor Wallace said.

The inquiry also heard Safer Care Victoria contacted DHHS to ask who was responsible for the care and welfare of guests, after hotel staff and nurses said they did not know who was in charge.

Brett Sutton wanted state controller role, inquiry hears
The inquiry also heard the Department of Health did not appoint Victoria's Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton as the state controller in charge of the emergency response to the pandemic, despite Professor Sutton wanting to take on the role.

DHHS deputy secretary Melissa Skilbeck, who made the decision to appoint someone else, told the inquiry she thought the job should be given to someone who had more time and expertise to look after the logistics of the program.

"You made a determination when it came to appointing someone as the State Health Controller not to appoint the Chief Health Officer?" counsel assisting Ben Ihle asked.

"I developed advice to the secretary to that end, yes," Ms Skilbeck replied.

"My view then, and quite frankly my view now, is that the overwhelming role that we needed for an effective response from the emergency management framework was one of coordination of logistics and other assistance."

Ms Skilbeck told the inquiry Professor Sutton was initially against the decision.

She said regardless of who the State Controller was, the decisions of the Chief Health Officer could not be "second-guessed or overridden".

Ms Skilbeck also told the inquiry she was not aware there was an offer made by Australia's Chief Medical Officer to Victoria's Chief Health Officer for the use of the Australian Defence Force in hotel quarantine instead of private security guards.

Mr Ihle told the inquiry that Professor Brendan Murphy made an offer for the use of Defence Force personnel in Victorian quarantine hotels on June 23.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

OUTCOME OF LOCKDOWN & PANDEMIC
Victoria could lose more than 300,000 jobs in 2020 due to coronavirus pandemic, report says
Victoria is projected to lose up to 325,000 jobs this year because of the coronavirus pandemic, a report released by the City of Melbourne says.

The modelling, which the City of Melbourne and the Victorian Government commissioned from PricewaterhouseCoopers, forecasts the economic impact of COVID-19 on the state over a five-year period.

It outlines a scenario based on stage 4 restrictions and assuming a "slow economic recovery" with public health measures in place into 2021.

The report forecasts an annual average of up to 398,000 jobs could be lost in Victoria over the next five years, with 79,000 of those in the City of Melbourne.

In 2020 alone the City of Melbourne is projected to lose up to 75,000 jobs, with 250,000 job losses forecast in the rest of Victoria, the report said.

The job-loss figures take into account positions that were expected to be created if the city's economy had grown in line with projections made before the pandemic hit.

However, the City of Melbourne said this "worst-case scenario" could be avoided with major economic stimulus and recovery plans.

"We can't afford to lose our world-class food, cafe and retail culture," Lord Mayor Sally Capp said.

"This new data shows that Melbourne needs urgent support from the Victorian and Australian Governments to support businesses and restore our marvellous Melbourne."

The City of Melbourne's economic output could be reduced by up to $23.5 billion in 2020 and up to $110 billion over the next five years.

It could take until 2024 for the City of Melbourne's economy to return to its 2019 levels, the report said.

PricewaterhouseCoopers modelled three different scenarios: one in line with government projections, one assuming prolonged public health measures, and one assuming a stronger recovery where retail and hospitality re-opens quickly.

The figures referred to in the City of Melbourne's report are based on the second, worst-case scenario, because government projections were published before stage 4 lockdowns were imposed on Victoria's capital.

However the first scenario still forecasts hundreds of thousands of job losses, with the modelling projecting an average of up to 285,000 job losses per year in Victoria over the next five years.

"Scenario two aims to show the largest likely decline from stage 4 restrictions, so a true central scenario is likely to be between scenario one and two," the PricewaterhouseCoopers report said.

The economic impacts of a worsening pandemic with more deaths and hospitalisations were not modelled.
'Surprising' survey results show business attitudes to pandemic response
In a separate survey, 18 per cent of small businesses owners said they thought their businesses would not last another 12 months.

Four-hundred small to medium businesses owners in Victoria — most in metropolitan Melbourne — were surveyed by Glow Research, on behalf of marketing company Sensis.

The survey also found 29 per cent of business owners considered the State Government's response to the pandemic as good, and 20 per cent thought it was very good.

Twenty-two per cent of business owners said it was very bad, 14 per cent said it was bad, and 15 per cent said it was neither good nor bad.

John Allan, the chief executive of Sensis, said the results were surprising considering the strong reaction from some business groups to stage 4 restrictions being extended.

"There was definitely less anger from businesses than we saw from some industry groups," he said.

"Even when asked whether stage 4 restrictions should have been lifted on September 13 as scheduled, 52.2 per cent said yes and 47.8 per cent said no."

Lifeline sees biggest day of calls in 57-year history
Lifeline has set a new record for calls this week, with more people calling the crisis line on Tuesday than on any other day in the charity's history.

On September 8, the hotline received 3,326 calls, including 898 from Victoria.

"This demonstrates, I think, the level of stress and pressure and anxiety that Australians are under in the current pandemic," Lifeline's chairman John Brogman told the ABC.

The previous record of 3,197 calls was set on Good Friday.

April and August were Lifeline's busiest months on record, receiving 89,291 and 89,235 calls from around Australia during those months respectively.

Almost 28,000 calls to the hotline last month came from Victoria, the charity said.

Mr Brogman said while people were struggling during the pandemic, the data indicated more people were also seeking help.

"I think the good news about the increase in the numbers of calls we're getting at Lifeline is that it does mean people are reaching out," he said.

"It does mean people are looking for help, and it does mean they're getting help."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/markets ... d=msedgdhp

REGIONAL AREAS
Regional Victoria records no new cases overnight
[quote
Premier Daniel Andrews has flagged that regional Victoria could soon move a step or two in the state's roadmap out of lockdown.
Premier Daniel Andrews has flagged the possible easing of restrictions for regional Victoria as cases outside of metropolitan Melbourne remain consistently low.

Mr Andrews revealed Melbourne’s average daily caseload was 70.1, while the average in regional Victoria sat at only 4.5, suggesting the state's regions could see restrictions ease beyond the first step and immediately to the second step of reopening.

“What that shows us is that regional Victoria is quite close to being able to take perhaps not just one step, but two,” he said.

“We have to be heavily caveated in terms of that.

”We need to make sure that we continue that trend going forward but we're confident that those numbers are low and getting lower and that means there will be an opportunity for us quite soon to take a step or steps towards that COVID normal for regional Victoria.”

The state recorded 51 new cases overnight with 0 new infections recorded in regional areas, leaving the regional active caseload at 72.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
[/quote]
https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Bendigo Health boss calls for regional Victoria to move to third step out of lockdown
Central Victoria’s leading health authority chief wants regional communities to move into the third step of the Andrews Government’s planned exit from the Stage 3 lockdown.

Regional Victoria is set to move to the second step at midnight on Sunday, which allows for people to meet face-to-face. The third step will allow up to 10 people to gather outdoors and enable restaurants and eateries to reopen with restrictions.

Bendigo Health chief executive Peter Faulkner said that, on a personal level, he would like restrictions to be eased.

"Of course, being responsible for health services, I am a bit conflicted because caution is required," he said.

Greater Bendigo’s active case numbers peaked in the middle of August at 54 as a result of several outbreaks at meatworks and schools. There are now only two active cases in the city.

Bendigo Health is confident the regional contact-tracing team within the Loddon-Mallee public health unit can quickly respond should there be any further outbreaks.

"We had at one point six outbreaks that we were managing at the same time and they were all managed very well," Mr Faulkner said.

He said the national benchmark for responding to an outbreak is 24 hours and Bendigo Health was responding within 12 hours.

Bendigo Health’s rapid-response testing team has been at La Trobe University this week testing the university and Kangan TAFE community. It will visit Inglewood today and tomorrow.

The hospital is testing about 100 people a day, but at the height of the outbreak it was conducting almost 1000 tests a day. Test results are being returned in 24 hours.

Opening up regional Victoria
Premier Daniel Andrews told regional media on Wednesday the drop in coronavirus cases meant regional areas might be able to reopen sooner than expected.

Mr Andrews said it was possible regional areas would be able to move directly to step three and that the decision would be driven by data.

"The most likely potential is that the second and the third steps can be taken together," he said.

"I can't announce that today. But that is what our advisers — and I think what logic tells you — would be the most likely."

A move to step three would require an average of fewer than five coronavirus cases a day and no cases from unknown origins for two weeks.

In step three, restrictions on leaving home except for four essential reasons do not apply.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

THE PLANNED MASS COVIDIOT RALLY
Facebook removes Vic lockdown 'walk'
A Facebook page for a planned anti-lockdown walk has been taken down, with the social media giant deeming it violates Melbourne's stage four COVID-19 restrictions.

Hundreds of Facebook users had signalled their intent to walk the Royal Botanic Gardens' Tan track on Saturday.

The "Melbourne Freedom Walk" claims to be legal and asks citizens to "come together, get healthy and talk about getting our freedoms back".

But the online page was hit with a "legal restriction" on Wednesday night, making it unavailable to users based on "local law".

"When governments believe that something on the internet violates their laws, they may contact companies like Facebook and ask us to restrict access to that content," a screenshot of the Facebook notice reads.

The event organiser said it meant Facebook had taken down the page, shedding 1100 users who had shown interest in the walk and 340 who had committed to attend.

It has since been re-posted for the same time and place, but garnered considerably less attention.

Victoria Police said it was monitoring potential protest activity for this weekend and wouldn't hesitate to take action.

"We will have resources committed to ensuring that people who deliberately breach the directions receive fines or are arrested, if necessary," a statement on Thursday said.

"Anyone thinking of attending a protest can expect the same swift and firm response from police as has occurred at previous protests that were in breach of chief health officer restrictions."

Police Commissioner Shane Patton has flagged there could be more protests at other locations at the weekend.

"Apparently Saturday, they're planning for the Tan and it might not be there, there could be other areas, but we will have the same approach," he told 3AW on Thursday.

Other "freedom" rally posters for this Sunday and every Saturday until restrictions end are also circulating online.

Four men were charged with incitement in the lead-up to last Saturday's Freedom Day rally in Melbourne, as about 200 people gathered at the Shrine of Remembrance and Albert Park.

Violent scuffles between protesters and police broke out, resulting in 17 arrests and more than 160 fines.

The organiser of this Saturday's "walk" is Tony Pecora, multiple media outlets have reported.

Businessman Clive Palmer dropped Mr Pecora as a United Australia Party candidate for the federal seat of Melbourne prior to the 2019 election after he peddled September 11 conspiracy theories.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/melbourn ... d=msedgdhp

Patton says police will 'take all actions we can' against Tan marchers
Protesters have reposted details of a planned anti-lockdown mass gathering in Melbourne after Facebook removed the listing as police warn they will take the same same hardline approach as they did last weekend.

On Wednesday more than a thousand anti-lockdown protesters signalled their intention to take part in a "Freedom Walk" on the Tan this Saturday after last weekend's clashes between demonstrators and police saw 17 people arrested and several charged.

But the event was pulled down by Facebook just a few days ahead of the planned rally, prompting organisers to relist it under the same name "Melbourne Freedom Walk".

Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Shane Patton said authorities would take the same approach to protests as they did last weekend which saw violent clashes between police and marchers.

"It should absolutely not be occurring, it would be illegal, protesting isn't allowed and we will take all actions we can to stop it occurring," he told radio station ABC Melbourne.

"The [Chief Health Officer] tells us if we have mass gatherings of people we will risk the spread of the virus ... we don't want to abuse the powers of the [Chief Health Officer], we understand the level of trust that needs to be in us as an organisation, we understand it can sometimes be a fragile trust and confidence.

"For us it's about using discretion but we won't step away from our responsibilities to enforce."

Mr Patton said police have taken a different response to the anti-lockdown protests compared with the Black Lives Matter protest in June because of the differing contexts in which they took place.

"A major consideration and distinction then is we did not have the absolute spread of the virus that we do have now, and that would have put a completely different framework around the decision making process," Mr Patton said.

Tony Pecora, who is organising Saturday's gathering, called on supporters to spread the message that police say violate the terms of the Chief Health Officer's orders.

On Thursday, he had relisted the event with the same wording and name but with the additional note: "The Original ???Event' was taken down with 1500+ participants. Time to reboot."

Mr Pecora - an anti-vaxxer and conspiracy theorist dropped by Clive Palmer as his party's candidate for the seat of Melbourne at the last federal election - called on supporters to spread details of the march, something police say violate the terms of the Chief Health Officer's orders.

"Please like and share and spread the word," the event details on Facebook says.

Mr Pecora told The Age on Wednesday that the Tan march would become a weekly event that grows in size and that the events were designed to remain compliant with stage four restrictions.

Mr Pecora said he had encouraged people to wear masks and practise social distancing.

Facebook, who has not yet provided specific details about why they remove specific events and how they deal with those events when they are re-listed, took the event down after about 1500 people had indicated an attendance or interest.

A spokesperson said Facebook was "currently investigating the issue".

Police estimated about 200 people gathered at the Shrine of Remembrance last Saturday morning after people used social media to tout "Freedom Day" rallies across the country. Organisers, of that event however, suggested police estimates are low and that turnout was much higher.

About 100 police were in and around the Shrine early in the day.

Mounted officers were used to move the crowd on about midday amid chants of "Dictator Dan" and "Let the kids live".

Police arrested 17 people at a gathering on Saturday that began at the Shrine of Remembrance and moved on to Albert Park Lake.

After that event, protesters vowed to continue taking to the streets in defiance of coronavirus restrictions.

Last Wednesday officers arrested pregnant Ballarat woman Zoe Buhler and charged her with incitement over a Facebook post in which she encouraged people to attend a rally..

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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:14 am

10 SEPT NSW

NSW records 7 new cases, 5 linked to a known cluster
New South Wales has recorded seven new cases in the 24 hours to 8pm last night, five of whom are linked to a known case of cluster.

The remaining two new cases are returned overseas travellers currently in hotel quarantine.
To date, NSW's death toll remains at 54 with 86 patients currently being treated in hospital.

The state has recorded 3,953 total cases from almost 2.4 million tests.

https://twitter.com/NSWHealth/status/13 ... wsrc%5Etfw

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

51 Sydney venues put on alert after visits from coronavirus cases
Image
There are now 51 venues across Sydney on high alert after they were visited by coronavirus-infected residents.

New South Wales is battling just 86 active COVID-19 infections, but there are concerns the numbers could grow after contagious Sydneysiders attended restaurants, pubs, gyms and a medical centre.

NSW Health has issued 'close contact' warnings for 13 venues, stretching all the way from the city's western suburbs to the east coast.

'Self-isolate and get tested immediately if you've been to these locations,' NSW Health said. The venues are in Ashfield, Concord, Epping, Moorebank, Newtown, Oatlands, Paddington, Parramatta, Prestons, Randwick and Sydney city.

Diners at popular Chinese restaurant New Shanghai Night in Ashfield, in the inner west, must self-isolate after a positive COVID-19 case visited on Friday September 4.

There is also a close contact warning for Oatlands Golf Club in Sydney's north-western suburbs and for punters who visited the beer garden and pavilion at Albion Hotel in Parramatta.

More than 30 venues were also visited by a positive case, with attendees urged to monitor for flu-like symptoms.

'If you have been to any of these locations during the time and date indicated you should: watch for COVID-19 symptoms and if symptoms occur, immediately get tested and self-isolate,' NSW Health said.

One of the identified venues is the Eastern Suburbs Legion Club in Waverley.
SYDNEY VENUES WITH CLOSE CONTACT ALERTS
NSW Health warns that residents who visited the below venues during the following times must 'self-isolate and get tested immediately'.

LOCATION

ASHFIELD:

The Crocodile Farm Hotel 5:30pm to 6:30pm on September 4

New Shanghai Night restaurant 6:30pm to 8pm on September 4

CONCORD:

Paperboy Café 10am to 12pm on September 6

EPPING:

Plus Fitness 9am to 10:15am on September 5

MOOREBANK:

New Brighton Golf Club 6:15pm on August 28 to 12:30am

NEWTOWN:

It's Time for Thai restaurant 5pm to 8pm on August 28

Kuleto's Cocktail Bar 6:30pm to 9:30pm on August 28

OATLANDS:

Oatlands Golf Club

Anyone who attended the Bavarian Night Dinner in the Bistro on Bettington main dining room is a close contact and must self-isolate.

PADDINGTON:

Four in Hand Pub 6:30pm to 10pm on August 26

PARRAMATTA:

Albion Hotel 8:15pm to 11:15pm on September 5

PRESTONS:

Life in the Spirit Ministry 12:30pm to 2:30pm on August 30

RANDWICK:

Fitness First

Attendees who visited on the following days will be contacted and advised by NSW Health whether they are casual or close contacts.

10am to 2pm on August 30

11am to 4pm on August 31

8am to 12pm on September 1

SYDNEY:

Hyde Park Medical Centre

August 24 to September 5


SOURCE: NSW HEALTH

Two of the state's seven new coronavirus infections reported on Thursday had visited the venue.

The COVID-19 outbreak at Concord and Liverpool Emergency Departments grew to 14 infections following Thursday's figures.

NSW Health said one of the cases is a staff member at Concord Hospital, in Sydney's inner west, while the other is a close contact of a previous case linked to the hospital.

A student at St Pauls Catholic College in Greystanes also tested positive to the virus, while there were just two new COVID-19 infections in returned travellers in hotel quarantine.

NSW Health said there were 24,760 coronavirus tests conducted in the last 24 hours. There are six patients battling the virus in intensive care, with four on ventilators.
MONITOR FOR SYMPTOMS
NSW Health warns that anyone who has been to the below venues during the identified times should watch for COVID-19 symptoms.

BALMAIN

Chemist Warehouse: 2pm to 2:30pm on August 28

Woolworths 10am to 11am on August 27

Balmain Community Pharmacy 11am to 11:20am on August 31

BONDI JUNCTION

Westfield: Platinum Fitness First 7am to 5pm on August 31

Attendees will be contacted and advised by NSW Health whether they are casual or close contacts.

CAMPERDOWN

Quality Suites (foyer) 3:15pm to 4:30pm on August 29

Rydges Hotel 2pm to 3:15pm on August 29

Carslaw Building toilets, University of Sydney 8pm to 8:20pm on August 28

CHATSWOOD

Gram Café and Pancakes 11:10am to 12:15pm on August 27

Sushi Rio 5:45pm to 7:30pm on August 27

Westfield 1pm to 1:50pm on August 27

CLOVELLY

Clovelly Hotel 12:45pm to 1:45pm on September 5

CROYDON PARK

Croydon Park Pharmacy 1pm to 2pm on September 3

GREYSTANES

Metro Fuel 3:15pm to 3:35pm on August 27

LIDCOMBE

Leaf Café & Co, Lidcombe Shopping Centre 11:30am to 1:30pm on August 31

LIVERPOOL

The Railway Hotel 10pm to 11:30pm on September 4

MAROUBRA

Fitness First Maroubra 8am to 12pm on September 5

MERRYLANDS

Big Bun 3:30pm to 4pm on August 27

Stockland 9am to 11am on August 29

NEWTOWN

BWS (123 King Street) 5:15pm to 5:40pm on August 28

Newtown Train Station 5:10pm to 5:20pm on August 28

Off Ya Tree clothing and body piercing store 7:15pm to 7:55pm on August 28

NORTH RYDE:

Macquarie Shopping Centre 2pm to 5pm on September 5 including:

Food Court from 2:15pm to 2:45pm

Coco Tea from 2:45pm to 3pm

Myer from 3pm to 3:30pm

Time Zone from 3:30pm to 4:30pm

Tommy Gun's Barbershop from 4:30pm to 5pm

NORTH STRATHFIELD:

Aldi 10am to 10:30am on September 1

PADSTOW

Bunnings Warehouse 12pm to 2pm on August 27

PRESTONS

God's Power Ministries Heckenberg 2:50pm to 3:30pm on August 30

PUTNEY

Charles St Kitchen 10:45am to 11:30am on September 5

ROSEBERY

Rosebery Post Shop, 371 Gardeners Road 1:30pm to 1:40pm on August 26

ROUSE HILL

Rouse Hill Town Centre (including Target) 12:30pm to 1:30pm on September 5

STANHOPE GARDENS

Stanhope Village Shopping Centre (including Kmart) 8:30am to 9:30am on September 7

ST IVES

St Ives Shopping Centre, 166 Mona Vale Road 5:30pm to 6pm on August 26

Coles, St Ives Shopping Centre, 166 Mona Vale Road 1pm to 2pm on August 28

SYDNEY

Virgin Active Margaret Street Gym 5:10pm to 6:40pm on August 26

If you are contacted by NSW Health and identified as a close contact you must immediately self-isolate for 14 days

WAHROONGA

Missing Spoon Café 4:45pm to 5:30pm on September 5

WARRIEWOOD

Warriewood Square shopping centre 12:30pm to 2:30pm on August 29 including Kmart, Coles, Aldi and the food court.

WAVERLEY

Eastern Suburbs Legion Club

Anyone who attended the club between 5pm and 6:30pm on August 28 is being directed to immediately get tested for COVID‑19 and isolate until they receive a negative result.

Additionally, anyone who attended the club on the following days must monitor for symptoms and get tested immediately if they develop: September 1, September 4, September 5, September 6

WEST RYDE

Eastwood Ryde Netball Association 12:15pm to 1:30pm on September 5

WOLLSTONECRAFT

Mater Clinic 8:30am to 9am on August 28

WOOLLOOMOOLOO

China Doll Restaurant 6:30pm to 10:00pm on September 3

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

CONSEQUENCES
Thai Rock restaurant was the scene of Sydney's biggest coronavirus cluster — now it's almost out of business
It's a sad cycle.

A business has a confirmed coronavirus case, so it closes while potentially infected staff and customers are traced, and the premises are sterilised.

Then it reopens, but there's a problem — the customers have gone.

No-one knows this devastating progression better than Stephanie and David Boyd, whose Thai Rock restaurant was home to Sydney's biggest coronavirus cluster.

The couple shut their Wetherill Park eatery on July 9 after a staff member tested positive to the virus.

Two months, and 103 cases later, the business is in a deep, deep hole.

A week after reopening, their restaurant is empty.

"We are down 90 per cent of what we were before the closure," Ms Boyd said.

"If we continue like this for another four weeks, we'll be out of business."

The cluster of cases, which unfolded over several weeks, was traced back to one lunch service.

"When we got the first call from our staff member, it was about getting to work to make sure everyone was safe and healthy," Mr Boyd said.

"But during isolation that's when the sadness and hurt kicked in."

Initially, 15 people were infected.

But the numbers fanned out across the city as contacts of people who had eaten at the restaurant caught the virus.

"Each new case was like a cut, a wound to me," Ms Boyd said.

"I would see a new case in the media on Facebook and the tears wouldn't stop."

On July 26, the couple's second restaurant in Potts Point also had a confirmed COVID-19 infection, leading to six cases linked over the next two weeks.

NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet has predicted the state's economy will shrink by 10 per cent this financial year.

While many businesses battle the pandemic-driven downturn, for Thai Rock, a reputational annihilation has compounded their problems.

The blowback online was immediate.

"We were told to go and die and to burn in hell," she said.

"People were leaving bad reviews about our restaurant online, even though we were closed for deep cleaning.

"I struggled to get out of bed, and I would cry every day."

Ms Boyd said she would be devastated to shut the restaurant, which they have run for eight years.

The owners have installed a thermo camera to check each patron's temperature as they enter Thai Rock.

The restaurant also has a COVID marshal to make sure social distancing is adhered to, and all the usual precautions like sanitiser and regular cleaning.

"We have a microbiologist that we hired to do surprise visits and swab the whole restaurant, and an electronic cleaner and fogger," Mr Boyd said.

"The costs are large but what else can we do, we have to try."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/sydney/t ... d=msedgdhp


HOSPITAL CLUSTER
NSW coronavirus infections rise by seven as Sydney hospitals cluster grows
NSW health authorities have issued an alert for those who attended a Sydney Hospital on the weekend to immediately self-isolate.

NSW Health said a person with COVID-19 was in Concord Hospital's emergency department waiting room from 2:20pm to 5:00pm on September 6.

They were asymptomatic and wearing a mask at the time, but authorities said anyone in the waiting area at the time for more than one hour must get tested and self-isolate until September 20.

The case has already been included in the Concord Hospital cluster, which has reached 11 cases.

It comes as NSW health authorities recorded seven new coronavirus infections overnight, including two associated with a growing cluster linked to emergency departments at two Sydney hospitals.

Of the seven cases detected in the 24 hours to 8:00pm last night, two were returned travellers in hotel quarantine and the remaining were linked to known cases or clusters.

One of the new infections is a student who attends St Paul's Catholic College Greystanes, in Western Sydney, and was identified as a close contact already in self-isolation.

Another two cases are linked to Concord Hospital, in Sydney's inner west and are a staff member and a close contact of a previous case.

There are now 14 people associated with the Concord and Liverpool emergency departments who have tested positive to COVID-19, including nine health workers.

"Investigations into the source of these infections are ongoing," NSW Health's Jeremy McAnulty said.

Dr McAnulty said two cases also reported visiting the Eastern Suburbs Legion Club in Waverley several times whilst infectious.

NSW Health said it was working with the club to conduct contract tracing of members who attended at the same times.

It said it was also investigating whether someone who attended the site on Friday, August 28 may be the source of cases associated with the club.

No known cases were infections while at the club that evening, NSW Health said, but anyone who was there on that day between 5:00pm and 6:30pm should get tested and isolate until they receive a negative result.

Health authorities also said any persons who attended the venue at the following times is considered a close contact and should immediately get tested and self-isolate for 14 days, regardless of the result.

Tuesday, September 1 from 6.00pm
Friday, September 4 from 4:30pm
Saturday, September 5 from 4.15pm
Sunday, September 6 from 5.00pm
Monday, September 7 from 3.00pm
There were 24,760 tests in the 24-hour period, compared with 20,852 the previous day.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/ns ... d=msedgdhp



COVID-TROLLS
Parents urged to note social app use after graphic video emerges
Australia's eSafety Commissioner, Julie Inman Grant, is calling on social media companies to do more to protect children. She says greater coordination between platforms is needed.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

KOALA REBELLION IN THE PARLIAMENT
The NSW Government is split on koala policy — this is why John Barilaro hates it
Whether the koala protection policy which has fractured NSW's Coalition Government is any good depends on who you talk to.

In one corner, Deputy Premier and Nationals leader John Barilaro reckons it's a "nail in the coffin for farmers", while on the other side of the divide, the Nature Conservation Council argues it will ensure "koalas don't become extinct".

Nationals MPs have been locked in meetings with Liberal colleagues since late last year about the koala State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP).

Mr Barilaro has demanded an emergency meeting to make amendments to the policy, which is yet to be officially adopted.

He's refusing to support Government bills until his party's demands are met, and today dropped a bomb on Macquarie Street when he declared his 19 MPs would effectively sit on the crossbench until their position was "considered".

This is what's plunged Australia's most populous state into political chaos.

Why does the policy exist?
The new SEPP for Koala Habitat Protection will be a guideline used by the NSW Government to determine if the iconic animals would be threatened if land was cleared for development.

It applies to the entire state and includes an updated definition of what constitutes a "core koala habitat", as well as a "streamlined" development application process.

The old SEPP was repealed on March 1, and the updated guidelines will force landowners to provide more evidence that proposed developments will not impact koala habitats.

Previously, a landowner did not have to consult their local council and could present their development application directly to the Department of Environment, Energy and Science for approval.

However, the updated SEPP includes a mandatory 28-day consultation period with local councils for developments.

If it passes that hurdle, the plans are then referred to the NSW Government for approval.

What's changed?
The new regulations effectively mean farmers have to jump through more hoops if they want to clear land.

The types of trees included in the new SEPP are also a major point of contention.

Previously, the policy identified 10 koala feed trees based on science from 1995, and studies localised to NSW's North Coast.

But the new regulations expand that definition, and include 123 trees identified by experts who say they are used by koalas for things like food, shelter and social needs.

Mr Barilaro says the new guidelines go too far, and singled out the inclusion of the cypress pine — a widespread species — in the new list of trees as being particularly egregious.

"If we were to support that we would become the laughing stock of regional and rural NSW," he said.

Who is backing the bill?
While the Nationals clearly disagree with the regulations, there's also plenty of support for the increased protections.

Nature Conservation Council chief executive Chris Gambian described the updated guidelines as "an extraordinary hill for the Nationals to want to do die on".

"The koala policy is one small measure to ensure koalas don't become extinct in NSW by 2050," he said.

Greens MP Jenny Leong said she was astounded by Mr Barilaro's move, tweeting: "Imagine being so out of touch and arrogant you thought it was a good idea to spit the dummy because you wanted to be able to wipe out koalas."

A June report estimated at least 5,000 koalas died in NSW during the Black Summer bushfires.

The report presented to the NSW Upper House claimed 80 per cent of some koala habitats were destroyed by blazes.

What's the background?
Mr Barilaro has not been afraid to criticise the Liberal Party in the past, and his relationship with Premier Gladys Berejiklian has been strained plenty of times.

The Nationals leader admitted he did not give the Premier a heads-up before making his bombshell announcement today.

The Premier has previously dismissed the public barbs against the Liberal Party as "that's just John Barilaro" but the ABC understands he was subsequently summoned to her office after his announcement today.

Last month, the Deputy Premier demanded the NSW Government loosen restrictions on the state's border with Victoria by Christmas.

In 2017, Mr Barilaro said then-prime minister Malcolm Turnbull "lacked leadership" and should resign because he could not win the next election.

Earlier this year, he was also locked in a public spat with NSW Transport Minister Andrew Constance over pre-selection for the federal seat of Eden-Monaro, which was the subject of a by-election.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Gladys Berejiklian gives NSW Nationals deadline to reverse threat to sit on crossbench
The NSW premier, Gladys Berejiklian, has given her deputy, John Barilaro, until Friday morning to reverse his threat to have the Nationals sit on the crossbenches or he and his fellow Nationals ministers will be stripped of their portfolios.

The crisis in the Coalition has been prompted by National party demands over koala policy which passed through cabinet and became law earlier this year but which the Nationals now want to be changed.

“It is my strong preference that existing Coalition arrangements stay in place,” Berejiklian said on Thursday afternoon.

“However, I have just made it clear to the deputy premier that he and his Nationals colleagues who are members of the NSW cabinet have until 9am Friday 11 September to indicate to me whether they wish to remain in my cabinet or else sit on the crossbench. They cannot do both.

“If required, I will attend Government House tomorrow and swear in a new ministry.”

National party members have until Friday morning to either support her government and its policies or resign from her ministry.

But Barilaro on Thursday night said the Nationals were sticking to their position on demanding changes to the koala policy and would not willingly vacate their ministries.

“This is about property rights,” he told Sky News. The deputy premier said the policy would prevent farmers from building a fence, driveway, shed or extra house without getting council approval.

“I am trying to find a way forward. I am not going to blow up the government. [But] if we have to walk away from our ministries that would be bad for regional Australia.”

But the NSW planning minister, Rob Stokes, said most of what Barilaro claimed was untrue.

“My colleague in the NSW government said farmers can’t build a feed shed or a driveway on their property without a koala study. This is not the case,” he wrote in the Sydney Morning Herald. “You can erect farm sheds, pour driveways, clear fence lines and engage in any routine agricultural practice that has occurred for generations without the need for development consent or a koala study.”

Stokes said koala protection “should not be about dividing our community between the city and the bush, between urban dwellers and country folk”. “Protecting the koala is protecting our shared identity as Australians,” he wrote.

Barilaro had earlier announced his 13 MPs would move to the crossbenches but would continue to serve as ministers and attend cabinet. He said the Nationals would abstain from voting but would not vote against supply.

The senior Coalition partner would need “to earn their votes” on legislation, rather than having guaranteed support, he said.

Barilaro said his party would be abstaining from voting on government legislation except when it was legislation that affected the regions or which the Nationals deemed important.

“We will not green-light just anything the government puts up,” Barilaro said on Thursday. But he ruled out voting with Labor to bring down the government or block supply.

In the most serious crisis of her political career, the premier is now facing the prospect of minority government and an end to the Coalition.

The Liberals have 35 MPs in the lower house, the Nationals 13, and Labor 36. There are also three Greens, three Shooters Fishers and Farmers and three independents.

“I am and always have been a strong Coalitionist and deeply respect the National party and all it stands for,” Berejiklian said. “It is my strong preference that existing Coalition arrangements stay in place.”

On the issue of the koala protections, which became law in March after a lengthy process and passage through cabinet, the premier said: “I have already made clear to the deputy premier that his policy concerns are listed for discussion at an upcoming cabinet meeting and will be considered by the joint party room.”

Related: Nationals MPs threaten to quit NSW government unless koala protection watered down

Barilaro had earlier said his ministers would continue to attend cabinet and expenditure review committee but would no longer automatically support the Liberals.

“We are equal partners, we are not a junior partner, and we will fight for the regions,” Barilaro said. The Nationals had said they were going to introduce legislation to repeal the koala protections.

Barilaro has accused the Liberals of foisting their guilt about koalas, whose habitats had already been destroyed by cities, onto the shoulders of farmers, whose property rights were now being attacked.

The new koala environmental planning policy expanded the number of tree species that trigger the scheme and included maps of land considered koala habitat.

If a person’s land is affected they must either seek an exemption by hiring experts to show it is not koala habitat, or they must show the development will not adversely affect koala habitat, before it will be approved.

Related: Koalas will be driven to extinction before 2050 in NSW, major inquiry finds

The new planning policy, which has been championed by Stokes, has outraged Nationals.

While the new policy is unlikely to affect daily farming activities, it will particularly hit developers who want to develop rural land around regional towns and farmers in the north-west who want to clear land.

The new policy was introduced after scientists and environmental groups warned the koala could become extinct in NSW by 2050. Many groups say the new laws do not go far enough in protecting koalas.

The Liberal upper house member, Catherine Cusack, who is based in northern NSW, said Barilaro’s position was “just bewildering”. “There’s no exit strategy for either of us,” she said.

Cusack said that communities on the north coast were highly supportive of the new koala protections, as were a number of the local councils, because it gave more certainty. “This is the moment. Do we want koalas to go extinct?”

The chief executive of the Nature Conservation Council, Chris Gambian, said the departure of Barilaro from the government benches could only be good news for nature.

“Wanting to retain the right to kill koalas is an extraordinary hill for the Nationals to want to die on, but here we are,” Gambian said.

Gambian said the Nationals had dictated environmental policy to the Liberal party for the past decade.

“The koala policy is one small measure to ensure koalas don’t become extinct in NSW by 2050,” he said.

“People who have lived on the land for generations love the bush and share our goal of ensuring koalas survive and thrive into the future.”

The NSW Labor leader, Jodi McKay, called on Berejiklian to front the media to explain whether she still had a functioning government.

“We have 300,000 people in NSW without a job, and we are in the middle of a pandemic,” she said on Thursday.

“We have seen the deputy premier blow up the government. We want to know from the premier what is the status of her government. I don’t understand how you can walk into cabinet and be bound by cabinet solidarity and then walk into parliament and vote against government legislation.”

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
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Re: Life under social isolation or mandatory "stay home orde

Postby kingofnobbys » Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:25 am

10 SEPT QLD
Queensland records zero new cases of coronavirus, 1 million tests conducted
Queensland has recorded zero new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, with more than 1 million coronavirus tests conducted since the start of the pandemic.

The testing landmark was reached after more than 10,000 people were checked for the virus in the past day.

There are now 27 active cases in the state after eight people were diagnosed yesterday.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said 1 million tests marked a significant milestone.

"That is a further testament to the extraordinary response by Queenslanders to battling this virus," she said.
Health Minister Steven Miles said there had been a real spike in testing in recent weeks.

It was prompted by several clusters in the state's south-east that were linked to two Logan women accused of bringing the virus into the state from Victoria.

"It took almost six months to reach 500,000 tests but it only took six weeks for us to double that and reach the magic million mark," Mr Miles said.

"Many Queenslanders have risen to the challenge of this pandemic."

The state's Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young said the Brisbane Youth Detention Centre cluster should be declared over in the next few days.

"It looks as though none of the children in that centre have contracted the virus, which is very good," Dr Young said.

"It looks like most of the staff have now been managed and we haven't seen any more spread.

"Then we had the academy cluster and again that one is not complete yet, but we are getting more confident that we've managed to control that."

Dr Young said the outbreak at the Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre also looked to be largely contained.

"Again we are hopeful that none of the prisoners have contracted the virus there, which is good news," she said.

Dr Young said Queensland Health was still working to contain the Ipswich Hospital outbreak, which has since been linked to cases at St Edmunds College at Ipswich.

"All of these ... go back to one, possibly two young women who contracted the infection in Melbourne and brought it back into Queensland," she said.

"That's the most likely scenario — and that's even more likely now that we've done so much testing out there and not found any other chains of transmission."

Extra leave for frontline 'heroes'
Mr Miles paid tribute to Queensland's healthcare workers and announced frontline staff would be celebrated with a "Health Heroes Week" in the future.

He also revealed the Government would give health workers two days of paid pandemic leave for their efforts.

"This is for our hardworking doctors, nurses, public health teams, ambos [sic], pathology workers and health professionals, and the support staff who help them do their jobs," Mr Miles said.

"So they can spend two extra days with their families after such a busy year.

"Their outstanding work is the reason we have prevented much greater devastation in our state."

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

THE VENUES : https://www.qld.gov.au/health/condition ... ct-tracing

DOUBLE STANDARD ON WHO CAN / CAN'T ENTER QLD
Queensland admits reason famous people can bypass border closure
Queensland's top doctor has admitted money is the driving factor behind letting A-list Hollywood actors and sports stars into the state - while turning away grieving families at the border as they try desperately to see their loved ones.

The state's Chief Medical Officer Jeannette Young has given permission for US actor Tom Hanks and a film crew to isolate in a luxury Gold Coast hotel this week.

Despite fierce criticism, she has also allowed 400 AFL officials into the state to plan for the upcoming grand final in Brisbane - as well as teams competing in the league's Queensland hub.

Dr Young sparked outrage on Thursday after banning a 26-year-old woman in hotel quarantine from attending her father's funeral in Brisbane and only granting her a private viewing of his body.

Addressing anger over perceived double standards in Queensland's border policy, Dr Young said the state needed 'every single dollar' it could get from rich celebrities wanting to do business in Queensland.
'I have given exemptions for people in entertainment and film because that is bringing a lot of money into this state and, can I say, we need every single dollar in our state,' she said in her Thursday press conference.

The decision to stop Sarah Caisip from attending the Mount Gravatt service led to Prime Minister Scott Morrison calling Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and asking her to let the woman join her grieving mother and 11-year-old sister.

Ms Palaszczuk hit back at the Australian leader in state parliament by accusing him of bullying and intimidating her.

'If it is safe, I look at how it can be done and whether that is the AFL, the NRL, whether it is swimming, tennis – all of the sports – cricket recently because we are coming into that season,' Dr Young said.

'Anyone can come into Queensland who has got a reason to come in that meets one of our requirements.

'I have given exemptions to people in the sporting industry for a whole range of codes because it is important that we start that work, but they all go into quarantine.'
Dressed in scrubs with a mask, visor and gloves and surrounded by security guards, Ms Caisip viewed her father's body on Thursday after Ms Palaszczuk refused to let her attend his funeral because of the state's draconian border closures.

Caisip, who lives in Canberra, applied for an exemption last month to visit her sick father Bernard Prendergast in Brisbane - but it took 20 days to get approved and he died of liver cancer two days before her flight.

Ms Caisip, who is six days into her hotel quarantine stint in Brisbane, was banned from attending her father's funeral on Thursday because officials believe she is a COVID-19 risk even though the ACT has had no cases for 60 days.

Up to 100 of her family and friends were allowed to attend the 2pm service in Mount Gravatt even though there is community transmission in Brisbane with nine cases recorded on Wednesday.

Instead of standing alongside them to farewell her father, Ms Caisip was only granted a private viewing of his body, surrounded by guards and without being allowed to see her shattered mother and 11-year-old sister.

State Opposition leader Deb Frecklington, who also campaigned to let Ms Caisip go to the funeral, said she was 'disgusted' by the decision.

Ms Frecklington said on Thursday: 'I'm absolutely disgusted that the Annastacia Palaszczuk and the Labor government has denied this young woman an exemption. This story is really hard to listen to.'

Queensland's borders are closed to Victoria, New South Wales and the ACT. Premier Palaszczuk faces an election next month and the tough borders are popular with most Queenslanders.

Dr Young, who is in charge of granting exemptions, said on Thursday afternoon that she is 'very risk averse'.

'We know that funerals are very, very high risk for transmission of the virus. The last thing I would want to happen is to have an outbreak at a funeral,' she said.

Dr Young said Ms Caisip's application for an exemption took 20 days because there are thousands submitted every day.

She said Canberra is declared a hotspot because 'it is in the middle of New South Wales, we know there are cases around them.'

"I have given exemptions for people in entertainment and film because that is bringing a lot of money into this state "
Dr Young admits the government's border policy is motivated by money
Queensland has been rocked by dozens of heartbreaking cases of families being torn apart and lives being shattered by the border closure.

One 60-year-woman was forced to quarantine in a hotel after brain surgery in Sydney and a mother lost her unborn twin after she was flown 700km to Sydney for surgery because an exemption allowing her into Queensland took too long.

The prime minister has been trying to persuade Ms Palaszczuk - and other premiers - to relax their tough border controls, but under Australia's federal system he cannot overrule state governments.

In a radio interview with broadcaster Ray Hadley on Thursday morning, an emotional Mr Morrison revealed he asked the premier to show some compassion and let Ms Caisip go to the funeral.

'It's not about borders, it's not about federation, it's not about elections,' he told radio 2GB.

'The only thing that matters today is that Sarah can be with her family to mourn the passing of her father Bernard. 'This is a heartbreaking case.'

Mr Morrison said he appealed to the premier to change her mind. 'Surely in the midst of all of this heartache, and everything that everyone is going through, surely just this once it can be done,' he said.

'I just hope they change their mind and let Sarah go to the funeral.'

Mr Morrison seemed close to tears when he spoke about his own experience of loss.

'Sadly she wasn't able to see her father before he passed. All of us who have been through that process know how important that is. It's still fresh in my mind,' he said.

'It was Father's Day on the weekend and I'm just thinking if Sarah had to go through that day in a hotel in isolation and there she is today.'

The prime minister said: 'I have done all I can.

'There have been discussions with our chief medical officer and raising that with them and their health ministers.'

Mr Morrison said he has 'these types of conversations with premiers on a range of issues all the time'.

'I don't seek to make them public but I rang the premier this morning and I hope she will reconsider,' he said.

In the Queensland parliament on Thursday, Ms Palaszczuk accused the prime minister of 'bullying' her.

She said: 'I won't be bullied nor will I be intimidated by the prime minister of this country who contacted me this morning, and who I made very clear to the fact, that this is not my decision.

'I passed this onto the chief health officer, and it is the chief health officer's decision to make.'

Mr Morrison strongly rejected any accusation of bullying and said he just wanted Ms Caisip with be reunited with her sister and mother.

The prime minister has also spoken to Ms Caisip to offer her support and encouragement.

The 26-year-old earlier told 4BC Radio that she had planned to visit her dad for a father's day surprise but the exemption took 20 days to get approved.

'By the time they got back to me for the approval, dad had already passed away,' she said.

'I asked for an exemption just for a couple of hours to go to the funeral, I wasn't asking them to leave quarantine after that altogether.

'They said I shouldn't even be in Queensland because the exemption for me to come to Queensland was to say goodbye to my dying father, not to go to the funeral.'

"My little sister is now without my support and I will never forgive you"
Sarah Caisip's letter to the premier
Ms Caisip said she has spoken to six health officials and not one has shown her any empathy.

'Each and every single one of them did not help me nor show any compassion with my situation. They all just sounded like a robot,' she wrote on Facebook.

'Am I going to the viewing of the body and or the funeral? No because my exemption to attend either was declined by Qld Health.'

In an open letter to the Queensland premier, Ms Caisip wrote: 'My dad is dead and you made me fight to see him, but it was too late and now you won't let me go to his funeral or see my devastated 11-year-old sister.

'You won't listen and your government is destroying my life.

'Now you are preventing me from going to view his body, which is a very important tradition for me, and also preventing me from going to his funeral this Thursday, even though I am in Brisbane in hotel quarantine and only a few kilometres away.

'I came from virus-free Canberra, so the fact that I'm even in quarantine is beyond belief but the fact that I am being denied my basic human rights to care for my grief-stricken mother and little 11-year-old sister enrages, disgusts and devastates me at the same time.

'My little sister is now without my support and I will never forgive you'.

The Queensland premier has come under fire from federal treasurer Josh Frydenberg and other government MPs for keeping the border closed to parts of New South Wales and the ACT that have no community transmission of coronavirus.

Ms Palaszczuk has adopted nationalist rhetoric, pitting her state against the rest of Australia and even declaring that Queensland hospitals are 'for our people'.

Ten days after that comment, a mother from Ballina, near the Queensland border, lost her unborn twin after she was flown 700km to Sydney for surgery because an exemption allowing her into Queensland took too long.

Then on Wednesday last week, the premier let hundreds of AFL players, WAGs and officials waltz into Queensland after clapping and wooping when Brisbane was handed the AFL grand final scheduled for 24 October.

Queensland grandmother Jayne Brown, 60, who was made to do hotel quarantine in in Brisbane following brain surgery, said the unfairness was 'mind-blowing'.

The state's chief health officer Jeanette Young has said a state would need to have 28 days with no community transmission before residents are allowed in to Queensland.

Tourism Minister Simon Birmingham said it was a 'very, very high benchmark to set'.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said: 'I don't know if we'll ever get to that number. They're putting on a pretty big ask during a pandemic.'

Last week Mr Frydenberg slammed Ms Palaszczuk's decision to allow the families of AFL players into the state.

'I think the Queensland Premier has got some questions to answer here,' he told A Current Affair.

'How can it be okay for people to go up to prepare for a footy game, and its not okay to go to hospital for treatment?'

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk hits back at Scott Morrison for 'bullying' intervention on coronavirus funeral exemption
The Queensland Premier has hit back at the Prime Minister, accusing him of "bullying" her to intervene in the case of a woman who was unable to attend her father's funeral because of coronavirus restrictions.

Scott Morrison called Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk this morning, appealing for her to allow an exemption for Sarah Caisip to attend the funeral today.

Ms Palaszczuk said she wasn't responsible for making decisions about exemptions, but said the phone call was a blatant attempt at bullying.

"I will not be bullied nor will I be intimidated by the Prime Minister of this country who contacted me this morning and who I made [it] very clear to, the fact that it is not my decision," he said.

"It is the Chief Health Officer's decision to make.

"The Prime Minister at the time said to me that he had not gone public, but Mr Speaker, I knew that he would go public.

"To use the tragedy of this personal family is disgusting Mr Speaker."

An emotional letter drafted by Ms Caisip was tabled by the LNP Opposition in Queensland Parliament.

It had previously been sent to Ms Palaszczuk.

"I came from virus-free Canberra, so the fact that I'm even in quarantine is beyond belief but the fact that I am being denied my basic human rights to care for my grief-stricken mother and little 11-year-old sister enrages, disgusts and devastates me at the same time," Ms Caisip said in the letter.

"I'm a graduate nurse from Brisbane and I just lost my dad!!!!!!! (sic)

"If you can't see how disgusting this is, then you're proving your approach is as horrible as most of the people I know are saying it is.

"Do you realise you aren't actually helping anyone by doing this?"

Permission granted for private viewing
The ABC understands Ms Caisip was given an exemption to enter Queensland from Canberra, which has been labelled as a hotspot, to go into mandatory 14-day hotel quarantine.

Today's funeral was during that 14-day period.

Sources have told the ABC Ms Caisip applied for another exemption to leave the hotel during the quarantine period, which was denied.

The ABC has been told Queensland's Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young allowed Ms Caisip to attend a private viewing, but not the funeral.

She was also not allowed to come into contact with anyone who attended the funeral.

Earlier, Mr Morrison told radio station 4BC he had called the Premier to intervene in the case.

"I rang the Premier this morning and appealed to her to overrule the decision that would allow Sarah to go to the funeral today," he said.

"It's not about politicians. It's not about elections. The only thing that matters today is that Sarah can be with her 11-year-old sister and her mother while they mourn the passing of their father and husband at Mt Gravatt today.

"This is a heartbreaking case.

"This is the last opportunity to say farewell to her dad.

"Surely in the midst of all of this heartache in COVID and everything that everyone's going through, surely just this once, this can be done.

"There has been no COVID cases in the ACT for more than 60 days."

But Dr Young said exemptions for funerals were a significant risk.

"I have always been very careful in making sure that anyone at a higher risk of having COVID-19 does not attend a funeral," Dr Young said.

"Those are people that come from hotspots interstate, or of course anyone who comes from overseas.

"Although I understand the enormous toll this takes on people who are coming to Queensland to attend a funeral of a loved one, they can't do that until they've been in quarantine for 14 days.

"The last thing I would want to happen is to have an outbreak at a funeral, and by definition there are always older people who attend funerals.

Dr Young said funerals were a "very risky environment" for the spread of coronavirus.

"I can't prevent every single death, but those that I can prevent I am absolutely adamant [about] and I make no apologies that I will do my best to prevent.

"Having said that, I also understand the awful situation for people who are coming into Queensland who can't attend a funeral to mourn their loved one."

'This bullying is the worst I've seen'
Hitting back, Ms Palaszczuk choked back tears in Parliament as she detailed the political toll the coronavirus response had taken.

"Every single day it's tough," she said.

"Every single day for everyone on my side of this house.

"I would hope that the Prime Minister would work in a cooperative manner with everyone across this country.

"And this divisiveness, and these fights, and this intimidation and this bullying is the worst I've ever seen in my lifetime."

The issue of border restrictions has become increasingly political, with opponents accusing the Premier of using it to gain voting advantage in the lead-up to the October state election.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp

NSW family's wish to farewell dying dad in Queensland 'poses little risk' of COVID-19 , expert says
A top Australian epidemiologist says the parents and children of a terminally ill Queensland father would pose "little risk" by crossing the border to say their goodbyes.

The Port Macquarie and Sydney-based family of Mark Keans, a father of four, have been unable to visit the 39-year-old Brisbane-based cancer patient due to the Queensland Government's strict border restrictions.

University of New South Wales professor Mary-Louise McLaws said there needed to be a balance between safety and compassion.

"This family, particularly those from Port Macquarie, pose little risk," she said.

"In fact, the family from Port Macquarie could be at risk going into Queensland — it goes both ways."

Dr McLaws said state governments could negotiate strict measures – including testing, quarantine and the donning of face masks or shields – to ensure families could visit seriously ill loved ones.

"Families aren't asking to go across the border to have a holiday," she said.

"They are asking to see their family through a difficult time.

"We really need a national standard that is both sensitive and highly compassionate, particularly in end of life situations."

Dr McLaws said it was frustrating that the Federal Government had not stepped in to strike a better balance.

"It's disappointing because Australians and the Australian Government have a reputation of being caring," she said.

"There is no reason why they cannot factor in a compassionate component to keeping the majority safe, and have a national approach."

Dad accused of being 'selfish'
Mid North Coast father Bruce Langborne said Queensland Health told him he was being "selfish" for trying to organise a cross-border family visit for his terminally ill son in Queensland.

Mr Langborne said his son, Mr Keans was undergoing chemotherapy in Brisbane for small-cell cancer in the lungs, back, brain and blood.

He said it was important his four grandchildren, aged between eight and 13, be allowed to travel from Sydney to Brisbane to see their dying father before it was too late.

"They've told him he probably won't survive by Christmas," Mr Langborne said.

"As much as we want to see him … the main purpose is to try and get his kids up to see him, and get them to see him before he gets bedridden and full of morphine and doesn't understand what's happening.

"I want them to remember him as someone who's still vibrant and alive."

#dayssinceEMBEDfull

Mr Langborne, who lives in Port Macquarie, said there were 11 family members, including children, parents and siblings, who were applying for an exemption with Queensland Health to cross the border from NSW.

But he said they were "getting nowhere".

"We were told, one, we had too many people," Mr Langborne said.

"Two, the children wouldn't be allowed.

"We wouldn't be allowed to drive there, we would have to fly and we probably wouldn't get out of the airport, we would get sent back home.

"We were also [told we were] being selfish because we could infect the other cancer patients."

#growthfactorgraphicEMBEDfull

A Queensland Health spokesperson said they "understood and sympathised" with the challenges the family faced.

But they said the health directions were designed to protect Queenslanders from COVID-19.

"We are in the midst of a global pandemic and we need to protect our communities, especially the most vulnerable members of the community," the spokesperson said.

"Queensland's current border restrictions are in place for one purpose — to save lives."

'Loopy politics'
Queensland Opposition leader Deb Frecklington said the family might have had more luck if they were AFL players or celebrities.

"If the Premier of Queensland thinks it's OK for celebrities and superstars and AFL people to come into the state, then it's got to be OK for some people who just want to see a dying relative," she said.

Ms Frecklington raised the case in parliament yesterday and said the border restrictions lacked consistency, compassion and common sense.

In response, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said if her Government had listened on the 64 occasions the Opposition had asked for the borders to be opened the state may have been "in the situation of Victoria".

"The leader of the Opposition called for the borders to be opened," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"The consequences would have been diabolical for this state — absolutely diabolical for this state."

When asked about the family's situation, NSW Health Minister, Brad Hazzard, described the Queensland Government's border restrictions as "loopy politics".

Mr Hazzard promised to discuss the case with his Queensland counterpart immediately, but said he was appalled by the situation in general.

"I can only express my anger, my supreme anger at the Queensland Premier's decision," he said.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australi ... d=msedgdhp
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